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17 six | hundred | 7 and | eighty / live, 717 the Earl of Ar | gyle 7 | 7 was brought from the casile, | | first, 7 | 7 to the Laigh 7 | council-house, 1 7 and thence, 717 to the place of execution. 11 | 7 Be | fore he | left the castle, | 7 he had his | dinner | 7 at the usual | hour, 7 | 7 at which he discoursed, 7 | not only | calmly, | 7 but even | cheerfully, | 7 with Mr. | Chateris | 7 and others. 11 Aiter dinner | 7 he re | tired, 7 | 7 as was kis | custom, 1 7 to his bed-chamber, ! | where it is recorded, 17 that he | slept 7 | quietly 1 7 for a

| bout a quarter of an hour. 7| | | While he was in bed, 7 | one of the members of the council | came, 7 | 7 and intimated | 7 to the 'at | tendants, | 7 a de | sire 7 | 7 to speak with him. I 17 Upon | being / told 7 1 7 that the | Earl 7 | 7 was a | sleep, 7 | 7 and had | left 7 | orders | not to be dis | turbed, 7 | 7 the manager | disbe | lieved the ac | count, 7! / which he considered | 7 as a de 1 vice 7 | 7 to a / void 7 | further questionings. ! !

17 To 1 satisfy him, | 7 the door of the bedchamber, 1 7 was half 7 | opened, | 7 and then 7 | 7 he be | held, 17 en 1 joying a | sweet 7 | 7 and | tranquil | slumber, 1 7 the man, 7 | who 7 1 7 by the doom of | him 7 1 7 and his I fellows, 1 7 was to

| die 7 1 7 with | in the short 7 | space 7 17 of | two.7 | hours! 9 1 1

Struck with the sight, 7 1 7 he | hurried | 7 out of the 1 room, 1 1 quitted the castle | 7 with the utmost pre / cipi | tation, | 7 and hid himself | 7 in the I lodgings of an acquaintance | 7 who I lived 7

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| near, 71 17 where he | threw himself | 7 upon the first 7 | bed that pre-1 sented itself, | 7 and had | every ap | pearance of a | mau 7 | suffering | 7 the | most ex | cruciating | torture. I 1.17 His | friend, 7 7 who was ap | prised of the state he was | in, 7 17 and who | naturally concluded he was ill, 7 I offers him some | wine. 71 1 1 7 He re ! sused, 7 | saying, / "no, 7 | no, 7 | that 7 | will not

| help me. I 17 I have been at Ar | gyle, 717 and I saw him | sleeping 1 7 as | pleasantly as ever

man 7 | did 7 | 7 with | in 7 | one ? | hour 7 | 7 of E / ternity, 1 1 7 but | as for me” g 1

1 7 The / name of the person | 7 to whom 7 | this 7 | anecdote re | lates 7 1 7 is not 7 | mentioned, 1 17 and the truth of it | 7 may | therefore 17 be 1 fairly considered | 7 as | liable | 7 to that de gree of doubt, 7 1 7 with | which 7 | men of judgment | 7 receive 7 | every species / 7 of tra | ditional history. | | | Woodrow, | 7 how ever, ) 7 whose vel racity 1 7 is a | bove sus | picion, / l says, 7 | 7 he had it | 7 from the most un | questionable | 7 au 1 thority. I | 17 It is not in it! self 7 | un likely; 1 1 7 and / who is there, | 7 that | would not wish it true? 7| | | What a satis | factory | spectacle | 7 to a | philo | sophical | mind, 7 | 7 to see the op | pressor 1 7 in the | zenith of his power | | envying his | victim! || | What an ac | knowledgment | 7 of the superiority of virtue!! | | What an

an af | fecting | 7 and forcible testimony | 7 of the value of that peace of

mind, 1 ng which | Innocence | Ya | lone 7 1 7 can con | fer! 7| 17 We know not | who 7 1 7 this

| man 7 | was, 7 | | but when we re | flect 7 | 7 that the guilt 7 | 7 which I agonized him, | 7 was | probably 1 7 in | curred | 7 for some | vain 7 | title, | 7 or at least 7 1 7 for some | increase of wealth 717 which he did not want, 7 | 7 and possibly | knew not | how to enjoy; 7 1 7 our dis / gust 7 1 7 is ! turned into | something | like com | passion, 1 7 for that | very | foolish | class of men, 9 | whom the world 7 | calls 7 | wise in their / gene | ration. | | |

