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a Chorus and Dances of Satires, which had before been us'd in the Celebration of their Festivals; and there they were ever afterwards retain'd. The Character of them was also kept, which was Mirth and Wantonnels : And this was given, I suppose, to the Foly of the common Audience, who foon grow weary of good Sense; and as we daily fee, in our own Age, and Country, are apt to forsake Poetry, and fill ready to return to Buffoonry and Farce. From bence it came, that in the Olympique. Games, where the Poets contended for four Prizes, the Satirique. Trag-dy was the last of them; for in the reft, the Satires were excluded from the Chorus. Among the Plays of Euripides, which are yet remaining, there is one of thefe Satiriques, which is call'd the Cyclops ; in which we may fee the Nature of those Poems, and from thence conclude, what Likeness they have to the Roman Satyr.

The Story of this Cyclops, whose Name was Polyphemus, fo famous in the Grecian. Fables; was, That Ulyfes, who with his Company was driven on the Coast of Sicily, where those Cyclops inhabited, coming to ask Relief from Silenus, and the Satires, who were Herdsmen to that one-ey'd Giant, was kindly receiv'd by them, and entertain'd; 'till being perceiv'd by Polyphemas, they were made Prisoners, againt the Kites of Hospitality, for which Ulyffes eloquently pleaded, were afterwards put down in the Den, and some of them deyour'd; After which, Ulles having made him druns, when he was alleep, thrust a great Firebrand into his Eye ; and so revenging his dead. Followers, escap'd with the remaining Party of the living: And Silenus, and the Satires, were freed from their Servitude under Polyphemus, and remitted to their first Liberty of attending and accompanying their Patron Bacchus.

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This was the Subject of the Tragedy, which be. ing one of those that end with a happy Event, therefore by Anistotle judg'd below the other Sort, whose Success is unfortunate. Notwithstanding which, the Satines, who were part of the Dramatis Perfona, as well as the whole Chorus, were properly introduc'd into the Nature of the Poem, which is mix'd of Farce and Tragedy. The Adventure of Ulles was to entertain the Judging Part of the Audience; and the uncouth Perfons of Silenus, and the Satires, to divert the Cominop Pe ple with their grofs Railleries.

Your LordMhip has perceiv?d, by this time, that this Sativique Tragedy, and the Roman Satyr, have little Refemblances in any other Features. The vea ry Kinds are different : For what has a Pastoral Tragedy to do with a Paper of Verses satyrically. written? The Character and Raillery of the Sam tires, is the only thing that cou'd pretend to a Likenefs: Were Scaliger and Heimhus alive to maintain their Opinion. An the tirit Farces of the Romans, which were the Rudiments of their Poetry, were written before they had any Communication with the Greeks; or indeed, any Knowledge of that People.

And here it will be proper to give the Definition of the Greek Satirique Foem from Casaubon, bea fore I leave this Subject. The Satirique, fays he, is a Dramatique Poem, annex'd to a Tragedy; having a Chorus, which consists of Satires: The Persons represented in it, are illustrious Men: The A&tion of it is great; the Style is partly serious, and partly jocular; and the Event of the A&ion most commonly is happy.

The Grecians, besides thele Satirique Tragedies had another kind of Poem, which they call'a Silli ; which were more of kin to the Roman Satyr:

Those

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a Chorus and Dances of Satires, which had before been us'd in the Celebration of their Festivals; and there they were ever afterwards retain’d, The Character of them was also kept, which was Mirth and Wantonnels : And this was given, I suppose, to the Foly of the common Audience, who foon grow weary of good Sense ; and as we daily fee, in our own age, and Country, are apt to forsake Poetry, and fill ready to return to Buffoonry and Farce. From hence it came, that in the Olympique Games, where the Poets contended for four Prizes, the Satirique Tragedy was the last of thein; for in the reft, the Satires were excluded from the Chorus. Among the Plays of Euripides, which are yet remaining, there is one of these Satiriques, which is call'd the Cyclops ; in which we may fee the Nature of those Poems, and from thence conclude, what Likeness they have to the Roman Satyr.

