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contrary, the army reorganization bill produced money he would receive in Turin; and a year a new estrangement. (See HUNGARY.)

had scarcely elapsed before he had made him. Of the many nationalities inhabiting Austria, solf a name in Rome as an artist. After a resiaone was more satisfied with the policy of the dence of eight years in that city, during which Austrian Government than the Poles of Galicia. he added history to the study of painting, he An enthusiastic Pole, Count Goluchowski, was returned to Turin, and on the death of his (in October) appointed Governor-General of father, in 1830, went to Milan for the further Galicia, and, to the great delight of the Poles, prosccution of his art. Here he formed an acthe Provincial Diet of Galicia was, for the first quaintance with Alessandro Manzoni, whose time, opened in the Polish language. The Gov- daughter he married, and from this time began ernment also discontinued the publication of to make himself known in literature, his novels, the official papers, published in the German lan- Ettore Fieramosco (1833), and Niccolo di Lapi guage, in Cracow and Lemberg. So well were (1841), having done much to fire the national the Poles pleased with this policy, that many spirit of the Italians. The latter work has began to dream and talk of the restoration of been praised as the best historical novel in any Poland under an Austrian archduke. But while language. The political affairs of Italy soon highly gratifying to the Poles, this policy greatly occupied him exclusively; he traversed the irritated the Ruthenians, another Slavic tribe in provinces, cities, and villages, seeking to stir up Galicia, constituting more than one-half of the the spirit of patriotism, and to conciliate the population of that province, though the Poles are unhappy party divisions, and was everywhere the ruling and controlling class. The sittings of received with rejoicing and acclamation. While the Galician Diet were frequently the scene of in Florence he wrote his famous Degli Ultimi violent discussions between the two races. The Casi di Romagna; in which he lashed the PaRuthenians were virtually placed by the Gov- pal Government, denounced the vain attempts ernment under Polish control, and, notwith- at insurrection, and proved to the Italian standing their violent protestations, had their princes the necessity of a national policy. schools and churches handed over to Polish After the election of Pius IX, as pope, Azeglio direction. The Poles, delighting in being able returned to Rome, and to his influence was asto repay, to a certain extent, to the Ruthenians cribed the reforms with which Pius began his what their countrymen in Russia suffered at government. During this time he wrote much Russian lands, have restricted the use of the on public questions, and subsequently the whole Ruthenian language in the schools, and, in an of his political writings, collected in one voladdress of the Galician Parliament to the em- ume, appeared at Turin. When Charles Alperor, asked for permission to continue, and even bert, after the rising of Lombardy, crossed the, go further, in limiting the same. The cause Ticino, Azeglio left Rome with the papal troops of the Ruthenians is espoused with great zeal destined to support the Italian contest. In the by the Russian Government and people, whose battle of Vicenza, where he commanded a ledisposition toward Austria was consequently gion, he was severely wounded while fighting any thing but friendly.

at the head of his troops, and scarcely was he AZEGLIO, MASSIMO TAPARELLI, Marquis recovered when with his pen he courageously D', an Italian statesman, thor, and artist, opposed the republican party, now intoxicated born at Turin in October, 1801; died at Turin, with victory. Having fought for his country, January 15, 1866. He was descended from an he was now called to the far more difficult task ancient and noble family of Piedmont, his of shaping the policy which was to preservo father holding a high position under the gov- life and liberty to Piedmont. On the opening ernment, and editing the conservative paper of the Sardinian Parliament, he was chosen a L'Amico d'Italia. Young Massimo spent his member of the Chamber of Deputies, and in first seven years in Florence, where he learned 1849 the young king, Victor Emanuel II., appure Italian speech and manners. In 1814, his pointed him President of the Cabinet, an office father being appointed ambassador to Rome, he undertook solely from love to his king and he accompanied him thither, and there con- his country. On the one hand, treaties wero tracted a love for the fine arts; but his study to be made with Austria, and on the other the of music and painting was interrupted by his republican elements of Piedmont-most violent father procaring him an appointment in a Pied- in Genoa-were to be tranquillized. Azeglio montese cavalry regiment. Here he devoted succeeded in not only quelling the Genoese, but all his leisure with such intensity to scientific in persuading his countrymen to acquiesce in pursuits, that he brought on an illness which the treaty ratifying the defeat of Novara; and obliged him to retire from the service. After by skilfully temporizing with the enemies of the embassy was concluded, he returned to peace without and within, he restored the Turin with his father, and there entered upon kingdom to security and quiet. To him was a course of severe and earnest study; and be- due in a great measure the preservation of the coming satisfied that it was his destiny to be only constitution of the many granted in 1848, a painter, succeeded finally in obtaining parental and his Fabian policy was the only real hope permission to return to Rome and lead his artist- of Italy. The press remained free in Piedlife, if he chose, on condition that he would ex- mont, and the inviolability of political asylum pect for his full support no more than the pocket- was maintained. Patriots were attracted from

