Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions and Death's Duel

Framsida
Cosimo, Inc., 1 juni 2007 - 244 sidor
WHAT will not kill a man if a vapour will? How great an elephant, how small a mouse destroys! To die by a bullet is the soldier's daily bread; but few men die by hail-shot. A man is more worth than to be sold for single money; a life to be valued above a trifle. If this were a violent shaking of the air by thunder or by cannon, in that case the air is condensed above the thickness of water, of water baked into ice, almost petrified, almost made stone, and no wonder that kills; but that which is but a vapour, and a vapour not forced but breathed, should kill, that our nurse should overlay us, and air that nourishes us should destroy us, but that it is a half atheism to murmur against Nature, who is God's immediate commissioner, who would not think himself miserable to be put into the hands of Nature.

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Sida xxix - Others to sin, and made my sin their door .Wilt thou forgive that sin which I did shun A year or two, but wallowed in a score ? When thou hast done, thou hast not done, For I have more. I have a sin of fear, that when I've spun My last thread, I shall perish on the shore : But swear by thyself, that at my death thy Son Shall shine as he shines now, and heretofore ; And having done that, thou hast done, I fear no more.
Sida 38 - The young lions do lack, and suffer hunger : But they that seek the Lord shall not want any good thing.
Sida 91 - Wherefore take unto you the whole armour of God, that you may be able to withstand in the evil day, and having done all to stand.
Sida xxviii - When thou hast done, thou has not done, For I have more. Wilt thou forgive that sin which I have won Others to sin, and made my sin their door? Wilt thou forgive that sin which I did shun A year or two, but wallowed in a score? *° When thou hast done, thou hast not done, For I have more.
Sida 109 - Another man may be sick too, and sick to death, and this affliction may lie in his bowels, as gold in a mine, and be of no use to him; but this bell, that tells me of his affliction, digs out and applies that gold to me: if by this consideration of another's danger I take mine own into contemplation, and so secure myself, by making my recourse to my God, who is our only security.
Sida 109 - No man is an island, entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main; if a clod be washed away by the sea, Europe is the less, as well as if a promontory were, as well as if a manor of thy...
Sida 20 - Lord, I have loved the habitation of thine house, and the place where thine honour dwelleth (Psalm xxvi.
Sida 29 - Virtue went out of him, and he healed allf* all the multitude (no person incurable), he healed them every whit1*3 (as himself speaks), he left no relics of the disease; and will this universal physician pass by this hospital, and not visit me? not heal me? not heal me wholly? Lord, I look not that thou shouldst say by thy messenger to me, as to Hezekiah, Behold, I will heal thee, and on the third day thou shalt go up to the house of the Lord...
Sida vi - His mother, and those to whose care he was committed, were watchful to improve his knowledge, and to that end appointed him tutors both in the mathematics, and in all the other liberal sciences, to attend him. But, with these arts, they were advised to instil into him particular principles of the Romish Church; of which those tutors professed, though secretly, themselves to be members.

Om författaren (2007)

Poet and churchman John Donne was born in London in 1572. He attended both the University of Oxford and the University of Cambridge, but did not receive a degree from either university. He studied law at Lincoln's Inn, London, in 1592, and was appointed private secretary to Sir Thomas Egerton, Keeper of the Great Seal, in 1598. He became an Anglican priest in 1615 and was appointed royal chaplain later that year. In 1621 he was named dean of St. Paul's Cathedral. Donne prepared for his own death by leaving his sickbed to deliver his own funeral sermon, "Death's Duel", and then returned home to have a portrait of himself made in his funeral shroud. He died in London on March 31, 1631.

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