Thoreau, the Poet-naturalist: With Memorial Verses

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C.E. Goodspeed, 1902 - 396 sidor
 

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Sida 180 - Come, Sleep, O Sleep, the certain knot of peace. The baiting-place of wit, the balm of woe, The poor man's wealth, the prisoner's release, The indifferent judge between the high and low!
Sida 180 - You meaner beauties of the night, That poorly satisfy our eyes More by your number than your light ; You common people of the skies ; What are you when the moon shall rise?
Sida 228 - tis the soul of peace : Of all the virtues, 'tis nearest kin to heaven ; It makes men look like gods. The best of men That e'er wore earth about him, was a sufferer; A soft, meek, patient, humble, tranquil spirit : The first true gentleman, that ever breathed.
Sida 71 - I hearing get, who had but ears, And sight, who had but eyes before; I moments live, who lived but years, And truth discern, who knew but learning's lore.
Sida 340 - He is retired as noontide dew, Or fountain in a noon-day grove ; And you must love him, ere to you He will seem worthy of your love.
Sida 84 - For life is a forgetting,' etc. Formerly, methought, nature developed as I developed, and grew up with me. My life was ecstasy. In youth, before I lost any of my senses, I can remember that I was all alive, and inhabited my body with inexpressible satisfaction; both its weariness and its refreshment were sweet to me.
Sida 304 - Greatness and goodness are not means, but ends ! Hath he not always treasures, always friends, The good great man ? Three treasures, love, and light, And calm thoughts regular as infant's breath : And three firm friends, more sure than day and night, Himself, his Maker, and the angel Death.
Sida 138 - BOTH. We saw Thee in Thy balmy nest, Bright dawn of our eternal Day ! We saw Thine eyes break from their East, And chase the trembling shades away. We saw Thee : and we blest the sight, We saw Thee by Thine Own sweet light.
Sida 263 - Who God doth late and early pray More of his grace than gifts to lend; And entertains the harmless day With a religious book or friend — This man is freed from servile bands Of hope to rise or fear to fall: Lord of himself, though not of lands, And, having nothing, yet hath all.
Sida 55 - Next Marlowe, bathed in the Thespian springs, Had in him those brave translunary things That the first poets had ; his raptures were All air and fire, which made his verses clear ; For that fine madness still he did retain Which rightly should possess a poet's brain.

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