VOL. VI.-4

A

all parts of the Peninsula to Turin, and that The immediate cause of the Marquis d'Azeg. sentiment of national unity created which, when lio's death was a fever taken by remaining toc Cavour came to relieve D'Azeglio, was made late in the season at his villa near Turin. He the foundation of the new Italian kingdom. In aggravated the disorder, after returning to the November, 1852, he left the cabinet, and for city, by writing constantly on his memoirs, but seven years remained in private life. In March, his case was not considered alarming until 1859, he was sent to England on a special em- within a week before his death. A few days bassy, and on his return accepted the temporary later he was visited by the Prince of Carignano presidency of the Romagna; undertook, after and the Admiral Persano, whom he recognized, the peace of Villafranca, a confidential mission saying, “Thanks, thanks! I have been a faithto England; and afterward the post of governor ful servant to the house of Savoy." Others of of the city of Milan. Ill-health, love of art, the great and noble from every part of Italy the desire for the retirement and pursuits ac- came to take leave of him, and, although sufcordant with his tastes and habits, and some fering acutely, he received all graciously, and differences of opinion with his colleagues, was in such perfect possession of his faculties caused him finally to withdraw from public as to be able to speak to each in the dialect of life. He spent the greater part of his last years his province. in that pleasant Tuscan capital which he loved It is related that one morning, shortly before so well, with no other labor to employ him his death, he heard the rehearsal of music for a but the preparation of his memoirs, which he mass in a chapel near his house, and observed has left only half completed. These will, no quietly: “They are preparing for me the music donbt, add greatly to the riches of a literature of the mass; very well! It is beautiful and already opulent in autobiography, and will form well done." Among his latest words were: a precious contribution to the history of the “Non posso far niente per l'Italia !" (I can most important events of our time.

do nothing more for Italy).

BADEN, a grand duchy in South Germany. General Harrison to the Presidency, and on Grand Duke Friedrich, born September 9, 1826; the accession of that officer to the chair, Mr. succeeded his father Leopold, as regent, on April Badger was appointed Secretary of the Navy. 24, 1852; assumed the title of grand duke on On the death of President Harrison, and the September 5, 1856. Area, 1,712 square miles; separation of Mr. Tyler from the Whig party, population in 1864, 1,429,199 inhabitants (of Mr. Badger resigned, giving the veto of Presiwhom 933,476 were Catholics; 472,258 mein- dent Tyler on the second Bank Bill as his bers of the United Evangelical Church; 25,263 reason. The Whigs of North Carolina reJews). The capital, Carlsruhe, had, in 1860, warded the devotion of Badger by returning 30,367 inhabitants. The receipts of the financial him at the first opportunity to the Senate. He year 1863–64 amounted to 18,920,463 florins, was elected to fill a vacancy in 1846, and in and the expenditures to 18,132,693 florins. 1848 reëlected for a full term. In 1853 PresiThe army, on the peace footing, is 7,908; and dent Fillmore nominated him as a Judge of the on the war footing, 18,402 men. The Grand United States Supreme Court, but the Senate Duke of Baden inade special efforts to avert a refused to confirm the nomination. At the excivil war in Germany, and when he was unsuc- piration of his term of office, he retired from cessful took part, with great reluctance, in the public life, and devoted himself wholly to his war. Baden is one of the States which were profession. In February, 1861, when the not to form part of the North German Confed- proposition to hold a convention for the pureration, but were left at liberty to form a South pose of seceding from the Union was submitGerman Confederation. At the close of the year ted to the people of his State, he consented to both the government and a majority of the two serve as a Union candidate if the convention Chambers expressed a desire to be received into should be called. The proposition was, howthe North German Confederation.

