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the parliament of Ireland speak on the subject of their liberty. It begins to be made a question in England, whether the principal persons wish to be free.

It was the delicacy of former parliaments to be silent on the subject of commercial restrictions, lest they should shew a knowledge of the fact and not a sense of the violation. You have spoken out, you have shown a knowledge of the fact and not a sense of the violation. On the contrary, you have returned thanks for a partial repeal made on a principle of power ; you have returned thanks as for a favor; and your exultation has brought your charters as well as your spirit into question, and tends to shake to her foundation your title to liberty.

title to liberty. You have gone top far not to go on; you have brought yourselves into that situation in which you must silently abdicate the rights of your country, or publicly restore them.

EXAMINATION OF THE CAUSES OF THE

NEAPOLITAN WAR.

ABBE DE PRADT.

This examination approaches its conclusion; I shall finish it, as it was begun, in the sole hope of rendering it profitable, and, with this view, I will venture to address myself to those statesmen, whose actions I have endeavoured to analyze. You, who preside over

associations of mankind, should extend your views, and proportion them to the grandeur of the origin and of the destinies of these associations : hitherto you have too much contracted the circle of your ideas ; do not judge of these associations according to accidental circumstances, but with an attentive eye to their real nature; not according to the interests of the few, but to those of the whole; not, for the sake of some trifling satisfaction, but for the lasting benedictions and applauses that will resound at the mention of your Names in future ages. Lay aside your accusations against an impulse, which draws you, as well as the rest of the world, along with it, which is not that of a few, whom you may injure, but of the universe which nothing can counteract. It is that which surrounds you on every side, which enters into all your longings for power, for enjoyments, for honors. If you pretend to circumscribe it, to arrest its progress, come and I will lead you towards it; banish it from your territory, shut your ports against it, cut of asl communication with the universe, and, still more, raise up a party wall in the deep ocean between yourselves and America, stop all your travellers, repel all those of foreign countries, discourage the arts, cause printing to be forgotten; like new Omars, burn all the libraries, and yet, if you cannot deprive man of the faculty of memory, you will have effected nothing; in this desert of annihilation you may perhaps be permitted to

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escape, but without this absolute sequestration, you will weary yourselves in an unequal contest, and for what? To defer for a day the reception of its yoke. I know this new destiny afflicts and distresses you ; it is difficult to pass from the undivided possession of power, to the partition of it; but the state of the world is in question, as also to know whether it will submit to any thing else. You may in vain declare that you have three times arrested and combated the revolution ; it is not to be ranked among those things that are to be arrested; for, ever since you have spoken, it has been making rapid strides. Above alī, be mindful not to tell mankind that you are responsible to God only; it would be showing them all human societies deprived of a single guarantee. Responsibility is the guarantee which past ages have sought in vain; Egypt placed it in the pages of history, which were daily read to her kings; Crete, in the assembly of her sages. Kings have sometimes sacrificed to its shadow by the severe punishments they have inflicted on their ministers; lastly, the grand problem, the solution of which has escaped all former ages, is now resolved, and the honor of the solution belongs to our days.

MORNING HYMN.

"MILTON.”

These are thy glorious works, Parent of good!
Almighty! thine this universal frame,
Thus wond'rous fair ; thyself how wond'rous then!
Unspeakable! who sitt’st above these heavens
To us invisible or dimly seen
In these thy lower works; yet these declare
Thy goodness beyond thought and power divine.
Speak, ye who best can tell, ye sons of light,
Angels; for ye behold him, and with songs
And choral symphonies day without night,
Circle his throne, rejoicing; ye in heaven;
On earth join all ye creatures, to extol
Him first, him last, him midst and without end!
Fairest of stars, last in the train of night,
If better thou belong not to the dawn,
Şure pledge of day, that crown'st the smiling morn
With thy bright circlet, praise him in thy sphere
While day arises, that sweet hour of prime.
Thou sun of this great world both eye and soul
Acknowledge him thy greater; sound his praise
In thy eternal course, both when thou climb'st
And when high noon hast gained, and when thieu

fall'st.

Moon, that now meet'st the orient sun, now fly'st,
With the fixed stars, fixed in their orb that flies ;
And ye five other wand'ring fires that move
In mystic dance not without song resound
His praise, who out of darkness call'd up light.
Air, and ye elements, the eldest birth
Of nature's womb, that in quaternian run
Perpetual circle, multiform, and mix
And nourish all things; let your ceaseless change
Vary to our great Maker still new praise.
Ye mists and exhalations that now rise
From hill or steaming lake dusky or gray,
Till the sun paint your fleecy skirts with gold
In honor to the world's great Author rise ;
Whether to deck with clouds the uncolor'd sky,
Or wet the thirsty earth with falling showers
Rising or falling still advance his praise.
His praise, ye winds, that from four quarters blou,
Breathe soft or loud and wave your tops, ye pines
With every plant, in sign of worship wave.
Fountains, and ye that warble as ye flow,
Melodious murmurs, warbling tune his praise.
Join voices all ye living souls; ye birds,
That singing, up to heaven gate ascend
Bear on your wings, and in your notes, his praise.
Ye that in waters glide, and ye that walk
The earth and stately tread or lowly creep
Witness if I be silent, morn or even,

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