Memoir on the Comparative Grammar of Egyptian, Coptic & Ude

Framsida
London, 1873 - 31 sidor
 

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Sidan 11 - I will also mention." 5 See chap 35. nations ; but the Colchian linen is called by the Greeks Sardonic, though that which comes from Egypt is called Egyptian. 106. As to the pillars which Sesostris king of Egypt erected in the different countries, most of them are evidently no longer in existence, but in Syrian Palestine I myself saw some still remaining, and the inscriptions before mentioned still on them, and the private parts of a woman. There are also in...
Sidan 10 - I heard it from others ; and as it was a matter of interest to me I inquired of both people, and the Colchians had more recollection of the Egyptians than the Egyptians had of the Colchians ; yet the Egyptians said that they thought the Colchians were descended from the army of Sesostris ; and I formed my conjecture, not only because they are swarthy and curly-headed, for this amounts to nothing, because others are so likewise, but chiefly from the following circumstances, because the Colchians,...
Sidan 11 - ... such precise and cogent reasons for them, that I am convinced there is an element of truth in his contention. " For the Colchians were evidently Egyptians, and I say this having myself observed it before I heard it from others ; and as it was a matter of interest to me I inquired of both people, and the Colchians had more recollection of the Egyptians than the Egyptians of the Colchians ; yet the Egyptians said they thought the Colchians were descended from the army of Sesostris ; and I formed...
Sidan 10 - . continent, until, having crossed from Asia into Europe, he subdued the Scythians and Thracians : to these the Egyptian army appears to me to have reached, and no farther ; for in their country the columns appear to have been erected, but no where beyond them. From thence, wheeling round, he went back again ; and when he arrived at the river Phasis, I am unable after this to say with certainty, whether king Sesostris himself, having detached a portion of his army, left them there to settle in that...
Sidan 10 - ... as the Egyptians. But of the Egyptians and Ethiopians, I am unable to say which learnt it from the other, for it is evidently a very ancient custom. And this appears to me a strong proof that the Phoenicians learnt this practice through their intercourse with the Egyptians, for all the Phoenicians who have any commerce with Greece no longer imitate the Egyptians in this usage, but abstain from circumcising their children.
Sidan 11 - ... of them are evidently no longer in existence ; but in Syrian Palestine I myself saw some still remaining, and the inscriptions before mentioned still on them, and the private parts of a woman. There are also in Ionia two images of this king, carved on rocks, one on the way from Ephesus to Phocaea, the other from Sardis to Smyrna. In both places, a man is carved four cubits and a half high, holding a spear in his right hand, and in his left a bow, and the rest of his equipment in unison ; for...
Sidan 9 - I shall proceed to make mention of the king that came after them, whose name was Sesostris/ The priests said that he was the first who, setting out in ships of war from the Arabian Gulf, subdued those nations that dwell by the Red Sea ; until sailing onwards, he arrived at a sea which was not navigable on account of the shoals ; and afterwards, when he came back to Egypt, according to the report of the priests, he assembled a large army, and marched through the continent, subduing every nation...
Sidan 10 - And these are the only nations that are circumcised, and thus appear evidently to act in the same manner as the Egyptians. But of the Egyptians and Ethiopians, I am unable to say which learnt it from the other, for it is evidently a very ancient custom. And this appears to me a strong proof that the Phoenicians...
Sidan 31 - Caucasians are no longer black, needs little space in explanation. While the languages have in some cases resisted the invasions of the Georgians, Armenians, Greeks, Persians, and Turks, constant intermarriages with the invaders have replaced the aboriginal types, but not without bearing evidences of survival. The study of the Ude language and population, as well as that of others in the Caucasus, is of great importance in all historical investigations, because it will greatly assist in laying better...
Sidan 11 - In both places a man is carved, four and a half cubits high, bearing a spear in his right hand, and in his left a bow ; and the rest of his equipment is in unison, for it is partly Egyptian and partly Ethiopian. From one shoulder to the other there extend across the breast sacred Egyptian characters, incised, which read as follows : " I acquired this region by my own shoulders.

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