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CHAP. IV.
A fummary Recapitulation of the

Evidences mentioned above.

I WILL now reduce into order the depofitions of the witnesses, who have been already separately examined, and enable the reader to perceive at one view what has been the opinion of men during the two first centuries and half on each individual book of the New Testament.

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1. The Gospel by St. Matthew IS pronounced to be a genuine work of the Evangelist whose name it bears, 1. by Papias, 87*; 2. by many ancient writers of the first century, consulted

* The figures after the names of the different witnesses enumerated in this chapter, refer to the pages. of this work, where their evidences may be found.

- by

by Eusebius, 89; 3. by Justin Martyr, 105; 4. Tatian, 136; 5. Irenæus, 110; 6. Athenagoras, 117; 7. Theophilus of Antioch, 123; 8. Clement of Alexandria, 125; 9. Tertullian, 132; 10. Ammonius 153; 11. Julius Africanus, 154; 11. Origen, 155; and by all the primitive writers, without exception, whom Eufebius had read, 169. .,

And this may be inferred also, yet only with a degree of probability, from the writings of Barnabas, 37; Clement of Rome, 53; Ignatius, 78; and Polycarp, 81',

: « Lardner has colle&ted together the evidences of the later witnesses in his Supplement to the first book of the second part of the Gospel History, vol. i. p. 95 -102. of the first edition.--He has treated of them more copiously in the work' which has been fo often mentioned, his Credibility of the Gospel History.“ In the Supplement he has generally confined himself to those witnesses who determine also the time when the different books of Holy Writ were composed. 'The reader will therefore find more witnesses enume. rated in my Catalogue than in his.

II. The

· II. The Gospel by St. Nark.

IS declared to be a genuine writing of the Evangelift, to whom it is ascribed, by 1. Papias, 87; -2. many ancient writers of the firft century, confulted by Eusebius, 89; 3. Justin Martyr, 1056; 4. Tatian, 136; 5. Irenæus, 110; 6. Clement of Alexandria, 125; 7. Tertullian, 132 ; 8. Ammonius, 153; 9. Origen, 155; and by all the ancients whom Eusebius had read, 169.,:

Clement of Rome, 53; and Ignatius, 78, were, probably, of the fame opinion". III. The Gospel and Acts of the Apos

tles by St. Luke, ARE adopted as the undeniable works of St. Luke, the companion and disciple of St. Paul, by, 1. the ancient writers of the first century, consulted

* For the later witnesses, see Lardner's Supplement, vol. I, p. 173-180. of the first edition.

by Eusebius, 89; 2. Juftin Martyr, 105; 3. Tatian, 136; 4. Irenæus, 110; 5. Clement of Alexandria, 125; 6. Tertullian, 132; 7. Ammonius, 153; 8. Julius Africanus, 154; 9. Origen, 155; and by all the ancient writers quoted by Eusebius, 169

Clement of Rome, 53; Ignatius, 78; Polycarp, 81; and the Communities at Lyons and Vienne, 141, may also, perhaps, be reckoned among the num. ber of witnesses *.

IV. The Gospel by St. John IS, with great unanimity and particular respect, considered as the genuine writing of this Apostle by, 1. the ancient writers of the first century, consulted by Eusebius, 89;. 2. by Justin Martyr, 105; 3. Tatian, 109. 136; 4. Irenæus, 110; 5. Theophilus of Antioch, 123; 6. Clement of Alexandria, 125; 7. Tertullian, 132; 8. Ammonius, 153; 9. Origen, 155; and by all the Fathers cited by Eusebius, 169.

* For the later witnesses, see Lardner's Supplement, · voli. p. 213-227. first edition,

tioch,

To these might be added the Communities at Lyons and Vienne, 141'.

· V. The Epifle of St. Paul to the

Romans IS declared to be authentic by, 1. Irenæus, 111; 2. Theophilus of Antioch, 123; 3. Clement of Alexandria, 125; 4. Tertullian, 132; 5. Caius, 150;

y Ibid. p. 382—390. - The Alogi, a sect that existed in the second century, are said to have rejected it. But we have no information concerning these Alogi that can be depended on : for, properly speaking, we have none else begides the later and uncertain accounts of Philaftrius and Epiphanius. And were the case otherwise, still what can the testimony, or rather the bare assertion of anonymous persons avail, when opposed to the unanimous, considerate, and weighty evidences of all the ancients, both learned and unlearned. See Walch's Hittory of Hereticks, vol. i. p. 569, fq. of the original; and Professor Schroeckh'sEccles, Hift. vol. ii. p. 175. seq. of the original.

N 6. Origen,

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