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himself, as he may best be heard of all such as are present. And after that, shall be said or sung in English the Hymn called Te Deum laudamus, daily throughout the

year. 9 NOTE, That before every Lesson the Minister shall say,

Here beginneth such a Chapter, or verse of such a Chapter of such a Book: And after every Lesson, Here endeth the First, or Second Leffon.

Te Deum laudamus.

WE praife thee, O God: we acknowledge thee to be

the Lord. . All the earth doth worship thee: the Father everlasting:

To thee all angels cry aloud: the Heavens and all the Powers therein. it was that the minister is directed to turn himself to the congregation when he reads the lessons, and to recite them “ distinctly," and with “ an audible voice.”. Some of the bishops however after a time (availing themfelves of a rubric, introduced by Elizabeth in 1559) dispensed with the performance of the Morning and Evening Service at the altar; and reading-news were, in consequence of this dilpensation, erected in the tody of the church for the use of the minister; a practice, the convenience of which foon occafioned it to be general. In many parish churches in the kingdom these reading-pews still remain.

Here beginneth such a Chapter, &c.] This rubric is founded upon a practice of great antiquity in the Christian church; namely, that of the deacon rising up before the lesson was begun to be read, and calling out with a loud voice, “ Let us listen, my brethren.” General silence and attention being by these means obtained, he that read introduced the lesson with these words, “ Thus faith the Lord.” The lessons, as well as the epistles and gospels, were by the review, 1662, ordered to be taken from the new, or James's, translation of the bible.

Te Deum laudamus.] Our church, in the introduction of hymns into her ferrice, follows the practice of the Apoftolic times; grounded upon that injunction of St. Paul, “ In every thing give thanks, teaching and admonishing one another in psalms and hymns, and spiritual songs, singing with grace in our hearts upto the Lord.” i Theff.v. 18; Col.iii. 16. And the reason of directing a hymn after the leffons is exceedingly judicious, as there is no portion of fcripture appointed for a lesson by the church which does not awaken in the soul the emotions of gratitude and admiration; and consequently fuggest the neceflity of thanksgiving and praise. The Te Deum is admirably calculated to express these emotions ; being fervent, majestic, and sublime: Its antiquity and author are uncertain; Ambrote, Hilary, and Jerome, having been mentioned as its compofers. The most early account attaches a furt of miraculous origin to it. It tells us, that when St. Ambrose baptized his celebrated convert Äuguftine, before he ascended from the water, he burst into the rapturous expreffion of adoration with which the hymn commences; that Augustine immediately fubjunted the second rufiels; and that they thus continued ejaculating

To thee Cherubin and Seraphin: continually do ery,
Holy, Holy, Holy: Lord God of Sabaoth;
Heaven and earth are full of the majesty: of thy glory.
The glorious company of the Apostles: praise thee.
The goodly fellowship of the Prophets: praise thee.
The noble army of Martyrs: praise thee.

The holy Church throughout all the world: doth ac. knowledge thee;

The Father: of an infinite Majesty;
Thine honourable, true: and only Son;
Also the Holy Ghost: the Comforter.
Thou art the King of Glory: O Christ.
Thou art the everlasting Son: of the Father.

When thou tookeit upon thee to deliver man: thou didit not abhor the Virgin's womb.

When thou hadít overcome the sharpness of death: thou didst open the Kingdom of Heaven to all believers.

Thou sittest at the right hand of God: in the glory of the Father,

We believe that thou shall come: to be our judge.

We therefore pray thee, help thy servants: whom thou bast redeemed with thy precious blood.

Make them to be numbered with thy Saints: in glory everlasting

O Lord, fave thy people: and bless thine heritage.
Govern them: and lift them up for ever.
Day by day: we magnify thee;
And we worship thy Name: ever world without end.
Vouchsafe, O Lord: to keep us this day without sin.
O Lord, have mercy upon us: have mercy upon us.
O Lord, let thy mercy lighten upon us; as our trust is

in thee.

O Lord, in thee have I trusted: let me never be con

founded,

alternately the sentences which compose this divine hymn, till Ambrose concluded in the words, “ O Lord, in thee have I trusted,” &c. The opinion which attributes the Te Deum to St. Nicetius bishop of Triers, who flourished in the beginning of the sixth century, seems to be better founded than any other,

Or this Canticle, Benedicite, omnia opera Domini. O

All ye Works of the Lord, bless ye the Lord: praise

him, and magnify him for ever. O ye Angels of the Lord, bless ye the Lord: praise him, and magnify him for ever.

() ye Heavens, bless ye the Lord: praise him, and magnify him for ever.

Oye Waters, that be above the firmament, bless ye the Lord: praise him, and magnify him for ever. O all

ye Powers of the Lord, bless ye the Lord: praise him, and magnify him for ever.

Oye Sun and Moon, bless ye the Lord: praise him, and magnify him for ever.

