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Who hath woe? who hath sorrow? who hath contentions ? who hath babbling? who hath wounds without cause ? who hath redness of eyes? They that tarry long at the wine; they that go to seek mixed wine. Look not thou upon the wine when it is red, when it giveth his colour in the cup, when it moveth itself aright: at the last it biteth like a serpent, and stingeth like an adder (xxiii. 29–32).

OF THE RIGHTEOUS AND THE WICKED. The curse of the Lord is in the house of the wicked: but he blesseth the habitation of the just (iii. 33).

The memory of the just is blessed: but the name of the wicked shall rot (x. 7).

The hope of the righteous shall be gladness; but the expectation of the wicked shall perish (x. 28).

The righteous is delivered out of trouble, and the wicked cometh in his stead (xi. 8).

When it goeth well with the righteous, the city rejoiceth; and when the wicked perish there is shouting (xi. 10).

Though hand join in hand, the wicked shall not be unpunished: but the seed of the righteous shall be delivered (xi. 21).

The righteous is more excellent than his neighbour: but the way of the wicked seduceth them (xii. 26).

A good man leaveth an inheritance to his children's children; and the wealth of the sinner is laid up for the just (xiii. 22).

The sacrifice of the wicked is an abomina. tion to the Lord : but the prayer of the upright is his delight (xv. 8).

OF KINGS AND SUBJECTS. Righteousness exalteth a nation ; but sin is a reproach to any people (xiv. 34).

The king's favour is toward a wise servant : but his wrath is against him that causeth shame (xiv. 35).

The king's heart is in the hand of the Lord, as the rivers of water: he turneth it whither. soever he will (xxi. l).

The horse is prepared against the day of battle: but safety is of the Lord (xxi. 31)."

It is the glory of God to conceal a thing; but the honour of kings is to search out a matter (xxv. 2).

Take away the wicked from before the king, and his throne shall be established in righteous. ness (xxv. 5).

As a roaring lion, and a ranging bear; so is a wicked ruler over the poor people (xxviii. 15).

OF JUSTICE AND INJUSTICE. A false balance is abomination to the Lord : but a just weight is his delight (xi. l).

He that justifieth the wicked, and he that condemneth the just, even they both are abomination to the Lord (xvii. 15).

To do justice and judgment is more ac. ceptable to the Lord than sacrifice (xxi, 3).

Remove not the old land-mark; and enter not into the fields of the fatherless: for their Redeemer is mighty; he shall plead their cause with thee (xxiii. 10, 11).

OF THE RICH AND POOR. The blessing of the Lord, it maketh rich; and he addeth no sorrow with it (x. 22).

The poor is hated even of his own neighbour: but the rich hath many friends (xiv. 20).

Whoso stoppeth his ears at the cry of the poor, he also shall cry himself, but shall not be heard (xxi. 13).

The rich and poor meet together; the Lord is the maker of them all (xxii. 2).

The rich ruleth over the poor, and the borrower is servant to the lender (xxii. 7).

The rich man is wise in his own conceit; but the poor that hath understanding searcheth him out (xxviii. 11).

OF COVETOUSNESS AND CONTENTMENT. Better is little with the fear of the Lord, than great treasure and trouble therewith (xv. 16).

Labour not to be rich; cease from thine own wisdom. Wilt thou set thine eyes upon that which is not ? for riches certainly make themselves wings; they fly away as an eagle toward heaven (xxiii. 4, 5).

A faithful man shall abound with blessings: but he that maketh haste to be rich shall not be innocent (xxviii. 20).

OF SLOTUFULNESS AND DILIGENCE. Go to the ant, thou sluggard; consider her ways, and be wise: which, having no guide, overseer, or ruler, provideth her meat in the summer, and gathereth her food in the harvest (vi. 6–8).

The soul of the sluggard desireth, and hath nothing: but the soul of the diligent shall be made fat (xiii. 4).

A slothful man hideth his hand in his bosom, and will not so much as bring it to his mouth again (xix. 24).

The sluggard will not plough by reason of the cold; therefore shall he beg in harvest, and have nothing (xx, 4).

Seest thou a man diligent in his business? he shall stand before kings; he shall not stand before mean men (xxii. 29).

The slothful man saith, There is a lion in the way; a lion is in the streets (xxvi. 13).

OF PRUDENCE AND FOOLISHNESS. A prudent man concealeth knowledge: but the heart of fools proclaimeth foolishness

(xii. 23).

Go from the presence of a foolish man, when thou perceivest not in him the lips of know. ledge (xiv, 7).

The wisdom of the prudent is to understand his way: but the folly of fools is deceit (xiv. 8).

The foolishness of man perverteth his way; and his heart fretteth against the Lord (xix. 3).

A prudent man foreseetb the evil, and hideth himself: but the simple pass on, and are pun. ished (xxii. 3).

Withdraw thy foot from thy neighbour's house; lest he be weary of thee, and so hate thee (xxv. 17).

Answer not a fool according to his folly, lest thou also be like unto him (sxvi. 4).

OF SELF-CONCEIT, Most men proclaim every one his own goodness : but a faithful man who can find ? (xx. 6).

Seest thou a man wise in his own conceit? there is more hope of a fool than of him(xxvi. 12).

As the fining pot for silver, and the furnace for gold; so is a man to his praise (xxvii. 21).

He that trusteth in his own heart is a fool : but whoso walketh wisely, he shall be delivered (xxviii. 26).

OF ENVY. Envy thou not the oppressor, and choose none of his ways (iii. 31). - A sound heart is the life of the flesh: but envy the rottenness of the bones (xiv. 30).

Let not thine heart envy sinners; but be thou in the fear of the Lord all the day long (xxiii. 17).

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