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Some Tyrant-King, the Terror of his Age,
The Type, and true Vicegerent of thy Rage ;
Thus punish him : Set Virtue in his Sight,
With all her Charms adorn'd, with all her Graces bright
But set her distant, make him pale to see
His Gains out-weighid by loft Felicity!

Sicilian s Tortures, and the Brazen Bull,
Are Emblems, rather than express the Full
Of what he feels : Yet what he fears, is more:
The 6 Wretch, who sitting at his plenteous Board,
Look'd up, and viewid on high the pointed Sword
Hang o'er his Head, and hanging by a Twing,
Did with less dread, and more securely Dine.
Ev'n in his Sleep he starts, and fears the Knife,
And, trembling, in his Arms, takes his Accomplice Wife:
Down, down, he goes; and from his Darling.Friend
Conceals the Woes his guilty Dreams portend.

When I was young, 1, like a lazy Fool,
Wou'd blear my Eyes with Oil to ftay from School:

s Sicilian Tortures, &c. Some | He alludes to the Story of Do of the Sicilian Kings were so mocles, a Flatterer of one of great Tyrants, that the Name those Sicilian Tyrants, namely is become Proverbial, The Dionysius. Damocles had infiBrazen Bull is a known Story nitely extolld the Happiness of Phalaris, one of those Ty. of Kings. Dionyfius, to consants; who when Perillus, a vince him of the contrary, infamous Artist, had presented vited him to a Feaft, and him with a Bull of that Metal clothed him in Purple; but hollow'd within, which when caus’d a Sword, with the Point the condemn’d Person was in-downward, to be hung over clos'd in it, wou'd'render the his Head by a Gilken Twine; Sound of a Bull's roaring, which when he perceir'd, he caus'd the Workman to make cou'd ear nothing of the Des the first Experiment. Docuit- licates that were set before que suum mugire Juvencum. him 6 Tbe Wretebo wbó fitting, &c,

Aver fe from Pains, and loth to learn the Part
Of Cato, dying with a dauntless Heart:
Tho' much, my Master, that stern Virtue prais'd,
Which, o'er the Vanquisher the Vanquifh'd rais'd:
And my pleas'd Father came with Pride to see
His Boy defend the Roman Liberty.

But then my Study was to Cog the Dice,
And dextrously to throw the lucky Sice:
To Thun Ames-Ace, that swept my Stakes

away
And watch the Box, for fear they shou'd convey
False Bones, and put upon me in the Play.
Careful, besides, the whirling Top to whip,
And drive her giddy, till she fell asleep.

Thy Years are ripe, nor art thou yet to learn
What's Good or Ill, and both their Ends discern:
Thou, 7 in the Stoick-Porch, severely bred,
Haft heard the Dogma's of great Zeno read :
Where on the Walls, by 8 Polygnotus' Hand,
The Conquer'd Medians in Trunk-Breeches stand,
Where the morn Youth to midnight Lectures rise,
Rous'd from their Slumbers to be early wise:
Where the coarse Cake, and homely Husks of Beans,
From pamp'ring Riot the young Stomach weans :
And 9 where the Samian Y directs thy Steps to run
To Virtue's narrow Steep, and Broad-way Vice to thun.

And

, Thou in the Stoick Porch, (cles, and other Athenian Capa &c. The Stoicks taught their tains, on the walls of the Philosophy under a Porticus, Portico, in their Natural Hato fecure their Scholars from bits. the Weather. Zero was the 9 And where the Samian Y, Chief of that Sect.

&c. Pythagoras of Samos, made 8 Polygnorus, a famous Pain- the Allusion of the Y, or Greek ter, who drew the Pictures of Upsilon, to Vice and Virtue. the Medes and Persians, con- One side of the Letter being quer'd by Miltiades, Themisto- | broad, Chara&ers Vice, to

which

Thus pun

Dr ärrstid as is thy Mind.
Wib Pellets, and with Stones, from Tree to Tree ;
A fruitlels Toil, and liv'ft Extempore?
The Droply rages and extends the Skin,
260 PERS
Some Tyrant-King."

MUS.

