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MANFRED.

No matter.

CHAMOIS HUNTER.

Well, Sir, pardon me the question, And be of better cheer. Come, taste my wine ; 'Tis of an ancient vintage; many a day 'T has thawed my veins among our glaciers, now Let it do thus for thine—Come, pledge me fairly.

MANFRED.

Away, away! there's blood upon the brim!
Will it then never--never sink in the earth ?

CHAMOIS HUNTER.

What dost thou mean? thy senses wander from thee.

MANFRED.

I say 'tis blood—my blood! the pure warm stream
Which ran in the veins of my fathers, and in ours
When we were in our youth, and had one heart,
And loved each other as we should not love,
And this was shed : but still it rises up,
Colouring the clouds, that shut me out from heaven,
Where thou art not and I shall never be.

CHAMOIS HUNTER.

Man of strange words, and some halsmaddening sin,
Which makes thee people vacancy, whate’er
Thy dread and sufferance be, there's comfort yet-
The aid of holy men, and heavenly patience

MANFRED. Patience and patience! Hence-that word was made For brutes of burthen, not for birds of prey; Preach it to mortals of a dust like thine, I ain not of thine order.

CHAMOIS HUNTER.

Thanks to heaven! I would not be of thine for the frec fame Of William Tell; but whatsoe'er thine ill, It must be borne, and these wild starts are useless.

MANFRED.

Do I not bear it?-Look on me, I live.

CHAMOIS HUNTER.
This is convulsion, and no healtbful life.

MANFRED.

I tell thee, man! I have lived many years,
Many long years, but they are nothing now
To those which I must number : ages-ages
Space and eternity--and consciousness,
With the fierce thirst of death-and still uaslaked!

CHAMOIS HUNTER.
Why, on thy brow the seal of middle age
Hath scarce been set ; I am thine elder far.

MANFRED.
Think'st thou existence doth depend on time?
It doth ; but actions are our epocbs : mine
Have made my days and nights imperishable,

Endless, and all alike, as sands on the shore,
Inaumerable atoms'; and one desart,
Barren and cold, on which the wild waves break,
But nothing rests, save carcases and wrecks,
Rocks, and the salt-surf weeds of bitterness.

CHAMOIS HUNTER.
Alas! he's mad—but yet I must not leave him.

MANFRED.
I would I were for then the things I see
Would be but a distempered dream.

CHAMOIS HUNTER.

What is it That thou dost see, or think thou look'st upon ?

MANFRED.

Myself, and thee-a peasant of the Alps -
Thy humble virtues, hospitable home,
And spirit patient, pious, proud and free;
Thy self-respect, grafted on innocent thoughts;
Thy days of health, and nights of sleep; thy toils,
By danger dignified, yet guiltless ; hopes
Of cheerful old age and a quiet grave,
With cross and garland over its green turf,
And thy grand children's love for epitaph ;
This do I see and then I look within-
It matters not-my soul was scorch'd already!

CHAMOIS HUNTER.
And would'st thou then exchange thy lot for mine ?

MANFRED.

No, friend! I would not wrong thee, nor exchange

My lot with living being : I can bear-
However wretchedly, 'tis still to bear
In life what others could not brook to dream,
But perish in their slumber

CHAMOIS HUNTER.

And with this
This cautious feeling for another's pain,
Canst thou be black with evil?—say not so
Can one of gentle thoughts have wreak'd revenge
Upon his enemies ?

MANFRED.

Oh! no, no, no !
My injuries came down on those who loved me
On those whom I best loved : I never quell'd
An enemy, save in my just defence-
But my embrace was fatal.

CHAMOIS HUNTER.

: Heaven give thee rest! And penitence to restore thee to thyself; My prayers shall be for thee.

MANFRED.

I need them not, But can endure thy pity. I depart'Tis time-farewell !– Here's gold, and thanks for thee No words—it is thy due.-- Follow me notI know my path-the mountain peril's past :And once again, I charge thee, follow not!

(Exit MANFRED.)

SCENE II.
A lower Valley in the Alps. A Cataract.

Enter MANFRED.
It is not noon—the sunbow's rays ' still arch
The torrent with the many hues of heaven,
And roll the sheeted silver's waving column
O'er the crag's headlong perpendicular,
And fling its lines of foaming light along,
And to and fro, like the pale courser's tail,
The Giant steed, to be bestrode by Death ,
As told in the Apocalypse. No eyes
But mine now drink this sight of loveliness ;
I should be sole in this sweet solitude,
And with the Spirit of the place divide
The homage of these waters.— I will call her.

(MANFRED takes some of the water into the palm

of his hand, and flings it in the air, muttering the adjuration. After a pause, the WITCH OP THE ALPS rises beneath the arch of the sunbeain of the torrent.)

MANFRED.
Beautiful Spirit! with thy hair of light,
And dazzling eyes of glory, in whose form
The charms of Earth's least mortal daughters grow
To an unearthly stature, in an essence
Of purer elements; while the hues of youth,
Carnation'd like a sleeping infant's cheek,
Rock'd by the beating of her mother's heart,
Or the rose tints, which summer's twilight leaves
Upon the lofty glacier's virgin snow,
The blush of earth embracing with her heaven,

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