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7 Well | pleas'd I follow | 7 thro' the / sacred |

paths 71 7 Of | Nature | 7 and of Science; | | Nurse 717

di | vine 7 | 7 Of | generous | counsels | 7 and he | roic | deeds!

71 0 7 let the breath of thy ex | tended | praise 7 | 7 In / spire my | kindling | bosom | 7 to the height

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7 Of | this 7 | un | tempted | theme! 71 | Nor be

my | thoughts 71 7 Pre | sumptuous counted, | | if 717 a mid the

| calın 7 | 7 Which | Hesper / sheds a long the / vernal | heav

en 1 7 1 | steal im I patient | 7 from the sordid | haunts

en 7 Of strife and I low am | bition, | 7 and the |

gloom | 9 Of | vulgar | super | stition, | 7 to attend, 7 | 7 With | hymns, 7 | thy 7 | presence, / 7 in the 1 syl

van | shade 7 | 7 By | their ma | lignant | footsteps | | ne'er 7 17

pro | faned. 7 1 1 7 De | scend, 7| 7 pro 1 pitious 1 7 to my favorid |

eye, 711 Such in thy | mien 7 1 7 thy I warm ex | alted | air,

71 | As when the Persian | tyrant, 7 | | foild 7 | 7 and I strong 71

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7 With | shame? | 7 and | despe | ration, | gnash'd

his teeth, 71 7 To I see thee | rend the pageants of his | throne;

711 And at the | lightning of thy I lifted | spear, 7 | Crouch'd 7 | like a | slave. 7 |

Bring 7 | all thy | martial / spoils, 7 | 7 Thy / palms, 717 thy | laurels, 1 7 thy tri | um

phal | songs; 7 1 1 7 Thy | smiling | band of arts; 9 1 1 7 thy I god

likesires 71 7 of civil | wisdom; || 7 thy he | roic | youth, 7

Il Warm from the schools of glory! | | Guide my |

way 71 7 Thro' | fair | 7 Ly | ceum's I walk 7 1 7 the olive

7 | shades 71 7 Of Academus, | 7 and the sacred | vale 7 | Haunted by | steps di | vine! 7|| where 7 | once 7

| 7 beneath 7 | That 7 | ever | living | plantain's | ample I boughs,

7.1 7 11 | issus, | 7 by So | cratic | sounds de | tain'd7 |

| On his neg | lected | urn, 717 attentive,

lay; 7 1 1 my While | Boreas, 7| | lingering | 7 on the neigh

bouring | steep, 7 | 7 With | beautious | Ori | thyea | 7 his | love tale, I 7 In | silent | awe, 7 | 7 sus / pended: 1 | there let

| me, 71

7 With | blameless | hand, 7 | from thy un | envious

| fields 71 7 Transplant some | living | blossoms 1 7 to al

dorn 71 7 My | native | clime; 7| | 7 while | far above the

1 flight 71 7 Of | Fancy's | plume ? | 7 as | piring, 1 17 I un

lock

7 The springs 7| 7 of ancient | wisdom; l 17

while I join Thy 7 | name, 7 | thrice | honor'd! | | with the im

| mortal | praise 7 | 7 Of Nature, | | while to my com | patriot | youth

71 7 1 | point the high ex | ample | 7 of thy | Sons, 7 7 And | tune 7 | 7 to | Attic | themes 9 | 7 the | Brit

ish | lyre. 71 11

ON SINCERITY.

FROM A. B. P. TILLOTSON, (ABRIDGED.) Truth 77 | 7 and sin | cerity | 7 have all the ad vantages | 7 of ap | pearance, | 7 and many more. 7 1 1 1 7 If the show of any thing I 7 be l good for | any thing, | 17 I am sure | 7 the re , ality | 7 is | better: 117 for | why 917 does any man 7 dis | semble, | 7 or seem to be that which he | is 7 | not, 7 || but be cause 7 | 7 he thinks it | good to I have 7 1 7 the qualities 17 he pre / tends

to? | | | Now the best 7 | way 7 1 7 for a man to

seem to be any thing, | is to be in re | ality, | what he would seem to be: 117 be | sides, 717 it is often as | troublesome | 7 to support the pre

| tence of a good 7 | quality, 1 7 as to have it; } 7 and 1 if a | 7 man have it not, 1 7 it is most 7 | likely | he will be dis | covered to want it; | | 7 and | then, | all his | labour to | seem to have it, I 7 is | lost. 7 || 17 There is something | un | natural 17 in | painting, | 7 which a | skilful | eye 7 | 7 will | easily dis | cern 7 | 7 from | native | beauty | 7 and com | plexion. Il

Therefore, | 7 if any man | think it con / venient to | seem 7 | good, 7 | let him | be so in | deed: 71 17 and then 7 17 his goodness will ap | pear 7 | 7 to | every one's | 7 satis | faction. I 117 Par | ticularly, | | as to the affairs of this 7 | world, 7 1 7 in | tegrity | 7 hath | many ad | vantages over | all the arti | ficial | modes 7 | 7 of dissimu | lation 17 and de | ceit. 7 || | 7 It is much the plainer 1 7 and / easier, | | much the / safer, 1 7 and more se | cure 7 | way of dealing in the / world; 7|17 it has | less of trouble and difficulty, | 7 of en tanglement | 7 and per | plexity, 17 of danger and

| hazard 7 in it. 71 | 17 The | arts of deceit and | cunning | 7 con | tinually I grow | weaker, / 7 and less serviceable | 7 to 1 those that I practise them; | | 7 where I as | 7 in | tegritygains strength by | use; 7 | 17 and the more and I lon

ger | any man | practiseth it, | 7 the greater | service 4 it does him;]17 by con / firming his repu / tation, / and en | couraging / those 7 with | whom he hath to do, 717 to re 1 pose the

1 greatest confidence | 7 in him: I which is an un speakable ad | vantage | 7 in business, 1 7 and the af | fairs of life. 7 || |

7 'But insin | cerity | 7 is | very | troublesome to | manage. ||17 A | hypocrite | 7 hath | so many | 7 things | 7 to attend to, | 7 as I make his | 7 lite" | 7 a very per | plexed and | intricate | thing. 7

1117 A | liar | 7 hath | need of a good ? | memory, | | lest he | contra | dict 7 | 7 at one 7 | time 7 | 7 what he said at an other: 711 7 but | truth 717 is always con | sistent, | 7 and 17 needs | nothing to help it out:7|| 7 it is always | near at | hand, 7 1 7 and | sits upon our I lips, 71 1 7 where | as a | lie 7 | 7 is | troublesome, | 7 and needs a great 7 | many more 7 | 7 to make it | good. 7111

7 In a | word, 7 | whatso | ever convenience | 7 may be thought 717 to be in | falsehood 17 and dis | simu | lation, | 7 it is soon 7 | over: 11 but the incon | venience of it | 7 is per | petual; | | 7 be cause 7 | 7 it | brings a | 7 man under an | ever / lasting 1 jealousy / and sus | picion ; ! | so that he is not be | lieved 7 | 7 when he / speaks the | truth; 711 7 nor | trusted | 7 when per | haps, 7 17 hel means 7 | honestly, 1 | | When a | man

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