ever, defeated by the people; but when in May, BADGER, Hon. GEORGE EDMUND, an Ameri- 1861, the convention was finally called, ho can statesman, born at Newbern, N, O., April served in it as a representative from Wake 13, 1795 ; died at Raleigh, N. O., May 11, 1866. County. Ho spoke ably in defence of the He graduated at Yale College in 1813, and Union, and after the ordinance of secession studied law in Raleigh, where he early became was passed, was known as a member of the distinguished for solidity and strength in his Conservative party. Mr. Badger was a vigorprofession. In 1816 he was elected to the ous speaker, but writing was ever irksome to State Legislature, and devoted the next four him. “I will do any thing toward making a years of his life to law and legislation. From speech," he would say, “but I cannot write." 1820 to 1825 he was Judge of the North Caro. As a lawyer he was seldom surpassed. In delina Superior Court at Raleigh. In 1840 hebate he excelled in the precision with which was a prominent advocate of the election of he could draw a nice distinction. He was pos

sessed of a considerable vein of wit and humor, 1846, he was again married, to Miss Isabella which, though perhaps dry and classical, was Robertson, from Scotland, then engaged in always effective, and the debates of the Senate missionary labors at Canton, who was hig prove that he was a man of profound research. companion for the remainder of his life, and

BALL, Rev. Dyer, M. D., a Congregational survives him. His medical services here were clergyman and missionary of the A. B. O. F. M., of great assistance in conciliating the people. born at West Boylston, Mass., June 3, 1796; He taught a small school of boys, and contindied at Canton, China, March 27, 1866. When ued the superintendence of printing books and he was six years of age his family removed to tracts in Chinese, while his "Almanac” was for Shutesbury, Mass., and during a revival of re many years a most acceptable publication. Takligion at Hadley, where he was temporarily re- ing a few medicines and tracts, he would mingle ,siding, he became hopefully converted at the with the people, first on the banks of the river age of nineteen. His studies preparatory to and on the ferries, and then extending his visits the college course were pursued, in part, at to the villages and markets. In this way he Phillips Academy, and after two years at Yale became widely known and respected. College he was obliged to go South for his In February, 1854, Dr. Ball sailed, with his health. For a time he was tutor in a private family, for a visit to the United States, and was family, near Charleston, S. C., and his colle- absent from China until March 23, 1857, when giate education was not completed till 1826, he reached Macao on his return. His constituwhen he graduated at Union College. In 1827 tion was already much broken, and he was ever he was married to Miss Lucy Mills, of New after infirm, and suffered much from pain as Haven, Connecticut. He pursued theological well as weakness; but it was his choice to studies for a time at New Haven, and after- spend his declining years in the land of his ward at Andover, and was licensed to preach adoption, where two of his daughters, also, enin 1828, but was not ordained until 1831, at gaged in the missionary work; and while inShutesbury. In 1829 he was engaged in teach- firmities multiplied and pressed upon him, he ing a private school at St. Augustine, Florida; still did what he could. During the last seven and in 1833 he was appointed an agent of the years of his life, when not actually confined to Home Missionary Society, to labor in that his couch, he would slowly work his way downState. At this time, and during the whole of stairs, totter out to his little chapel, which his ministry South, he was much engaged in opened on the street, and there, seated in his labors for the good of the colored population. arm-chair, would distribute tracts and address We next find him teaching in an academy in a few words to the passers-by, working accordCharleston, S. O. In 1835, 1836, and 1837, ing to his strength. Few have carried into in addition to other engagements, he pursued the missionary field more energy and devotion the study of medicine, with reference to to the work than the subject of this sketch. foreign missionary work, and received the de BANKS. The first bank under the present gree of M. D. from the medical institution in law authorizing the establishment of National Charleston.