The Story of this Cyclops, whose Name was Polyphemus, so famous in the Grecian Fables, was, That Ulysses, who with his Company was driven on the Coast of Sicily, where thole Cyclops inhabited, coming to ask Relief from Silenus, and the Satires, who were Herdsmen to that one-ey'd Giant, was kindly receiv'd by them, and entertain'd; 'till being perceiv'd by Polyphemas, they were made Prisoners, against the Kites of Hospitality, for which Ulyfes eloquently pleaded, were afterwards put down in the Den, and some of them deyour'd; After which, Ulsiles having made him drunk, when he was alleep, thrust a great Firebrand into his Eye ; and lo revenging his dead. Followers, escap?d with the remaining Party of the living; And Silenus, and the Satires, were freed from their Servitude under Polyphemus, and remitted to their firfo Liberty of attending and accompanying their Patron Bacchus.

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· This was the Subject of the Tragedy, which be. ing one of those that end with a happy Event, is therefore by Aristotle judg d below the other Sort, whose Success is unfortunate. Notwithstanding which the Satines, who were part of the Dramatis Perfonæ, as well as the whole Chorus, were properly introduc'd into the Nature of the Poem, which is mix’d. of Farce and Tragedy. The Adventure of Ulles was to entertain the Judging Part of the Audience; and the uncouth Perfons of Silenus, and the Satires, to divert the Cominop Pe ple with their grofs Railleries.

Your Lordhip has perceiv’d, by this time, that this Sativique Tragedy, and the Roman Satyr, have little Refemblances in any other Features. The ve ry Kinds are different: For what has a Pastoral Tragedy to do with a Paper of Verses satyrically written? The Character and Raillery of the Sam tires, is the only thing that cou'd pretend to a LikeDess: Were Scaliger and Heinfus alive to maintain their opinion. An the tirit Farces of the Romans, which were the Rudiments of their Poetry, were written before they had any Communication with the Greeks; or indeed, any Knowledge of that People.

And here it will be proper to give the Definition of the Greek Satirique Foem from Casaubon, before I leave this Subject. The Satirique, fays he, is a Dramatique Poem, annex'd to a Tragedy; having a Chorus, which confitts of Satires: The Perfons represented in it, are illustrious Men: The Adion of it is great; the Style is partly serious, and partly jocular; and the Event of the Action most commonly is happy.

The Grecians, besides thele Satirique Tragedies, had another kind of Poem, which they call'a Silli; which were more of kin to the Roman Satyr :

Thosc

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Those Silli were indeed invective Poems, but of a different Species from the Roman Puems of Ennius, Pacuvius, Lucilius, Horace, and the rest of their Successors. They were so call'd, says Cafana bon in one place, from Silenus, the Foster-Father of Bacchus; but in another Place, bethinking him i self better, he derives their Name Sorg onsivere, from their Scoffing and Petulancy. From fome Fragments of the Silli, written by Timon, we may find, that they were Satirique Poems, full of Parodies; that is, of Verses patch'd up from great Poets, and turn'd into another Sense than their Author intended them. Such among the Romans is the famous Centu of Aufonius ; where the Words are Virgil's: But by applying them to another Sense, they are made the Relation of a Wedding-Night; and the A&.of Consummation fulsomely describ'd in the very Words of the most Modest amongst all Poets. Of the fame manner are our Songs, which are turn'd into Burlesque, and the serious Words of the Author perverted into a ridiculous Meaning. Thus in Timon's Silli the Words are generally those of Homer, and the Tragique Poets; but he applies them Satirically, to some Customs and Kinds of Philosophy, which he arraigns. But the Romans not using any of these Parodies in their Satyrs; fometimes, indeed, repeating Verses of Os ther Men, as Perfius cites fome of Nero's; but not turning them into another Meaning, the Silli cannot be suppos'd to be the Original of Roman Satyr. To these Silli, consisting of Parodies, we may properly add the Satyrs which were written against particular Persons; such as were the lambiques of Archilochus again't Lycambos, which Horace un. doubtedly imitated in some of his Odes and Epodes, whose Titles bear a sufficient Witness of it: Í might also name the Invective of Ovid against lbis;

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