The Truman Nelson Reader

Framsida
Univ of Massachusetts Press, 1989 - 302 sidor

Truman Nelson (1911-1987) was a self-educated novelist, essayist, lecturer, and social activist. He never finished high school and supported himself in his early years as a factory worker, labor organizer, actor, and playwright. Encouraged by F. O. Matthiessen, he turned to writing and in 1952 published his first historical novel, The Sin of the Prophet, a study of Theodore Parker and the Anthony Burns case. That book earned him his picture on the cover of Saturday Review and designation as the magazine's "Writer of the Year." Two novels soon followed: The Passion by the Brook (1953), on George Ripley and the communal movement at Brook Farm, and The Surveyor (1960), on John Brown's abolition efforts in Kansas. These three novels established Nelson as a major writer on the history of American radical thought. His later essays and polemical writings were influential in the civil rights movement of the 1960s, when Nelson traveled, taught, lectured, and acted in the front lines of the struggle for racial equality.

In recent years, Nelson has been neglected by scholars, critics, and the general public, and many of his writings have been allowed to go out of print. The Truman Nelson Reader is intended to restore his voice and to prompt a reevaluation of his work. The collection brings together excerpts from Nelson's published novels, selected essays, and a portion of his last, as yet unpublished, novel on John Humphrey Noyes, founder of the Oneida Colony. Also included are essays on William Lloyd Garrison, Henry David Thoreau, John Brown, and W.E.B. Du Bois, as well as selections from the 1960s: "The Torture of Mothers," written after the first Harlem riots; "The Right of Revolution," reportedly found on Ho Chi Minh's desk at the time of his death; and "The Conscience of the North," a meditation on Theodore Parker's meaning for the civil rights movement.

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The Sin of the Prophet
3
The Passion by the Brook
62
The Surveyor
101
God in Love
142
The Variations
153
On Creating Revolutionary Art and Going Out of Print
160
The Liberator
177
Thoreau and John Brown
195
The Torture of Mothers
230
No Rights No Duties
239
The Conscience of the North
254
Interview
271
An Interview with Shaun A McNiff
273
Bibliography
293
Acknowledgments
301
Upphovsrätt

WEB Du Bois as a Prophet
216

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Sidan 45 - me against him to destroy him without cause. And Satan answered the Lord and said, —Skin for skin. Yea, all that a man hath will he give for his life. But put forth thine hand now And touch his bone and his flesh And he will renounce thee to thy face.
Sidan 46 - let them be taken in the devices that they have imagined. For the wicked boasteth of his heart's desire and blesseth the covetous, whom the Lord abhorreth. The wicked, through the pride of his countenance, will not seek after God. God is not in all his thoughts. He
Sidan 252 - Whenever the ends of government are perverted, and public liberty manifestly endangered, and all other means of redress are ineffectual, the people may, and of right ought to, reform the old or establish a new government; the doctrine of non-resistance against arbitrary power and oppression is absurd, slavish and destructive of the good and happiness of mankind.
Sidan 47 - 0 send out thy light and thy truth: let them lead me; let them bring me unto thy holy hill.. Why art thou cast down, my soul, and why art thou disquieted within me? Hope in
Sidan 239 - All its authority rests then on the harmonizing sentiments of the day, whether expressed in conversation, in letters, printed essays, or the elementary books of public right, as Aristotle, Cicero, Locke, Sidney, etc. - . - it was intended to be an expression of the American Mind. It
Sidan 47 - chief, her enemies prosper; for the Lord hath afflicted her for the multitude of her transgressions: Her children are gone into captivity before the enemy.. . . Jerusalem hath grievously sinned; therefore she is removed. All that honored her despise her, because they have seen her nakedness.
Sidan 46 - time of trouble? The wicked in his pride doth persecute the poor; let them be taken in the devices that they have imagined. For the wicked boasteth of his heart's desire and blesseth the covetous, whom the Lord abhorreth. The wicked, through the pride of his countenance, will not seek after God. God is not in all his thoughts. He
Sidan 47 - —Judge me, 0 God, and plead my cause against an ungodly nation: O deliver me from the deceitful and unjust man. 0 send out thy light and thy truth: let them lead me; let them bring me unto thy holy hill..
Sidan 252 - The Community hath an indubitable, inalienable, and indefeasible right to reform, alter or abolish government in such manner as shall be by that community judged most conducive to the public weal.
Sidan 273 - A very few, as heroes, patriots, martyrs, reformers in the great sense, and men, serve the state with their consciences also, and so necessarily resist it for the most part; and they are commonly treated as enemies by it.

Om författaren (1989)

William J. Schafer is professor of English and department chair at Berea College.

Bibliografisk information