Banks in the United States, was organized in Dr. Ball is said to have been very popular June, 1863. At the close of 1866 the number and much beloved at the South, so that he was in active operation exceeded sixteen hundred, often urged to remain, and engage in evangelis- with an aggregate paid-up capital of over four tic labors among the colored population. He hundred millions, owned by more than two hunwas also eminently successful in teaching, and dred thousand stockholders. The system has his financial prospects in his school were most won the confidence of the people, and has furpromising, when he left it for labors as a mis- nished thus far a currency of uniform value in sionary of the American Board in the far East. all parts of the country. It has superseded all After coming North to go abroad, he was de- existing State banking institutions, and places tained a year in consequence of the commercial the entire control of the currency of the councrisis of that period, and during this time did try in the hands of the Federal Government. something toward the acquisition of the Chi- It has also proved, during its short existence, to nese language. He sailed, with his family and be a most important auxiliary in the financial with several other missionaries, from Boston, operations of the Treasury Department. For May 25, 1838, and arrived at Singapore on the Currency, Redemption, etc.

, see FINANCES U. S. 17th of September following. For something The increase of national bank circulation in the less than two years he was stationed at Singa- United States has been as follows: pore, “teaching, preaching, healing the sick, and superintending the printing of Chinese Legal tenders and small currency...

The national bank circulation, April, 1867, was $291,000,000

405,000,000 books." In June, 1841, he went to Macao, for

Total, April, 1867....

$696,000,000 à temporary change, on account of the ill

123,000,000 health of Mrs. Ball, and was providentially led Deduct, on band in the banks... to remain there until April, 1843, when he re

Net circulation, April, 1867.

$573,000,000

Bank circulation, United States, moved to Hong Kong. On the 6th of June,

January, 1862, was..

$189,000,000 1844, he was called to deep affliction by the Deduct, on hand in banks... 25,000,000 death of his excellent wife. In 1845 he re

$ 158,000.000 moved to Canton, and on the 26th of February, Increase in ve years.

$415,000,000

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CONDITION OF THE NATIONAL BANKS OF THE UNITED STATES, JANUARY 1, 1867.

LIABILITIES.
STATES AND TERRITORIES.
No. of Capital Stock

National Bank State Bank Individanl De-
Banke,
paid in.

United States Deposits of U. S. Due to Na Due to other
Sarplus Fund. notes outstanding. notes outstanding. posits. Deposits. Disburs’g Officers, tional Banks. Banks.

Profits. Aggregate.
Maine

61 $9,095,000 $639,109 $7,408,496 $113,668 $5,614,768 $385,677 $85,863 $135,951 $53,927
New Hampshire.
4,785,000

$665, 110
855,796
39

$24,186,967
4,116,765 95,672

2,052,603
874,850 128,676

955

589
Vermont.
29 6,460,000 295,536

252,271
5,665, 768

12,113,171
192,699 2,092,333 280,440

26,550
Massachusetts.

7,114 5,882
162 37,282,000

899,441 15.425, 765
4,849,603 81,115,987 705,124 19,714,116 1,869,502 25,215 369,648
42,550,000

160,160
Boston

45
6,613,312

2,467,270
25,265,836

98,558,629
328,895 41,084,527 990,213
Rhode Island.

13,802,668 1,856,898 2,670,702
62 20,364,800 '967,685 12,846,917

134,662,565
813,776 6,780,286 891,871 42,177

469,455
Connecticut..

