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GUARDIAN,

WITH

NOTES, AND A GENERAL INDEX

VIRESQUE ACQUILET EUNDO."-VIRG.

COMPLETE IN ONE VOLUME.

PHILADELPHIA:

DESILVER, THOMAS & CO., 253 MARKET STREET.

STEREOTYPED BY L. JOHNSON.

1837.

GIFT

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Berkeley.

Steele

Steele.

25. On Lord Verulam's History of Henry VII. Budgell
26. All Women are Ladies-Letter recommending

a Wife to Sir Harry Lizard.

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Addison.

37. On the Tragedy of Othello-Story of Don
Alonzo.

38. On Pretty Gentlemen-Letter from a Gentle-

Hughes.

Berkeley.

Berkeley. 80. Strictures on the Examiner.

Pope. 81. Soliloquy of an Athenian Libertine-Prayer

Steele.

of one who had been a Libertine.

82. Death and Character of Peer the Comedian
83. On Happiness-obstructed by the Free-think-

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97. Letter from Simon Softly, complaining of a

Widow-Advice to him.

98. Notice of the Tatler and Spectator-Scheme

of a Lion's Head at Button's.

99. Essay on National Justice-a Persian Story.

100. On the Tucker-Naked Necks-Laws of Ly-

curgus-Position of Venus.

101. Letters from France-Gayety of the French.

102. Variableness of the English Climate.

103. On the Fireworks-Serious Reflections on

the same.

104. Story of a French Gentleman-Letter on the

Manners of the French.

105. Exhibition of the Charity Children-Propo.

sals to extend our Charities.

106. Vision of Aurelia with a Window in her

Breast.

107. Letter from a Projector, offering himself as

a Nomenclator-Letter from Messrs. Dit-

ton and Whiston.

108. Institution of the Tall Club.

109. Correspondence on the Tucker.

110. On the Language of Treaty-Improprieties

instanced.

111. Improper Conduct of the British Youth-

Love of Knowledge-Solomon's Choice.

112. Art of Flying-Letter from Dædalus-Re-

marks on Modern Dædalists.

113. Letter from a Citizen in his Honey-moon-

Tom Truelove's Courtship.

114. Erection of the Lion's Head-Remarks on

Lions-on Petticoats.

115. On Criticism-Strada's Prolusion.

116. Matters of Dress not to be introduced in the

Pulpit-Letter on Naked Breasts.

117. Happiness of living under the Protection of

Omnipotence.

118. Information from a Lioness-Offer of an Out-

riding Lion.

119. Translation of Strada's Prolusion.

120. On Female Gamesters.

121. Account of the Silent Club.

On Female Undressing.

122. Sequel of Strada's Prolusion.

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Gay.

Steele.

Addison.

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123. On Seducers of Innocence-Letter to one
from a Mother.

124. Letters from a University Lion-on Horns-
Burlesque Lyric-Visit to the Lion.

125. Pleasures of Spring-Music of Birds.
126. The Attractions of Friendship and Benevo-
lence.

27. The Court of Venus from Claudian.

128. On the Demolition of Dunkirk.

129. On Anger Revenge, Duelling

176. Three Letters intended for the Guardian. Hughes

ORIGINAL DEDICATIONS.

VOLUME THE FIRST.

TO LIEUTENANT-GENERAL CADOGAN.

SIR,-In the character of Guardian, it be- | present fortune unenvied. For the public always hoves me to do honour to such as have deserved reap greater advantage from the example of well of society, and laid out worthy and manly successful merit, than the deserving man himqualities, in the service of the public. No man self can possibly be possessed of; your country has more eminently distinguished himself this knows how eminently you excel in the several way, than Mr. Cadogan; with a contempt of parts of military skill, whether in assigning the pleasure, rest, and ease, when called to the du- encampment, accommodating the troops, leadties of your glorious profession, you have lived ing to the charge, or pursuing the enemy: the in a familiarity with dangers, and with a strict retreat being the only part of the profession eye upon the final purpose of the attempt, have which has not fallen within the experience of wholly disregarded what should befall yourself those, who learned their warfare under the duke in the prosecution of it; thus has life risen to of Marlborough. But the true and honest puryou, as fast as you resigned it, and every new pose of this epistle is to desire a place in your hour, for having so frankly lent the preceding friendship, without pretending to add any thing moments to the cause of justice and of liberty, to your reputation, who, by your own gallant has come home to you, improved with honour actions, have acquired that your name through This happy distinction, which is so very peculiar all ages shall be read with honour, wherever to you, with the addition of industry, vigilance, mention shall be made of that illustrious cappatience of labour, thirst, and hunger, in com-tain. I am, sir, your most obedient, and most mon with the meanest soldier, has made your humble servant,

THE GUARDIAN.

VOLUME THE SECOND,

TO MR. PULTENEY.*

SIR,-The greatest honour of human life, is to live well with men of merit; and I hope you will pardon me the vanity of publishing, by this means, my happiness in being able to name you among my friends. The conversation of a gentleman, that has a refined taste of letters, and a disposition in which those letters found nothing to correct, but very much to exert, is a good fortune too uncommon to be enjoyed in silence. In others, the greatest business of learning is to weed the soil; in you, it had nothing else to do, but to bring forth fruit. Affability, complacency, and generosity of heart, which are natural to you, wanted nothing from literature, but to refine and direct the application of them. After I have boasted I had some share in your familiarity, I know not how to do you the justice of celebrating you for the choice of an elegant and

*Afterwards Earl of Bath.

worthy acquaintance, with whom you live in the happy communication of generous senti ments, which contribute not only to your own mutual entertainment and improvement, but to the honour and service of your country. Zeal for the public good is the characteristic of a man of honour, and a gentleman, and must take place of pleasures, profits, and all other private gratifications. Whoever wants this motive is an open enemy, or an inglorious neuter to mankind, in proportion to the misapplied advantages with which nature and fortune have blessed him. But you have a soul animated with nobler views, and know that the distinction of wealth and plenteous circumstances, is a tax upon an honest mind, to endeavour, as much as the occurrences of life will give him leave, to guard the properties of others, and be vigilant for the good of his fellow-subjects.

This generous inclination, no man possesses in a warmer degree than yourself; which, that

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