Oye Stars of Heaven, bless ye the Lord: praise him, and magnify him for ever.

Oye Showers and Dew, bless ye the Lord: praise him, and magnify him for ever.

O ye Winds of God, bless ye the Lord: praise him, and magnify him for ever.

Oye Fire and Heat, bless ye the Lord: praise him, and magnify him for ever. 0 ye Winter and Summer, bless

ye

the Lord; praise him, and magnify him for ever. O

ye Dews and Frosts, bless ye the Lord: praise him, and magnify him for ever. 0

ye Frost and Cold, bless ye the Lord: praise him, and magnify him for ever.

Oye Ice and Snow, bless ye the Lord: praise him, and magnify him for ever.

Oye Nights and Days, blefs ye the Lord: praise him, and magnify him for ever.

Or this Canticle] This hymn, called in the Apocrypha, " The fong of the Three Children in the burning fiery furnace," was adopted by the early Christians into their liturgies from the service of the ancient Jewith church. It is a full and noble paraphrase of the 148th psalm. In the first Common Prayer-Book of Edward VIth, this canticle was directed to be used in the room of Te Deum throughout Lent; but in his second book, which contained double hymns for both lessons, the use of either hymn was left to the discretion of the minister; and the words “ Or this Can, ticle” were inserted. Athanasius directs virgins to use it in their private devotions; and the fourth council of Toledo orders it to be sung by the clergy of Spain and Gallicia, every Lord's-day, and on the festivals of the martyrs, under pain of excommunication.-Bingham's Ant. b. xiv. c. 3,

ye

Oye Light and Darkness, bless ye the Lord: praise him, and magnify him for ever.

Oye Lightnings and Clouds, bless ye the Lord: praise him, and magnify him for ever.

O let the Earth bless the Lord: yea, let it praise him, and magnify him for ever. 0 ye

Mountains and Hills, bless ye the Lord: praise him, and magnify him for ever.

O all ye green Things upon the earth, bless the Lord: praise him, and magnify him for ever.

Oye Wells, bless ye the Lord: praise him, and maga nify him for ever. O

ye Seas and Floods, bless ye the Lord: praise him, and magnify him for ever,

Oye Whales, and all that move in the waters, bless ye the Lord: praise him, and magnify him for ever. O all

ye Fowls of the Air, bless ye the Lord: praise him, and magnify him for ever.

O all ye Beasts and Cattle, bless y'e the Lord: praise him, and magnify him for ever.

Oye Children of Men, bless ye the Lord: praise him, and maguify him for ever.

O let Israel bless the Lord: praise him, and magnify him for ever.

Oye Priests of the Lord, bless ye the Lord: praise him, and magnify him for ever.

Oye Servants of the Lord, bless ye the Lord: praise him, and magnify him for ever. Oye Spirits and Souls of the rigliteous, bless ye

the Lord: praise him, and magnify him for ever.

Oye Holy and Humble Men of Heart, bless ye the Lord. praise him, and magnify him for ever.

( Ananias, Azarias, and Mifael, bless ye the Lord: praise him, and magnify him for ever.'

Glory be to the Father, &c.
As it was in the beginning, &c.

Then shall be read in like manner the Second Lesson, taken out of the New Testament, and after that the Hymn following; except when that shall happen to be read in the

Chapler for the day, or for the Gospel on St. John Baptist's day.

Beneditus. St. Luke i. 68.

B

LESSED be the Lord God of Israel; for he liath vi

sited and redeemed his people; And hath raised up a mighty falvation for us : in the house of his servant David;

As he spake by the mouth of his holy prophets: which have been since the world began;

That we should be saved from our enemies: and from the hands of all that hate us;

To perform the mercy promised to our forefathers: and to remember his holy covenant;

To perform the oath which he sware to our forefather Abraham: that he would give us;

That we being delivered out of the hand of our enemies: might serve him without fear,

In holiness and righteousness before him: all the days of our life.

And thou, Child, shalt be called the Prophet of the Highest: for thou shalt go before the face of the Lord to prepare his ways;

To give knowledge of salvation unto his people: for the remission of their sins,

Through the tender mercy of our God: whereby the Day-spring from on high hath visited us;

To give light to them that sit in darkness, and in the shadow of death; and to guide our feet into the way of peace.

Glory be to the Father, &c.
As it was in the beginning, &c,

Benedictus The second lesson for morning service being selected either from the Gospels, or the Acts of the Apostles, which contain the history of man's redemption, the hymn before us, uttered by Zacharias at the circumcision of his son, was judged an appropriate portion of Scripture to be recited after the second lesson; as it contains a thanksgiving to God for the unspeakable blessings of redemption. But as the latter part of it is less general than the former, and refers particularly to John the Baptist and his office, the following pfalm is generally used, and with propriety, in the room of the Benedictus,

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