716,034
24,584,220

758,814
82
8,171,152

43,151,318
17,252, 227 746,975 12,496,022 699,571 12,775 1,344,782
New York.
242 87,945,241

502,039 910,833
8,864.647

61,719,599
29,821,111 1,269,629 49,280,077 2,013,951 102,487
New York.

59
75,009,700

2,318,741 1,471,834 3,518,419 84,257,816 17,573,506

182,106,140 406,037 201,962,194 2,319,414 4,884 Albany. 8 3,000,000

52,466,889 13,278,398 4,870,196
6,810,000 2,202,822

402,149,036
72,045 9,612,459 166,813

7.911
54

1,779,798
New Jersey
11,233,350

853,574
1,761,102

576,532
8,998,350

18,453,005
422,638 14,843,324 746,661 55,764 1,403,734
Pennsylvania

155
24,158,615

183,178 863,880
8,111,811 20,898,641

40,011,993
893,883 24,489,050 1,169,840
15,942, 150
80

28,705
Philadelphia

1,380,067 283,283 1,018,243 76,882,141
5,178, 759 10,747,764 142,641 41,175,912 2,469,668

6,583,431
16
Pittsburg

825,109
9,000,000

1,022,834
1,161,732

84,088,271
6,662,670 343,325
8,988,981 852,600

482,626
Delaware

11
1,428,185

259,856 680,514 271,593

27,981,806 1,177,163 49,611 1,404,766 Maryland

51,096 20,895
2,448,217

184,538
19

28,617 77,059 4,692,826
266,237 1,686,037 99,867 2,523,913 46,049
Baltimore

125,864 104,386
10,191,985

16,002
18
1,128,542

146,119
6,942,985

7,462,194
500,045 11,233,180 396,506
District of Columbia,

860 1,406,973
1 '100,000

211,223 414,851 82,427,002 873 89,820

55,869 95,300

S22
Washington..
4 1,250,000

8,130 345,865
178,441 974,247

1,877,759 892,416
Virginia...
19

27,986 122,072 1,098,251 104,047
2,400,000

6,025,222
78,957 2,047,705
3,433,501 246,136

145,753 40,749
West Virginia.

191,025
15
2,216,400

175,562
128,824

8,759,391
1,975,210

7,514 2,661,260 182 894 47,142
547,750

107,675 49,320 189,148
North Carolina.

7,516,389
17,256 259,600

462,626 182,349
500,000

43,669 94,890
South Carolina.

20,016 20,596 1,598,756
1,950 126,000

1,038,486
Georgia

189,024 4,823
1,600,000 66,200

101,771 1,961,586
1,218,000
2,831,874 330,048

317,577
78,853

6,807
Alabama ...
500,000

134,227 6,078,559
12,289 262,475

1,178,713
Mississippi..

702,079

13,835 84,442 150,000 26,953

89.826 2,793,662
40,500

168,261
Louisiana
1,800,000

17,987 1,676

16,981

422,360
44,314 1,081,600

4,448,917

959,204
4
548,700

188,076 147,297

223,151
7,000

8,892,561
885,550

1,241,896 452,256
15,604,700

60,141 19,767
Ohio......

9,285
123

64,566 2,788,614
1,807,205 13,184,400 80,316
Cincinnati

15,237,877
4,000,000

1,051,293
45,575 850,485

266,244 751,111
8

47,879,209
619,653
3,263, 250
5,917,492 1,908,166

948
Cleveland
2,200,000

1,514,192 317,240 185,011
859,120

17,725,956
1,850,510

8,357,950 502,900
12,769,416

46,047
Indian.....

135 528

209,125
1,107,614

74,138 8734,421
10,999,789 10,793 7,021,828 542,845
Illinois

204,053
6,420,000

166,797 125,272 784,285 83,682,616
549,390 5,364,130

3,469 8,755,048 720,104 Chicago 5,200,000

134,489 18

64,885

63,769 526,261 22, 601,574 579,152 4,070,850

7,859,650 624,858 Michigan..... 35 3,435,000

2,071,920

21,768,082 265,289

956,818 400,836 2,860,979

2,100 3,367,545 Detroit 1,550,010

133,212 1,339 37,223 15,003 156,699 10,277,892 257,073 952,385

905 2,731,568

251,517 Wisconsin ...

