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the hand that can serve God in all; and the heart that can bless God for all; and I will give you a grateful man in return.

He who receives a benefit without being grateful, robs the giver of his just reward.

It is the character of an ungrateful nature, to write injuries in marble, and benefits in dust.

Ingratitude is directly opposed to nature, for benefits and kindness have softened lions.

An ungrateful man is detested by all, and an enemy to all those who stand in need of assistance.

OF ANGER AND REVENGE. To be able to bear provocation is a proof of great wisdom; and to forgive it of a great mind.

Anger is a sort of fever in the soul, which always leaves a man weaker than it found him,

If it be difficult to control thine anger, it is thy wisdom to prevent it.

A passionate temper deprives a man of his reason, and turns all order into confusion.

As the whirlwind in its fury teareth up trees, 80 the rage of an angry man casteth mischief around him.

A mild answer to an angry man abateth his heat; and from an enemy he shall become thy friend.

Harbour not revenge in thy breast, for it will torment thine heart, and warp its best inclinations.

By taking revenge a man is but even with his enemy, but in passing it over he is his superior. OF DETRACTION AND SLANDER. He that praises bestows a favour, but he who detracts commits a robbery.

Rest satisfied with doing well, and leave others to say of you what they please.

Slanderers are like flies, they leap over all a man's good parts, that they may alight upon his sores.

The worthiest of people are most injured by slanderers, as we generally find that to be the best fruit which the birds have been picking at.

A good man openeth not his ears unto slander; the failing of his neighbour breaketh his rest.

OF TRUTH AND LYING. Truth is always confident with itself, and needs nothing to help it out.

There is a kind of magic in truth, which generally carries the mind along with it.

As there is nothing more daring than truth,so there is nothing more confident than innocence.

Sincerity of heart and integrity of life, are the greatest ornaments of human nature.

An honest man is believed without an oath, because his reputation swears for him.

Since speech is the great gift which distinguishes us from the beasts, we ought never to degrade it by falsehood.

A liar is subject to these two misfortunes, neither to believe nor to be believed.

OF ATHEISM AND INFIDELITY. The foundation of all religion lies in these two things, namely, that there is a God who made and rules the world, and that the souls of men are capable of subsisting after death.

God never wrought a miracle to convince an atheist, because his works are sufficient for this purpose.

It is much easier to believe all the fables of the Alcoran, than that this universal frame should be without a Creator and Governor.

There never was a man who said, “There is no God,” but he wished it first.

There never was such a thing since the fall, as what some men call the religion of nature; that is a religion without a Saviour.

He who walks only by the light of nature, walks in darkness; and knows not upon what be shall stumble.

There is not such a ridiculous animal in Gud's world, as an infidel in his retirement.

When once infidelity has persuaded men that they shall die like beasts, it will soon persuade them that they may live like beasts also.

Whoever believes himself free from the obligation of the divine precepts, cannot look upon himself as bound by any human laws.

Though hell be generally acknowledged as the receptacle of all wickedness, yet so great a monster as a speculative infidel never was por ever will be found there.

As infidelity is the greatest sin, so, for God to give a man up to it, is the greatest punishment.

OF COMPANY AND CONVERSATION. The greatest wisdom of speech is to know when, how, what, and where to speak.

The first ingredient in conversation is truth; the second, good sense; the third, good humour; and the last, wit.

If you think twice before you speak once, you will speak twice the better for it.

The man who knows properly how to converse, hath an instrument in his possession with which he may do much good, and it will make him welcome in every company.

You should accommodate yourself to the capacity of those with whom you converse; for the discourse of some men is like the stars, which give a small light because they are so high.

Toinform, and to be informed, should be the end of all conferences.

Always let your conversation be intellectual, discreet, affectionate, and edifying.

The value of things is not their size, but their quality; so reason, when wrapt in a few words, has the greatest weight.

As a topic of conversation, introduce yourself as little as possible; for we are all in danger of doing this to our own hurt.

He that makes himself the jester of a company, has just wit enough to be a fool.

Many may be pleased with a jester, but can

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never esteem him; for a merry fellow is the saddest fellow in the world.

Learned men do not usually make a figure in conversation; for, though they possess its gold, they frequently want its small change.

Much talk, and much judgment, seldom go together.

Empty vessels make the greatest sound, and tinkling cymbals the worst music.

There are braying men in the world, as well as braying asses; for what is loud and senseless talking, swearing, and jesting, but a more fashionable way of braying?

Remember that every word you speak wings its way to the throne of God, and shall affect the condition of your soul to all eternity.

OF THE GREAT AND HONOURABLE. When thou esteemest a man merely for his titles, and condemnest the virtuous because he wanteth them, judgest thou not of the camel by his bridle ?

It is true greatness that constitutes glory, and virtue is the cause of both.

A generous openness of heart, a calm de. liberate courage, and a prompt zeal for the public interest, are at once the constituent parts of true greatness, and the best evidences of it.

It is not the place that makes the person honourable, but the person that makes the

place so.

Titles of honour conferred upon those who

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