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There groweth an hearbe within this fielde,
And iff it were but knowne,

His color, which is whyte and redd,

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And Ile be your boye, so faine of fighte,
To beare your harpe by your knee.

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And whan the came to kyng Adlands hall,
Of redd gold shone their weedes.

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And whan the came to kyng Adlands hall

Untill the fayre hall yate,

There they found a proud portèr;

Rearing himselfe theratt.

Sayes, Christ thee save, thou proud portèr;
Sayes, Christ thee save and see.

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Nowe you be welcome, sayd the portèr,

Of what land soever ye bee.

We been harpers, sayd Adler yonge,
Come out of the northe countrèe;

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We beene come hither untill this place,

This proud weddinge for to see.

Sayd, And your color were white and redd,

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And sore he handled the ryng,

Then opened to them the fayre hall yates,
He lett for no kind of thyng.

Kyng Estmere he light off his steede

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Up att the fayre hall board;

The frothe, that came from his brydle bitte,
Light on kyng Bremors beard.

Sayes, Stable thy steede, thou proud harper,

Go stable him in the stalle;

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Itt doth not beseeme a proud harpèr

To stable 'him' in a kyngs halle.

My ladd he is so lither, he sayd,

He will do nought that's meete;

And aye that I cold but find the man,

Were able him to beate.

Thou speakst proud words, sayd the Paynim king,

Thou harper here to mee:

There is a man within this halle,

That will beate thy lad and thee.

V. 202, to stable his steede, fol. MS.

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- For gramarye, see the end of this ballad.

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And what wold ye doe with my harpe, he sayd,

Iff I did sell it yee?

"To playe my wiffe and me a FITT 5,

When abed together we bee."

Now sell me, quoth hee, thy bryde soe gay,

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As shee sitts laced in pall,

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And what wold ye doe with my bryde soe gay,

Iff I did sell her yee?

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And loud they gan to crye:

Ah! traytors, yee have slayne our kyng,
And therefore yee shall dye.

Kyng Estmere threwe the harpe asyde,
And swith he drew his brand;

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5 i. e. a tune or strain of music. See Ce

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And marryed her to his wyfe,

And brought her home to merrye Englànd

With her to leade his lyfe.

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*** The word Gramarye, which occurs several times in the foregoing poem, is probably a corruption of the French word Grimoire, which signifies a conjuring-book in the old French romances, if not the art of necromancy itself.

***Termagaunte (mentioned above in p. 51) is the name given in the old romances to the god of the Saracens: in which he is constantly linked with Mahound, or Mahomet. Thus, in the legend of Syr Guy the Soudan (Sultan) swears, "So helpe me Mahowne of might,

And Termagaunt my God so bright."

Sign. p. iij. b.

This word is derived by the very learned editor of Junius from the Anglo-Saxon Typ very, and Wazan mighty. As this word has so sublime a derivation, and was so applicable to the true God, how shall we account for its being so degraded? Perhaps Typ-mazan or Termagant had been a name originally given to some Saxon idol, before our ancestors were converted to Christianity, or had been the peculiar attribute of one of their false deities; and therefore the first Christian missionaries rejected it as profane, and improper to be applied to the true God. Afterwards, when the irruptions of the Saracens into Europe, and the Crusades into the East, had brought them acquainted with a new

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