82 2,085,000

209,298 148,433

63,844 61,709 6,226,745 166,863 1,860,555

5,772 8,323,223 118,017 Milwaukee 850,000

5,275 10,675 12.168 126,860 7,714,412 167,619 692,480

810 1,666,490 224,728
45

60,691
Iowa.
3,742,000 244,289

415,871 150,731 7,099 4,286,061
3,214,645 81,796 5,469,609 287,475
Minnesota.
15

86,684 78,104
1,660,000

115,257 815,473 13,555,336
76,180 1,475,632

9,123 1,756,228
Kansas

50,308

760 248,000

68,860 97,593 13,000

114,898

5,809,585
175,000
Missouri..

309,925 10,405 70,645 12,950
700,000

88,332
8
48,818

873,259
568,539

1,446,921
St. Louis.

55,728

9,636 5,540 8 6,789,300 1,410,521

46,714

2,881,948
1,889, 705 113,849 4,979,929
Arkansas

4,117,915 82,479
2

977,512
200,000

468,955
966, 710

18,040,753
10,000 179,495
Kentucky..

410,855 160,280 116,098
11
1,840,000

157,888
58,860

12,189 1,246,256
1,540,898

1,544,178 192,893
Louisville...

10,949
1,000,000

34,791
4

104,894 88,297 5,415,263
105,675 777,986

396,629 88,260
Tennessee..
11

144,768
1,750,000 137,290

83,634 24,589 2,571,543
1,128,497

4,871,569 185,654
1

20,663
155,000

80,724 15,043 198,588
2,825

9,888,080
129,000

67,547
Nubraska Territory
8

18,892 867,764
200,000 5,042 160,448

727,947 6,231 118,434 22,754 Colorado Territory..

8 350,000

2,614 68,791 1,212,263 22,209 226 570

713,640 38,624

22,781

09 92,480 1,461,860 Total liabilities. 1.614 $419,779,739 $59,967,222 $291,093,294 $6,961,499 $575,179,944 $27,225,663 $2,275,384 *92, 755,560 $24,822,614 $26,887,828 $1,506.448,245

[graphic]

CONDITION OF THE NATIONAL BANKS OF THE UNITED STATES, JANUARY 1, 1867.

ASSETS.
STATES AND

Real Estate,
Loans.
Espense

Due from
Premiums.

Due from

Bills of

Cash Items,
TERRITORIES

Bills of
ete.

Compound In- Other Lawful
Nat'l Banke. Other Banks. U. S. Bonds.
account.

Specie.
Nat'l Banks. other Banks.

terest Notes. Money.

Aggregates.
Maine
$10,215,944 $199,622 $19,869 $27,477 $300,916 $1,712,902 $53,377

$9,894,777 $242,275 $27,772 $83,190 $853,830

$24,186,967

$653,056
8,791,959
New Hampshire....

94,598 34,295 18.071 158,845 1,216,419 22,292 5,960,850 175,882 6,646 11,480 867,240 260,593

5,077,477
Vermont

12,113,171
110,458 34,127 49,912 135,988 1,201,222 81,176 7,680, 771 108,331 11,361 45,880 541,560 397,502
Massachusetts

15,425, 765
89,295,244 765,209 145,988 75,824 988,530 7,073,111 139,949 48,259,426 780,817 69,853 285,129 4,007,830 1,670,217 98,558,629
Boston..
62,891,110

28,723
431,351 280,750

5,058,972 6,271,454 284,974 86,068, 700 8,633,815 2,744 1,465,728 12,003,000 5,291,207 134,662,565 Rhode Island. 20,928,100 512,424 66,936 66 817

830,0.98 2,915,409 127,416 14,911,330 417,172 25,091 48,845 1,523,550 784,184 43,151,318 26,290,161 Connecticut .......

