Sidor som bilder
PDF
ePub

of authorized opinion became as tow, in the hands of the sage. And it was not till these were broken, that genius ever mounted upward. The queries that mind then proposed to itself, were such as he is fabled to have asked, who, as the story would have it, awoke into being, in the maturity of manhood, on a solitary isle—“Whence came I ? What am I? Whither am I bound 2’’ Who can hear them propounded in the controversies of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, in reality, though not in form, without the intensest interest. They are the language of the first aspirations of mind. And how do our grief and admiration alternate, as we see “this spark of the divinity” thrust by its own fiat into the deepest shades “of nothingness,” and afterwards behold it tired of its abode, “through upper and through middle darkness borne,” basking in the light of Him, in whom all the magnificence of heaven and earth is lost. After it had assumed its true position on the scale of excellence, and its spirit of research was abroad in the earth, exploring nature and tasking her powers for the benefit of art, those of the finest mould in every nation came together, each with his hammer and chisel, and with their collected talent, formed a frame-work which Hiram’s wealth and Solomon's taste might emulate in vain—the temple of the mind. Within its sacred walls, the studious and the learned, the philosopher and the logician, the poet and the orator, have ever since offered up their vows and sacrifices. Let not then that study, which has awakened genius, be trodden under foot. He who would exterminate his species and glut himself with blood, might leap exulting upon the mangled corpses of his enemies; he might even insult the dead, and outrage, in his fury, all our feelings, and yet be innocent, compared with him who sneers at the untiring industry of the sage, that spends his days in unravelling the mysteries of the mind. His is a study, without which no other, whether in art or science, can come to maturity and be divested of the false glare of speculation and theory.

Y. T. S. LINES, * PFNCILED IN AN ALBUM of “selections.” An Album—what a pity 'tis That drew it from its native sand, That one so elegant as this— Than own the jewels of a king, Designed to be the jewel-case, When made the robber's offering.

Where each his own true gem may place,
Should be filled up with borrowed ware,
Though very rich, forsooth, and rare :

A native sun I'd rather glow,
Whence beams of mine can only flow,
Though dim as yonder little star

I'd rather have a diamond crude That twinkles in the heavens asar,
As human vision ever viewed, Than be the moon, with borrowed light,
May I but take it from the hand To gleam upon the frosts of night.

[ocr errors]

THE

YALE LITERARY MAGAZINE.

conducted

-

s Tu D E N T S or YAL E Co L. L. E. G. E.

Dum men's grata monet, nomen landesque Yalooses
Cantabunt Sonolos, unanimique Poros.”

WOL. IL-NO. IV.

FEBRUARY, 1837.

NEW HAVEN:
HERRICK & N. O. YES.

| MDCCCXxxvii.

[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]

of authorized opinion became as tow, in the hands of the sage. And it was not till these were broken, that genius ever mounted upward. The queries that mind then proposed to itself, were such as he is fabled to have asked, who, as the story would have it, awoke into being, in the maturity of manhood, on a solitary isle—“Whence came I ? What am I ? Whither am I bound 2’’ Who can hear them propounded in the controversies of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, in reality, though not in form, without the intensest interest. They are the language of the first aspirations of mind. And how do our grief and admiration alternate, as we see “this spark of the divinity” thrust by its own fiat into the deepest shades “of nothingness,” and afterwards behold it tired of its abode, “through upper and through middle darkness borne,” basking in the light of Him, in whom all the magnificence of heaven and earth is lost. After it had assumed its true position on the scale of excellence, and its spirit of research was abroad in the earth, exploring nature and tasking her powers for the benefit of art, those of the finest mould in every nation came together, each with his hammer and chisel, and with their collected talent, formed a frame-work which Hiram’s wealth and Solomon's taste might emulate in vain—the temple of the mind. Within its sacred walls, the studious and the learned, the philosopher and the logician, the poet and the orator, have ever since offered up their vows and sacrifices. Let not then that study, which has awakened genius, be trodden under foot. He who would exterminate his species and glut himself with blood, might leap exulting upon the mangled corpses of his enemies; he might even insult the dead, and outrage, in his fury, all our feelings, and yet be innocent, compared with him who sneers at the untiring industry of the sage, that spends his days in unravelling the mysteries of the mind. His is a study, without which no other, whether in art or science, can come to maturity and be divested of the false glare of speculation and theory.

Y. T. S. LINES, * PFNcil ED IN AN ALBUM of “selections.” An Album—what a pity 'tis That drew it from its native sand, That one so elegant as this— Than own the jewels of a king, Designed to be the jewel-case, When made the robber's offering.

Where each his own true gem may place, - •

should be filled up with borrowed ware, |A native sun I'd rather glow,

Though very rich, forsooth, and rare Whence beams of mine can only flow, Though dim as yonder little star

I'd rather have a diamond crude That twinkles in the heavens asar,
As human vision ever viewed, Than be the moon, with borrowed light,
May I but take it from the hand To gleam upon the frosts of night.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small]

NEW HAVEN . HERRICK & N. O. YES.

s T. L. D. E. N. T. S. O. F. W. A. L. E. C. O. L. L. E. G. E.

- -

* Dunn mens grata manet, nomen landesque Yalooses
Cantabunt Sopotas, unanimique Paros.”

WOL. IL-NO. IV.

F.E. B. R U.A.R.Y., 1837.

MDCCCXXXVII.

[graphic]
[graphic]
« FöregåendeFortsätt »