SAT. III. The Type, and

draw'ft thy drunken Breath, , With all

neep't the Sleep of Death :

and thy Frame disjoin'd; But set - His G Si

yet, propos'd some certain End, Are

Life, thy ev'ry A&t may tend?
Mark, at which to bend thy Bow ?
Boy pursu'st the Carrion.Crow
the Disease in time: For, when within

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Watch

in vain for Hellebore the Patient cries,
and fees the Doctor; but too late is wise :
Too late, for Cure, he proffers half his Wealth;
Conquest and Guibbons cannot give him Health.
Learn, Wretches, learn the Motions of the Mind,
Why you were made, for what you were designed;
And the great Moral End of Human Kind.
Study thy self: What Rank, or what Degree
The wise Creator has ordain'd for thee :
And all the Offices of that Estate
Perform ; and with thy Prudence guide thy Fate,

Pray jully, to be heard : Nor more desire
Than what the Decencies of Life require.
Learn what thou ow'st thy Coontry, and thy Friend ;
What's requisite to spare, and what to spend :
Learn this ; and after, envy not the Store
Of the greaz’d Advocate, that grinds the Poor:

which the Ascent is wide and might also allude to this, in easy: The other side repre. those noted Words of the Esents Virtue ; to which the vangelift, The way to Heaven, Passage is Araight and diffi- &c. cult; and perhaps our Saviour

Fat

10 Fees from the defended Umbrian draws ; od only gains the wealthy Client's Cause. To whom the ! Marsians more Provision fend, Than he and all his Family can spend. Gammons, that give a Relish to the Taste, And potted Foul, and Fish come in so fast, That ere the first is out, the second stinks : And mouldy Mother gathers on the brinks. But, here, some Captain of the Land or Fleec, Stout of his Hands, but of a Soldier's Wit ; Cries, I have Sense to serve my Turn, in store ; And he's a Rascal who pretends to more. Dammee, what-e'er those Book-learn'd Blockheads say, Solon's the veri'ft Fool in all the Play: Top-heavy Drones, and always looking down, (As over-balasted within the Crown!) Mutt'ring betwixt their Lips some mystick thing, Which, well examin'd, is flat Conjuring. Meer Mad-mens Dreams : For, what the Schools have Is only this, that Nothing can be brought [taught, From nothing; and, What is, can ne'er be turn'd to nought. Is it for this they ftudy? to grow pale, And miss the Pleafures of a glorious Meal'; For this, in Rags accouter'd, they are seen, And made the May-game of the publick Spleen ?

Proceed, my Friend, and rail ; But hear me telle:
A Story, which is just thy Parallel.

A Spark, like thee, of the Man-killing Trade,
Fell fick; and thus to his Physician said:
Methinks I am not right in ey'ry Part ;
I feel a kind of trembling at my Heart:

10 Fat Fees, &c. Casaubon | Orators, or Lawyers, grew rich. here notes, that among all 11 The Marfians or Umbria the Romans, who were brought ansy were the most plentiful up to Learning, few besides the l of all the Provinces of Italy.

My

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And yet thou snor'it; thou draw't thy drunken Breath,
Sour with Debauch; and sleep'st the Sleep of Death :
Thy Chaps are fallen, and thy Frame disjoin'd;
Thy Body as diffolv'd as is thy Mind.

Hast thou not, yet, propos'd some certain End,
To which thy Life, thy ev'ry Act may tend ?
Haft thou no Mark, at which to bend thy Bow ?
Or like a Boy purfu'st the Carrion.Crow
With Pellets, and with Stones, from Trec to Tree ;
A fruitless Toil, and liv'st Extempore?
Watch the Disease in time: For, when within
The Dropsy rages and extends the skin,
In vain for Hellebore the Patient cries,
And fees the Doctor; but too late is wife :
Too late, for Cure, he proffers half bis Wealth;
Conquest and Guibbons cannot give him Health.
Learn, Wretches, learn the Motions of the Mind,
Why you were made, for what you were design'd;
And the great Moral End of Human Kind.
Study thy self: What Rank, or what Degree
The wise Creator has ordain'd for thee :
And all the Offices of that Estate
Perform ; and with thy Prudence guide thy Fate,

Pray juftly, to be heard : Nor more delire
Than what the Decencies of Life require.
Learn what thou ow'st thy Country, and thy Friend;
What's requisite to spare, and what to spend :
Learn this ; and after, envy not the Store
Of the greaz’d Advocate, that grinds the Poor:

which the Ascent is wide and might also allude to this, in easy: The other side repre. those noted Words of the Esents Virtue ; to which the vangelist, The way to Heaven, Paslage is straight and diffi- &c. cult; and perhaps our Saviour

Fat

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