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Nowe, out alas ! the tanner he cryde,

That ever I sawe this daye !
Thou art a strong thiefe, yon come thy fellowes 155

Will beare my cowe-hide away.

They are no thieves, the king replyde,

I sweare, soe mote I thee :
But they are the lords of the north countrèy,

Here come to hunt with mee.

160

And foone before our king they came,

And knelt downe on the grounde:
Then might the tanner have beene awaye,

He had lever than twentye pounde.

165

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A coller, a coller *, here: fayd the king,

A coller he loud did crye:
Then woulde he lever then twentye pound,

He had not beene so nighe.

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170

A coller, a coller, the tanner, he fayd,

I trowe it will breed sorrowe:
After a coller comes a halter,

And I shall be hanged to-morrowe.

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Awaye

A collar was anciently used in the ceremony of conferring knighthood,

Awaye with thy feare, thou jolly tanner,

For the sport thou hast shewn to me,
I wote noe halter thou shalt weare,

But thou shalt have a knight's fee.

175

For Plumpton-parke I will give thee,

With tenements faire beside :
'Tis worth three hundred markes by the yeare,

To maintaine thy good cowe hide.”

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Gramercye, my liege, the tanner replyde,

For the favour, which thou hast showne:
If ever thou comeft to merry Tamworth,

Neates leather shall clout thy Thoen.

1

1

XV.

AS YE CAME FROM THE HOLY LAND,

DIALOGUE BETWEEN A PILGRIM AND TRAVELLER.

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The scene of this song is the same, as in num. XIII. The pilgrimage to Walfingham suggested the plan of many popu. lar pieces. In the Pepys collection, Vol. I. p. 226, is a kind of Interlude in the old ballad style, of which the first Aanza alone is worth reprinting,

As I went to Walsingham,

To the thrine with speede,
Met I with a jolly palmer
Ia a pilgrimes weede.

Now

2

Now God you save, you jolly palmer !

« Welcome, lady gay,
« Oft have I sued to thee for love."

_Oft have I said you nay.
The pilgrimages undertaken on pretence of religion, were
often productive of affairs of gallantry, and led the votaries
to no other forine than that of Venus.

The following ballad was once very popular ; it is quoted in Fletcher's Knt. of the burning teffle," A&t. 2. sc. ult. and, in another old play, called, Hans Beer-pot, his invisible Comedy &c." 4to, 1618 ; Act 1.--The copy below was communicated to the Editor by the late Mr. Shenstone from an ancient MS, which being imperfect was supplied by him with a concluding stanza.

We have placed this, and Gentle HERDSMAN &c. thus early in the volume, upon a presumption that they must have been written, if not before the disolution of the monafteries, yet while the remembrance of them was fresh in the minds of the people,

S ye came from the holy land

Of blessed' Walfingham,
O met you not with my true love

As by the way ye came?

AS

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“ How should I know your true love,

66 That have met many a one, " As I came from the holy land, " That have both come, and

gone

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My love is neither white *, nor browne,

Bat as the heavens faire;
There is none hath her forma divine,

Either in earth, or ayre.

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's. Such

fc. pale.

6. Such an one did I meet, good fir,

“ With an angelicke face? " Who like a nymphe, a queene appeard

« Both in her gait, her grace."

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6. What is the cause the leaves thee thus,

“ And a new way doth take, 6. That some time loved thee as her life,

“ And thee her joy did make ?"

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I that loved her all my youth,

Growe old now as you see ; Love liketh not the falling fruite,

Nor yet the withered tree.

30

For love is like a carelesse childe,

Forgetting promise past :
He is blind, or deaf, whenere he lift ;

His faith is never fast.

His fond' defire is fickle found,

And yieldes a trustlesse joye: Wonne with a world of toil and care,

And loft ev'n with a toye,

а

35

Such

Such is the love of womankinde,

Or Loves faire name abufde,
Beneathe which many vaine desires,

And follyes are excufde.

40

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• But true love is a lasting fire,

• Which viewless veftals * tend,
6 That burnes for ever in the soule,

. And knowes nor change, nor end.'

* fc. Angels

XVI.

HARDY KNUT E.

A SCOTTISH FRAGMENT.

As this fine morsel of heroic poetry hath generally paft for ancient, it is here. thrown to the end of our earliet pieces ; that such as doubt of its age may the better compare it with other pieces of genuine antiquity. For after all, there is more than reason to suspect, that most of its beauties are of modern date ; and that these at least (if not its whole existence) have flowed from the pen of a lady, within this prefent century. The following particulars may be depended on.

One

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