Soon 7 | after this short re | pose, 7 | 7 Ar | gyle | 7 was brought 7 | 7 according to order, 1 7 to the | Laigh 7 | council-house, 1 7 from / which 71 place 7 | 7 is ! dated | 7 the letter to his wife, 7 | 17 and from thence 7 | 7 to the place of exe | cution. I 1 17 On the / scaffold | 7 he had some dis

| course, 7 | 7 as well with Mr. | Annand, | 7 a minister | 7 ap | pointed by | Government | 7 to at tend him, | as with Mr. Chateris. | | | He de sired | both of them | 7 to pray for him, 7 and | prayed him | self 7 | 7 with | much 7 | fervour | 7 and de | votion. | | 17 The speech which he made to the people 1 7 was such as I might be expected

1 7 from the passages al | ready re | lated. | | | 7 The same 7 | mixture of | firmness | 7 and mildness | 7 is con / spicuous in every part of it. ||

1 7 "We ought not,” | 7 said 7 | he 7 1 7 " to des / pise 7 | 7 our af flictions, | nor to , faint 7 | under them. I 1 1 7 We / should not / suffer ourselves !

F

7 to be ex | asperated | 7 al gainst the | instruments

17 of our | troubles, | nor by | fraudulent | 7 or | pusil | lanimous com | pliance, | | bring 7 | guilt 7

| upon our / selves; 7 || faint 7 | hearts 7 | 7 are | usually | false 7 | hearts, 7| | choosing | sin, 7 | rather than | suffering."| 17 He offers his prayers | 7 for the three 7 | kingdoms | 7 of England, / Scotland | 7 and Ireland, / I and that an

| end 7 | 7 may be / put 7 1 7 to their | present 9 | trials. | | | Having | then 7 | asked 7 | pardon | 7 for his own 7 | faults, 7 | both of | God and | man, 7

| 7 he / would have concluded, | 7 but | being re | minded | 7 that he had | said 7 | nothing / of the royal | family, | 7 he | adds, 7 | 7 that he re | fers, 7 17 in | this 7 | matter | 7 to | what he had | said at his / trial | 7 con cerning the | test; 7| | 7 that he

I prayed 7 17 there | never might be / wanting | one 7 | of the royal | family 1 7 to sup | port the | Protestant re | ligion; / 1 7 and if | any of them 7 had | swerved from the true ? | faith, 7 | 7 he prayed 7 God 7 | 7 to turn their | hearts; 7 | 7 but at any rate | 7 to save his people | 7 from their | machi | nations. | | | When he had | ended, | 7 he turned to the south 7 | side of the 1 scaffold 1 7 and I said, 711 “Gentlemen, | 7 I pray you, | do not miscon struct | 7 my be haviour | this 7 | day. 7 | 171 | freely for give 7 | all men | their 7 | wrongs and | injuries | done a I gainst | me, 71 7 as I de | sire 7 1 7 to be for I given of God." 7

1 17 He then em | braced his friends, 71 gave some , tokens | 7 of his re membrance | 7 to

his son-in-law, | Lord 7 | Maitland, 1 7 for his daughter and grand-children, stript himself 7 of part of his ap | parel, 1 7 of which he | likewise | made 7 | presents, | 7 and laid his head 7 | upon the block. 71 l | Having | uttered a short 7 | prayer, | 7 he gave the signal | 7 to the | exe cutioner, / which was I instantly obeyed, 7 1 7 and his head 7 | severed from his body. || |

Such were the last 7 hours 7 | 7 and such the | final | close 717 of this great 7 | man's 7 | life. " I 1 | May the | like 7 | happy se | renity, | 7 in such | dreadful | circumstances, | 7 and a | death 7 | equally | glorious, | 7 be the lot of all, 7 | 7 whom

| tyranny 1 7 of what | ever des | cription | 7 or de nomi | nation, 1 7 shall in | any | age, 7 | 7 or in any | country, I call to | expiate their | virtues | 7 on the scaffold! | |

II

A MOONLIGHT SCENE.

POPE'S HOMER.-ILIAD VIII. V. 673.

7 THE | leader | spoke. 7| 1 7 From | all his host

a | round 71 Shouts of ap | plause 7 | 7 a long the shores re /

sound. 7| | | Each from the | yoke 7 1 7 the / smoking | steeds un

| ty’d, 71 7 And | fix'd their headstalls 1 7 to his / chariot |

side. 7 1 1 1

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