891,049 79,076 150,658 835,551 5,593,060 401,018 23,440,886 558,092 24,287 58,983,651

190,926 2,223,740 1,041,596 61,719,599 New York.....

453,893

283,274 217,547 2,312,424 11,878,688 626,720 45,121,180 1,047,616 187,460
157,967,294

834,388
626,857

5,801,550
New York

8,857,755 132,106,140
431,051 637,825 78.758,031 9,583,979 4,136,979 67,973,960 2,228,868
6,749,790

69,488 10,547,117) 22,785,940 41,402,117 402,149,036
Albany
237,045 11,855 8,652 1,028,123
8,949,947 208,450 8,715,822 187,061 105,474 19,108

476,110
1,756,080

18,453,005
17,708,056 543,690
New Jersey

95,831 82,445 613,727 4,475,125 424,499 12,839,016 493,397 29,166 150,997 1,445,1501 1,610,885 27,844,735 896,835 Pennsylvania

40,011,983 169,979 175,612 760,573 6,861,008

753,245 30,882,156 1,032,588 76,277 110,600 4,127,460 8,691,074 76,882,141 82,517,368 Philadelphia.. 1,074,419 125,797 332,549 1,754,379 3,839,274

729,368 19,958,829 1,152,383 88,026 943,896
11,651,516

14,212,994
Pittsburg

7.408,990

84,088,271
411,046 89,072
121,978 395,049 1,836,692 153,999 9,068,800 237,168

103,731
19,862

1,902,440
2,182 S12

1,990,955
108,164
Delaware...

27,931,806
14,895
10,817

81,227 814,591

26,826 1,602,141 80,825 13,872 8,849 138,920 158,887 4,692,326 2,698,662 Maryland .......

110,436 15,869

28,561 127,784 593,396 68,244 2,788,115 110,241

57,281 70,401 14,277,853

839,690 454,064 7,462,194 Baltimore 412,753 25,238 31,560 823,195 463,610 299,046 9,412,582 729,025

49,826

516,921 85,807

1,621,400 2,768,494 82,427,002 Dist't of Columbia..

10,700 15,623 8,956 14,669 3,538 177,450 6,774

81 442

18,626

7,900
1,388,706

845,3
Washington
215,084 12,817| 83,614 88,749 855,241

71,213
2,842,162
96,784

182 70,428 590,810 809 488 6,025,2 8,386,504 Virginia...

245,108 44,250 35,227 284,987 677,121 113,087 2,742,0391 317,586 2,582 107,578 210,580 2,317,743

592,804 8,759,391 West Virginia... 160,683 21,183 87,498 189,592 668,659 118,450 8,202,225 45,578 77,236

18,757

287,900 424,885 7,515,889 North Carolina.. 659,670 29,568 5,484 15,728 42,198 45,063

57,511 503,100 56,587 2,060 12,449 3,150 166,188 1,598, 756 South Carolina.. 852,935 2,005 20,636

101,528 829,716

36,196 178,650 157,681 14,995 17,646 8,510 246,108
1,989,644

1,961,556
Georgia

29,034 9,892 35,123

54,834 495,788 185,085 1,925,825

420,182 2,826 19,228 181,160 781,470 6,078,589 Alabama

556,855 13,712 1,482 463 849,189 66.140 93,522 641,900 10,308 8,990 75,757 6,500 473,893 2,793,662 Mississippi 145,058 18,598 4,935 2,054 1,194 47,038 4,030 95,000 12,838 4,010 5,914

81,697 422,860 2,519,816 Louisiana

208,018 4,376 50,028 611,430 571,400

830,159 1,820,400 444,961 66,523 157,404 67,080 1,540,966
878,201

8,892,561
Texas

22,177 32,128

11,078 20,612 641,558 95,247 687,050 75,121

878,826 79,870 366,745 2,788,614 Ohio 18,098, 770 509,499 135,617

93,614 468,301 8,012,874 677,720 18,901,499 598,069 51,164 71,615 2,302,080 8,078,888 47,879,209 Cincinnati, 6,754,464 112,239 36,003 5,495

182,788 1,030,650 106,186 6,816,800 278,091 5,557

21,686 685,750 745,248 17,725,956 Cleveland.

