The Stories of the Kings of Norway Called the Round World (Heimskringla) (E-bok från Google)

Framsida
B. Quaritch, 1905
0 Recensioner
  

Så tycker andra - Skriv en recension

Vi kunde inte hitta några recensioner.

Utvalda sidor

Vanliga ord och fraser

Populära avsnitt

Sidan viii - ... improved was estimated at £10,000. These magnificent grounds were prepared and presented as a free gift for ever to the town of Derby by Mr. Joseph Strutt, for the purposes of exercise and recreation. In the centre of the grounds is a fountain, rising from a large basin filled with gold and silver fish. For the benefit of those who are interested in the study of plants, a catalogue was prepared by Mr. Loudon. The plants themselves are also marked by means of stoneware labels, bearing the name,...
Sidan viii - ... criticasters of that class whom Balzac dubbed ' intellectual eunuchs ' had the cheap impudence to call ' pseudo Middle English ' ! As Professor Magnusson writes in his preface to the new sixth volume of their ' Saga Library ' : ' It is a strange piece of impertinence to hint at pseudo Middle English scholarship in a man who, in a sense, might be said to be a living edition of all that was best in ME literature.
Sidan xiii - I suggested we had better start with some grammar. ' No, I can't be bothered with grammar ; have no time for it You be my grammar as we translate. I want the literature, I must have the story. I mean to amuse myself.' I read out to him some opening passages of the saga, in order to give him an idea of the modern pronunciation of the language. He repeated the passus as well as could be expected of a first beginner at five-and-thirty, naturally endowed *ith not a very flexible organ. But immediately...
Sidan xv - In each case the subject-matter had taken such a clearly definite shape in his mind, as he told me, that it only remained to write it down. This illustrates the poet's method of working and accounts for the fact, that the MS. of all his work shows such a slight amount of correction or alteration. In both these noble monuments to Morris...
Sidan xiv - That such a method of acquiring the language should be a constant source of merriment, goes without saying. In this way the best of the sagas were run through, at daily sittings, generally covering three hours, already before I left London for Cambridge in 1871. And even after that much work was still done, when I found time to come and stay with him.
Sidan xiv - ... linguistic evidence of mutually acknowledged weight. To real cruxes we both respectfully bowed and passed on, leaving uncertain guess-work alone. What charmed Morris most was the directness with which a saga-man would deal with the relations of man to man, the dramatic way in which he arranged the material of his story, his graphic descriptions of the personal appearance of the actors, and of the tumultuous fray of battle, the defiant spirit that as unflinchingly faced wrong-doing as open danger,...
Sidan vii - Morris wrote pp. v-xii]5 of the preface to vol. i ; the rest of it was drawn up by me, as was also the preface to the second volume and submitted to Morris' revision. Indexes, notes, genealogical tables I took in hand, also the drawing of the maps which Morris had printed in his own way. As to the style of Morris little need be said except this that it is a strange misunderstanding to describe all terms in his translations which are not familiar to the reading public as 'pseudo-Middle-English.
Sidan xiv - Off he started, translated, blundered, laughed ; but still, he saw through it all with an intuition that fairly took me aback. Henceforth no time must be wasted on reading out the original. He must have the story as quickly as possible. The dialect of our translation was not the Queen's English, but it was helpful towards penetrating into the thought of the old language. Thus, to give an example...
Sidan xii - But," he added, as by way of self-comfort, " many a man lives comfortably enough with only one lung to breathe with." His voyage to Norway had done him no good ; he had even lost flesh on it. Still he was feeling better, he said, and seemed to cheer up when I remarked how very slight a change his illness had wrought in the features and expression of his face. He could not resist giving me some impressions of his journey, and especially graphic was his description of the forbidding grimness of th«...
Sidan xiv - In fact, he found on every page an echo of his own buoyant, somewhat masterful mind, a marked characteristic of which was a passionate intolerance of all interference with natural right and rational freedom, and especially of any contradictory attitude towards a subject of the reality or truth of which he felt convinced himself. Much delight as he took in the Sagas, the work that fetched Morris most was the Elder Edda, especially the cyclus of heroic lays that deals with the grim tragedy of the Volsungs...

Bibliografisk information