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crificed by Julian on one and the same day. Encouraged by the example, the exhortations, the liberality of their pious sovereign, the cities and families resumed the practice of their neglected ceremonies.Every part of the world exclaims Libanius, displayed the triumph of religion; and the grateful prospect of flaming altars, bleeding victims, the smoke of incense, and a solemn train of priests and prophets, without fear or danger. The sound of prayer and of music was heard on the tops of the highest mountains; and the same ox afforded a sacrifice for the gods, and a supper for their joyous votaries.

A CALM ON THE LAKE OF GENEVA.

BYRON,

Clear, placid Leman ! thy contrasted lake,
With the wide world I dwelt in, is a thing
Which warns me, with its stillness, to forsake
Earth’s troubled waters for a purer spring.
This quiet sail is as a noiseless wing
To waft me from distraction; once I loved
Torn ocean's roar, but thy soft murmuring
Sounds sweet as if a sister's voice reproved
That I with stern delights should e'er have been so

moved.
It is the hush of night, and all between
Thy margin and the mountains, dusk, yet clear,

Mellowed and mingling, yet distinctly seen,
Save darkened Jura, whose capt heights appear
Precipitously steep; and drawing near,
There breathes a living fragrance from the shore,
Of flowers yet fresh with childhood; on the ear
Drops the light drip of the suspended oar,
Or chirps the grasshopper one good night carol more ;
At intervals, some bird from out the brakes
Starts into voice a moment, then is still.
There seems a floating whisper on the hill ;
But that is fancy--for the starlight dews
All silently their tears of love instil,
Weeping themselves away, till they infuse
Deep into nature's breast the spirit of her hues.

" THE STOMACH AND THE MEMBERS."

FROM LA FONTAINE.

Once on a time the human limbs
Were seized with odd conceits and whims,
The stomach all the rest accuse
of entertaining selfish views.
They cry;-that sluggard lives at ease,
By us supplied with luxuries.
In secret indolence he lurks ;
Enjoys our pains and never works.
Shall we thus early toil and late,
To swell that pampered gluttons state
--Shall we comply with such demands,

"Forbid it, justice !” cry the hands.
- No-tho’ for bread the tyrant begs-
We swear the same!” exclaim the legs.
Unmoved let that base lubber tarry-
We're slaves no more we scorn to carry
The very feet, -till now so humble
Loud as the rest began to grumble.
With one and all the general cry
Was, Freedom! and equality!
The stomach proud was now subdued--
Debarr'd from necessary food:
For no kind hand prepared his dishes ;
Refused were all his wants and wishes.
But soon perceived each wasted limb
The needful aid derived from him,
Whose power invisible had granted
To every member what it wanted :
And now cut off from his supply
The thoughtless rebels faint and die.
Menenius finished this oration,
The people felt the application.

COWPER'S DESCRIPTION OF LONDON

Ambition, avarice, penury incurred
By endless riot, vanity, the lust
Of pleasure and variety, dispatch
As duly as the swallows disappear
The world of wandering knights and squires to town.

London ingulphs them all! The shark is there,
And the shark's prey; the spendthrift and the leech,
That sucks him. There the sycophant, and he
Who, with bare headed and obsequious bows,
Begs a warm office, doomed to a cold jail
And groat per diem, if his patron frown.
The Levee swarms, as if in golden pomp
Where charactered on every statesman's door,
“Battered and Bankrupt Fortunes Mended Here.”
These are the charms, that sully and eclipse
The charms of Nature. 'Tis the cruel gripe
That lean hard handed poverty inflicts,
The hope of better things, the chance to win
The wish to shine, the thirst to be amused,
That at the sound of winter's hoary wing
Unpeopled all our counties of such herds
Of futtering, loitering, cringing, begging, loose
And wanton vagrants, as make London, vast
And boundless as it is, a crowded coop.
Oh thou, resort and mart of all the earth,
Chequered with all complexions of mankind,
And spotted with all crimes; in whom I see
Much that I love, and more that I admire,
And aīl that I abhor; thou freckled fair
That pleasest and yet shock'st me, I can laugh
And I can weep, can hope and can despond,
Feel wrath and pity, when I think on thee
Ten righteous would have saved a city once,

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And thou hast many righteous-Well for thee-
That salt preserves thee; more corrupted else,
And therefore more obnoxious, at this hour
Than Sodom in her day had power to be,
For whom God heard his Abraham plead in vain.

6 MR. GRATTAN'S REPLY TO THE CHARGE OF

• MENDICANT PATRIOT', MADE AGAINST HIM BY MR. FLOOD."

I will suppose a man to have added much private improbity to public crime; that his probity was like his patriotism, and his honor on a level with his oath. He loves to deliver panegyrics on himself. I will interrupt him, and say, Sir, you are much mistaken if you think that

your

talents have been as great as your life has been reprehensible; you began your parliamentary career with an acrimony and personality which could have been justified only by a supposition of virtue. After a rank and clamorous' opposition, you became on a sudden silent; you were silent for seven years; you were silent on the greatest questions, and you were silent for money! In 1773 you absconded from your duty in Parliament, you forsook the question of economy, and abandoned all the themes of your former declamation. You were not at that period to be found in the house : you were seen, like a guilty spirit, haunting the lobby of the House of Commons, watching the moment in which the ques

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