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A.D. 1535, 1536. 27 AND 28 HENRY VIII.

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Fisher made cardinal — The king enraged thereat-Bishop Fisher's birth

and breeding. Different characters of Fisher-Variance betwixt papists

about Fisher's wealth-He welcomes the news of his death ; yet labours

to preserve his life; prepareth himself for his death-He advanceth to

the place of his execution ; the manner of his mounting the scaffold;

his speech to the people ; his execution ; his age and stature-His

mean, not to say (if true) barbarous burial, an impudent, improbable

lie-Sir Thomas More's extraction and education : charged for his

over-much jesting : a great anti-protestant- The death and character

of queen Catherine dowager — The character of queen Ann Boleyn-

The first reformed convocation—The silence in the abbots of the con.

vocation. The journal of this convocation-Cranmer solemnly divorceth

Anna Boleyn from the king. What might be the king's designs in

this divorce—The convocation buxom to please the king in all things

-A catalogue of erroneous opinions complained of in the convocation

- Erroneous opinions (as then accounted) complained of in the con-

vocation-Distempered expressions partly excused—Two contrary par-

ties in the convocation—The protestant bishops' moderation vindicated

- The draught of the twilight religion, confirmed in this convocation-

The convocation dissolved, and what acted in parliament - The birth,

breeding, first persecution, and far travelling of William Tindal. He

translateth the New and most part of the Old Testament; faults in his

translation confessed and excused–Tyndal and bis translation both

martyred with fire. A parallel betwixt St. Paul and Tyndal. Pages

58-91.

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An eminent instance of his humility-Men of different judgment meet-

ing at their death-A statute made for the recovery of tithes-Acts of

this year's convocation-Words in the Testament which Gardiner

desired might be preserved entire in the translation—The papists' plot

therein-Cranmer stickleth for the universities' approbation—The six

articles somewhat mitigated. The acts of the last parliament in this

king's reign-The original of stews. The regulation of the stews.

The impossibility to legitimate what in itself is unlawful-Argument

pro and con about stews--Prelates' loss by pomp-The character of

Anne Ashcough. Her plea for leaving her husband. She is first

racked, and then burned. Her prose and poetry—The king marrieth

Catherine Parr. The conspiracy of her enemies against her, by God's

providence, defeated-Parsons's wild intelligence- Testamentum Regis
Henrici VIII. Names of the executors-Wben this will was made-
Legacies scarcely paid— Monument made for the king by the cardinal
-Why his nicces more at liberty than his daughters—Ten thousand
pounds the portion of a princess-Much of arbitrariness in this will
The Scottish line quite left out—Legatees witnesses in king's will.
Little of his will performed-His disease and the manner of his death.,
His hope expressed by speechless gesture-Lying Slanders-His vices
and virtues-Why king Henry's monument never perfected-Cardinal
Pole's project--The bones of king Henry abused. Pages 91-133,

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Carmelites; and praise of their industry-The legend of Simon Stock
-Augustinian hermits–Trinitarian friars-Bons hommes, or good men
-Their rich revenues-Crouched (Crutched] friars-Friars of the sack
and Bethlemites-Friars Robertines. Sweating moisture out of tombs
no miracle-Why so various the number of monks—A catholic's cause-
less accusation of Mr. Lambert justly disproved-Antipathy betwixt
friars and parish-priests, in Erasmus's jest-earnest dialogue. Monks,
why hating friars-Friars stinted to four orders—The numerousness of
nuns. The ancientest and poorest nuns. Bridgetteans the last order
of nuns—The mystical number of Bridgetteans—The prioresses of Cler-
kenwell-A good exchange-Exactness in dates not to be expected. A

pleasant story-Jesuats different from Jesuits—Jesuits the best but-

tresses of the Romish church. Jesuits' policy. In England like astro-

logers in Rome-Leprous people not mentioned herein. Pages 140

-166.

I. ABBEYS ENGROSSED TRADE, IMPOVERISHED PARISH-PRIESTS,

RAGED OFFENDERS : Abbuts, farmers, tanners, brewers--Abbots rob

parish vicars, by appropriations; and other priests from exemption

from tithes—Freedom from tithes goeth by favour ; confined to lands

given before the Lateran Council. Offend none in a captious age-A

prize in the hand, but no heart-Sanctuaries sewers of sin. The con-

scientious abbot of Crowland—II. Of The

OFFICINES OF ABBEYS : The abbot; the prior; the sub-prior; the

secretary; the chamberlain ; the cellarer-The gate-house; the refec-

tory; the parlour ; the oriol ; the dormitory; the laundry; the library;

the kitchen–The several parts in the church—The century; the

firmory; the stables ; the gaol; the grange-Barbarous names and

offices. Rooms in small, houses in great abbeys. The use of cells,

'The honours in Canterbury priory-III. Some GENERAL Conformities

OBSERVED IN ALL CONVENTS : Rules calculated for the Benedictines

without any grand error will serve all orders--IV. Of such ABBOTS

WHO ATTAINED TO BE PARLIAMENTARY BARONS : Numerous abbots

summoned to parliarnent; who afterwards decline their troublesome

service - Their number contracted to twenty-six. Doubtful barons

amongst the abbots-A short-lived barony made by king Henry VIII.