8,418,180 88,505 23,648 21,988 81,649 925,453 86,412 2,790,400 285,595 15,949 89,334 493,280 514,025 8,784,421

13,002,867 Indiana 434,466 67,988 62,240 214,744 1,351,621 249,981 14,868,387 295,007 105 69,741

1,519,110

2,081,490 83,682,646 8,462,246 335,966 89, 114 36,758 346,924 1,977,955 250,445 7,767,502 329,876 2,068 127,628 899,840 1,975,704 22, 601,574

8,490,827 Chicago.

29,085 43,966 17,210

1,642,503

2,012,070 104,554 5,450,496 777,202 1,078 62,539 1,841,720 1,800,883 21,763,082 Michigan ...

8,909,767 191,628 40,899 31,993 133,881 770,469 52,269 8,891,386 86,147 1,437 16,184 626,280

625,071 10,277,892 Detroit 2,797,245 60,635 16,800 1,607 169,584 573,588 86,145 1,505,850 136,882 4.980

667 844,020 579,292 6,226, 745 2,474,563 Wisconsin ..

127,202 12,883 36,762 64,971 1,052,696 77,655 2,680,650 89,143 757 18,897 899, 730 679,054 7,714,412 Milwaukee 1,619,194 66,394 222 14,344 247,009

413,167 16,851 1,144,800 20.173 348 11.813 351,510 880,326 4,236,051 4,704,243 Iowa..

187,186 49,887)

21,407 181,191 102,101 273,730 4,703,178 215,936 16,988 55,543 676,000

13,585,836

1,898,452
2,095,714
Minnesota
70,566 11,010 22,041 130,260 241,440 112,276 1,961,907 81,665

10,447 828,450 285,581 6,309,585
Kansas.....
199,461 20,900 12,072 11,160 26,704 98,891

5,909 348,050 53.461

1,620

87,161 878,259

7,870
Missouri.

859, 7301

88,506 6,861 19,448 56,286 282,475 48,077 1,071,700 63,189 24,851 82,335 158,760 219,730 2,881,948 St. Louis..

9,077,547) 366,040 106,406 77,562 50,742 519,716 442,248 4,894,900 662,062 37,121 262,903 860,260 1,183,251 18,040,758 Arkansas...

855,060

5,264 6,822 6,411 16,216 257,839 148 254,750 6,486

1,735 19,480 816,050 1,246, 256 Kentucky

2,114,187)

94,863 14,294

30,192 8,210 535,662 98,406 2,001,200 47,121 640 8,075 118,070 849, 343 5,415,268 Louisville '980,584 22,465 8,789 6,750

2,570

108,899 26,997 1,065,450 10,050 218 1,445 127,050 210,275 2,571,543 Tennessee

3.027,798 145,473 51,791 29,715 120,986 933,222 406,193 2,672,088 309,754 1,561 69,064 465,360 1,105,026 9,888,030 Nevada... 114,920 24,272

21,599 14,340 155,000 6,265

4,510

10,680 16.180 867,764 Nebraska Territory. 264,192 48,402 8,244 8,633

9,057 854,870 2,027 894,430 84,729

205 8,976

48,110 135,887 1,312,263 Colorado Territory. 293,173 97,018 19,670 2,672 15,780 223,874 15,560 464,923 64,790

8,117 5,830 250,453 1,461,860 Totals. $608,411,901) $18,861,138) $2,795,822 $2,852,345 $101,330,984 $92,492,446 $12,981,445 8443,193,438 819,205,584 $1,176,142 $16,634,972 $81,925,100 $104,586,827 $1,606.448,245

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