Understanding Flight

Framsida
McGraw Hill Professional, 27 dec. 2000 - 320 sidor
The simplest, most intuitive book on the toughest lessons of flight--addresses the science of flying in terms, explanations, and illustrations that make sense to those who most need to understand: those who fly. Debunks long-rooted misconceptions and offers a clear, minimal-math presentation that starts with how airplanes fly and goes on to clarify a diverse range of topics, such as design, propulsion, performance, high-speed flight, and flight testing. Not-to-be missed insights for pilots, instructors, flight students, aeronautical engineering students, and flight enthusiasts.
 

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Innehåll

Airplane nomenclature
1
The four forces
8
Wrapping it up
14
The Coanda effect
21
Does the earth support the airplane?
28
Putting it all together
34
Drag
41
Wings
57
Power
120
The turbojet
138
Lift is still a reaction force
151
Hypersonic flight
165
Airplane performance
171
Takeoff performance
178
Ceiling
184
Turns
192

Wing configuration
71
Boundarylayer turbulence
82
Wrapping it up
94
Directional stability
107
Wrapping it up
199
Misapplications of Bernoullis principle
229
Index
235
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Sidan 118 - Newton's third law states that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.
Sidan 19 - Newton's first law states that a body at rest will remain at rest and a body in motion will move at a constant speed in a straight line unless acted , upon by a force . a.
Sidan 231 - This pressure q is defined by its kinetic energy, q = \pV2, where p is the density of the air and V is its velocity.
Sidan 36 - It is equal to the rate at which energy is transferred to the air to produce lift.
Sidan 22 - From Newton's third law we know that there must be an equal and opposite force acting on the glass.
Sidan 232 - Newton's third law says that an equal and opposite force is exerted on the paper.
Sidan 29 - We have said that the lift of a wing is proportional to the amount of air diverted per time, times the vertical velocity of that air.
Sidan 157 - This topic has been covered in Chapter 2 and will not be repeated here. However...

Om författaren (2000)

David F. Anderson is a physicist at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and a private pilot. Scott Eberhardt is an associate professor in the department of aeronautics and astronautics at the University of Washington. He is also the director of the Kirsten Wind Tunnel and a private pilot.

Bibliografisk information