-- Abbesses no baronesses, though holding baronies-Prior of Jeru-

salem chief baron. Next, the abbot of St. Alban's—The careless order

of the rest. Seniority not observed in the summons; nor ranked by

their wealth. 'Tewkesbury to be added to the catalogue-Some abbots

mot barons richer than those that were- -Shaftesbury the richest nun-

nery-A profane proverb. No country free from monks. Query,

What meant by four abbots peculiarly exempt–V. OF THE CIVIL

BEYEFITS, AND TEMPORAL CONVENIENCES, ACCRUING TO THE STATE

BY TẬE CONTINUANCE OF ABBEYS : Give abbeys their due; they con-

venient to dispose youngest children in; an eminent instance thereof-

Children taught therein. Conveniency of she-colleges—Monks the

sole bistorians, and why-Abbots excellent landlords, and admirable

housekeepers–Objection against their hospitality. The same answered

--Ely puts all abbeys down for feasting-A pleasant story of king Henry

19

I. OF CARDINAL WOLSEY'S OMINOUS SUPPRESSING OF FORTY LESSER MO-

NASTERIES, THEREWITH TO BUILD TWO COLLEGES : Wolsey's wealth

and want. Wolsey's act justly censured-Fig-leaves to cover it, in

vain. The miserable ends of the cardinal's instruments herein-II. Op

THE FIRST PRIORY WHICH WAS SOLEMNLY SUPPRESSED BY KING HENRY

VIII.: Christ-Church priory near Aldgate first and solely dissolved.

The antiquity, wealth, and dignity thereof-A guess at king Henry's

design. The priory taken by composition ; the effect thereof upon the

people-This the ancientest of all priories ; at this day called the

Duke's Place-III. OF THE SUPPRESSION OF the Order or OBSER-

VANT FRIARS, AND A PREPARATORY FOR THE

THE REST : Observant friars, why first falling under king Henry's dis-

pleasure : totally and finally dissolved-The supplication of beggars,

with the sense thereof. The geometry, arithmetic, and chronology of

the author thereof—The anti-supplication of the souls in purgatory-

The first supplication best received—IV. The LESSER MONASTERIES

BESTOWED ON THE KING: A gainful motion made for the king :

reported, by mistake, opposed by bishop Fisher ; easily passed in par-

liament--A preamble of importance restored out of the records to the

printed statute. Two principles which must not be questioned-Exact

measuring to the standard of dissolution. Many aged persons at a

loss for livelihood. Abbey-lands politicly scattered among many pur-

chasers. The number of the lesser monasteries—Why the king cajoleth

the great monasteries. Specious uses pretended on heavy penalties.

Such penalties graciously repealed by king James. Some grudge at so

great a grant-V. THE NORTHERN REBELLION OCCASIONED BY THIS

DISSOLUTION : Northern rebellion begun, suppressed, punished; ex-

çused by Sanders unjustly—Persons executed-VI. The return of

THE VISITORS OF ABBEYS : The return of the lord Cromwell's agents.

The principal commissioners-Their two-edged sword. Monks weary

of their lives-VII. THE SECOND SORT OF INSINUATING EMISSARIES :

Others undone by their own dissensions. A charitable censure-VIII.

SOLICITING AND TEMPTING

COMPLAINED OF

PAPISTS : A devilish design, if true. A memorable story: sin plot, sin

pay for. Application as far as concerns the matter in hand- A com-

plaint of the papists; a sad story, if true. The pedigree of this tradi-

tion-IX. SOME CONVENTS ON EXAMINATION APPEARING VERY VIR-

TUOUS: Some convents retaining their primitive piety; but too few to

preserve the rest-X. THE GENERALITY OF MONASTERIES NOTORIOUSLY

VICIOUS : Charitable premisses. Read, and blush, and sigh-A coltish

trick served upon the monks of Waltham. More talk than truth of

under-ground vaults-Provision made for their lust. Charity best in

doubtful evidence-A Sodom in Sion nunnery-XI. ABBOTS wil.

LINGLY-UNWILLING RESIGNED THEIR MONASTERIES TO

Monks, persuaded into a resignation, strive who should be the fore-

most-The surrender of the warden and friars of St. Francis in Stan-
ford-A more humble form of surrender--Betwixt first and last no

great difference-XII. THE SEAL OF ARMS OF THE MITRED ABBEYS

in ENGLAND: The design of the work. The arms of Tavistock, of

Glastonbury, of Middleton, of Malmsbury, of Abingdon, of Reading,

of Hide, of Battle, of St. Augustine, of Gloucester, of Tewkesbury, of

Winchcomb, of Cirencester, of St. Alban's, of St. John's of Jerusalem,

of Waltham, of ('olchester, of Bury, of St. Benet's, of Thorney, of
Ramsey, of Peterborough, of Crowland, of Bardoey and Evesham, of
Shrewsbury, of Selby, of York-XIII. THE LORD Darcy's EXTRAC-
TION JUSTLY VINDICATED: A causeless aspersion grounded on passion.
What the lord Marney was—Three noble branches of the Darcyes in
the north-Thomas lord Darcy-XIV. The ANCIENT English NOBI-
LITY GREAT LOSERS BY THE DISSOLUTION OF ABBEYS : Ancient nobi.
lity losers. Good rents ill paid. Services wholly lost, with the com-
modity of corrodies-XV. THE PREMISSES PROVED BY INSTANCE IN
THE FAMILY OF The Berkeleys: Robert Derby, last abbot of Crox-

ton-XVI. INGRATITULE TO THEIR FOUNDERS, 4 GRAND FAULT IN

MANY ABBEYS: If unthankful, all bad-Great bounty ill-requited.

Summum jus—Another instance of ingratitude-A cause of their ruin.

An over-wise conceit easily confuted. Strong faith to believe so much

of king Henry's charity. Pages 200-237.

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