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He who declares his perception of blemishes, and cannot at the same time define and enumerate graces, speaks without candor or as the dupe of authority.---- Rush on the Philosophy of the Human Voice."

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KUVLIV VIEGT

PUBLICIIBRARY

1
ASTOR, LEXOX AND
TILLE FOUNDATIONS.

Repair e, L

ILS

Northern District of New York, to wit :

BE IT REMEMBERED, That on the twelfth day of September, in the fifty third year of the Independence of the - United States of America. A. D. 1828, George J. Loomis, of

ited in this office the title of a

vaims as proprietor in the words following, to wit : “Exercises in Reading and Recitation, founded on an enquiry in the elementary constitution of the Human Voice.' By Dr. John BARBER, Professor of Elocution. He who declares his perception of blemishes, and cannot at the same time define and enumerate graces, speaks without candor, or as the dupe of authority.---'Rush on the Philosophy of the Human

In conformity to the act of the Congress of the United States, entitled " An act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of Maps, Charts, and Books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the times therein mentioned ;” and also, to the act entitled "An act supplementary to an act entitled An act for the encouragement of learning by securing the copies of Maps, Charts, and Books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies during the times therein mentioned,' and extending the benefits

thereof to the arts of designing, engraving, and etching historical and other prints.”

R. R. LANSING, Clerk of the District of the United States, for the Northern District of Neur-York.

Voice. »

Page.

Page
Apostrophe to the Queen of France 29 Hohenlinden

37
Addison's Hymn
71 Hymn to the Deity

58
Alexander's Feast
84 Happiness of Temper

131
Apostrophe to Light

119
Hyder Ali

145
Antony's Oration over Cæsar's body 137 Hazlitt on the paintings of Raphael 191
Atheism by Establishment
172 Holy Alliance

193
Atheism and Christianity

174 Invocation to Grecian Energy 65
A Calm on the ake of Geneva 181 Isaiah, Chap. 35

121
Ames, on the British Treaty 264 Introduction to Lecture 8, on Scrip-
American War
270 ture Facts

276
An Hour of Romance
290 Lucy

41
Anatomy of Drunkenness
292 Leonidas, book 9

237
Battle of Warsaw
45 Morning

43
Burke, on the Trial of Warren Moonlight Scene

55
Hastings
169 Mary

148
Beauty and Happiness of an Open Mr. Grattan's Reply

185
Behaviour
230 Morning Hymn

199
Byron
284 Old Cheese

142
Buonaparte and Washington 295 Oration on the Declaration of Right 211
Candour
31 Oneida Chief's Song

234
Chevalier's Lament

34 Part of the Burial Service
Childe Harold

103
Paper

80
Cassius instigating Brutus to join the Passions

98
conspiracy against Cæsar 129 Plunket, on the Union

163
Curran, in defence of Owen Kirwan 159 Passage of the Israelites through the
Character of Mr. Pitt
170 Red Sea

176
Character of the Emperor Julian 179 Psalm 102

219
Cowper's Description of London 183 Part ntal Affection

236
Campbell on the Poetry of Milton 221 Price of an Equipage

299
Combat
241 Reply of Mr Pitt

95
Country Schoolmaster
244 Roman Empire

190
Curran, on the Trial of Finnerty 249 Rights of Things

279
Corinthians, chap. 5
274 Remorse and Punishment

294
Dirge in Cymbeline

36 Satan calling the fallen Angels from
Declaration of Independence 150

the Oblivious Pool

77
Darkness
156 St Paul's Defence

108
Declaration of Rights
194 Song of Moses

112
Dialogue concerning Oratory 203 Speech of Achithophel

114
Description of Napoleon
205 Speech of Patrick Henry

122
Discovery of Satan in the Garden Satan's Soliloquy

126
of Eden
208 Speech of Galba

161
Description of Old Age
242 Speech of Lycurgus.

166
Discourse on Astronomy

246 Satan, Death, and Sin, at the Infer-
Exile of Erin
17 nal Gates

214
Execution of the Earl of Argyle 50 Solitude

216
Examination of the causes of the Self Devotion to Solitary Studies ac-
Neapolitan War
196 counted for

227
Enthusiasm

201 Sheridan's Speech on the Trial of
Erskine, on the Trial of the Pub-

Warren Hastings

255
lisher of Paine's Age of Reason 218 Sincerity

68
Erskine, on the trial of Stockdale 223 The Stomach and the Members 182
Expostulation
245 The Last Day

252
Exodus, chap. 20
253 The Bard

259
Evening Prayer at a Girl's School 286 Three Warnings

266
From the Dance of the Consump-

Thunder Storm

39
tives Angelina
232 Thames

48
Frisbie on Moral Science
173 Universities

288
Fourth chapter of John
91 Vision of Liberty

239
Gray's Elegy
23 Without God in the World

135
Greece

141
War in Naples

206
Germanicus, to his Mutinous Troops 187 Young's Night Thoughts

147
Herinit

20

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INTRODUCTION.

In the following pages, great care has been bestored on the Rythmus of our language, or in other words on that distribution of time, stress, and pause, which constitutes the ease, force, and variety of a pleasing and natural delivery.

That this is an object of great importance, no one who has paid attention to the heavy monotony, or the rapid enunciation of the Juvenile elocutionist, will deny:

Rythmus fulfils three important offices; that of marking the accented syllables, thus aiding the orthoepy of the language; dividing those syllables into regular successions; by such means preventing the unpleasant and heavy monotony which their immediate succession would produce on the ear; and lastly, so adjusting the pauses or rests of the voice, as to leave respiration free and unhurried through the most lengthened discourses and under all the conditions of force.

In the Rythmus of the ancient languages, a certain number of syllables occupied a corresponding portion of time, thus an lambic foot always consisted of one short and one long syllable, and a regular succession of these feet was denominated “Jambic measure.". The spirit and construction of our language will not admit this division. The accented syllables frequent

B

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