The English Reader: Or Pieces in Prose and Poetry, from the Best Writers; Designed to Assist Young Persons to Read with Propriety and Effect ... with a Few Preliminary Observations on the Principles of Good Reading

Framsida
James I. Cutler & Company, 1827 - 252 sidor

Från bokens innehåll

Så tycker andra - Skriv en recension

Vi kunde inte hitta några recensioner.

Utvalda sidor

Andra upplagor - Visa alla

Vanliga ord och fraser

Populära avsnitt

Sida 218 - Thyself how wondrous then ! Unspeakable ! who sitt'st above these heavens, To us invisible, or dimly seen In these thy lowest works ; yet these declare Thy goodness beyond thought, and power divine. Speak, ye who best can tell, ye sons of light, Angels ; for ye behold him, and with songs And choral symphonies, day without night, Circle his throne rejoicing : ye in heaven; On earth join all ye creatures to extol Him first, him last, him midst, and without end.
Sida 78 - As long as the earth endures, seedtime and harvest, cold and heat, summer and winter, day and night, shall not cease.
Sida 200 - Slaves cannot breathe in England ; if their lungs Receive our air, that moment they are free ; They touch our country, and their shackles fall.
Sida 224 - Whilst all the stars that round her burn, And all the planets in their turn, Confirm the tidings as they roll, And spread the truth from pole to pole.
Sida 242 - Lives through all life, extends through all extent, Spreads undivided, operates unspent: Breathes in our soul, informs our mortal part, As full, as perfect, in a hair as heart; As full, as perfect, in vile man that mourns, As the rapt seraph that adores and burns: To him no high, no low, no great, no small; He fills, he bounds, connects, and equals all.
Sida 178 - No farther seek his merits to disclose, Or draw his frailties from their dread abode (There they alike in trembling hope repose), The bosom of his Father and his God.
Sida 193 - Alps we try, Mount o'er the vales, and seem to tread the sky, Th' eternal snows appear already past, And the first clouds and mountains seem the last: But, those attain'd, we tremble to survey The growing labours of the lengthen'd way, Th' increasing prospect tires our wand'ring eyes.
Sida 230 - Know Nature's children all divide her care ; The fur that warms a monarch warm'da bear. While man exclaims,
Sida 217 - Ah little think the gay licentious proud, Whom pleasure, power, and affluence surround; They, who their thoughtless hours in giddy mirth, And wanton, often cruel, riot waste; Ah little think they, while they dance along, How many feel, this very moment, death And all the sad variety of pain.
Sida 244 - tis nought to me; Since God is ever present, ever felt, In the void waste as in the city full ; And where He vital breathes, there must be joy.

Bibliografisk information