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with women, or have used wanton dalliance with kissing and embracing, then have you broken this commandment.

Neo. I beseech you, sir, proceed to speak of the eighth commandment as you have done of the rest.

COMMANDMENT VIII. Evan. Well, then, I pray you, consider, that in the eighth commandinent there is a negative part expressed in these words, “ Thou shalt not steal ;" that is, thou shalt by no unlawful way or means hurt or hinder the wealth and outward estate either of thyself or others; and an affirmative part included in these words, “ But thou shalt by all good means preserve and further them both.”

Neo. I pray you, sir, begin with the negative part, and first tell us what is forbidden in this commandment, as a hurt or hinderance of our own outward estate ?

Evan. That re may not hurt or binder our own outward estate, in this commandment is forbidden idleness, sloth, and inordinate walking, Prov. xviii. 9; 2 Thess. iii. 11; and so also is unthriftiness, and carelessness, either in spending our goods, or in ordering our affairs and businesses, Prov. xxi. 17; 1 Tim. v. 8; and so also is anadvised suretyship, Prov. xi. 15.

Neo. And what is forbidden in this commandment as tending to the hurt or hinderance of our neighbour's estate ?

Evan. That we may not hurt or hinder our neighbour's outward estate, in this commandment is forbidden covetousness and discontentedness with our estate, Heb, xiii. 5; and so also is enviousness at the prosperity of others; Prov. xxiv. 1; and so also is resolutions or hastening to be rich, as it were, whether the Lord afforded means or not, 1 Tim. vi. 9; Prov. xvii. 28; and so also is borrowing and not paying again, we being able, Psalm xxxvii. 21; and so also is lending upon usury, Exod. xxii. 25; and so also the not restoring of things borrowed, Psal. xxxvii. 21; and so also is cruelty in requiring all our debts, without compassion or mercy, Isa. lviii. 3; and so also is the praising of any commodity we sell, contrary to our own knowledge, or the debasing of any thing we buy, against our own conscience, Isa. v. 20; Prov. xx. 14 ; and so also is the hoarding up, or withholding the selling of corn and other necessary cominodities when we may spare them, and others have need of them, Prov. xi. 26; and so also is the retaining of hireling's wages, Jam. v. 4; and so also is uncharitable inclosure, Isa. v. 8; and so also is the selling of any commodity by false weights or false measures, Lev. xix. 35, and so also is the concealing of things found, and witholding them from the right owners when they are known; and so also is robbery, or the laying of violent and strong hands on any part of the wealth that belongs unto another, Zech. iv. 3, 4; and so also is pilfering and secret carrying away of the wealth that belongs to another, John vii. 21 ; and so also is the consenting to the taking away the goods of another, Psalm xc. 18; and so also is the receiving or harbouring of stolen goods, Prov. xxvii. 24.

Neo. Well, now, sir, I pray you proceed to the affirmative part of this commandment, and tell us what the Lord therein requires.

Evan. In this commandment is required contentedness of mind with that part and portion of wealth and outward good things which God in his providence has allotted unto us, Heb. xiii. 5; 1 Tim. vi. 6–8; and so also in resting by faith upon the promise of God, and depending upon his providence, without distrustful care, Matt. vi. 20, 26; and so also is a moderate desire of such things as are convenient and necessary for us, Matth. vi. 21; Prov. xxx. 8; and so also is a moderate care to provide those things which are needful for us, Gen. xxx. 30; 1 Tim. v. 8; and so also is an honest calling, Gen. iv. 2; and so also is diligence, painfulness, and faithful labouring therein, Gen. iii. 19; and so also is frugality or thriftiness, Prov. sxyii. 23, 24; John vi. 12: and so also is borrowing for need and good ends, what we are able to repay, and making payment with thanks and cheerfulnesss, Exod. xxii. 14; and so also is lending freely without compounding for gain, Deut. xv. 8; Luke vi. 35; and so giving, or communicating outward things unto others, according to our ability and their necessity, Luke ix. 41; so also is the using of trath, simplicity, and plainness in buying and selling, in hiring and letting, Lev. xxv. 14; Deut. xxv. 13–15; and so also is the rostoring of things found, Deut. xxii. 2, 3; and so also is the restoring of things committed to our trust, Ezek. xviii. 7. And thus have I endeavoured to satisfy your desire concerning the eighth command. ment; and now, neighbour Nomologista, I pray you, tell me whether you think you keep it perfectly or not?

Nom. I can say this truly, that I never in all my life took away, or consented to the taking away, of so much as a penny-worth of any other man's goods.

Evan. Though you did not, yet if ever there have been in your heart any discontentedness with your own estate, or any envious thoughts towards others in regard of their prosperity in the world, or any resolution to be rich, otherwise than by the moderate use of lawful means, or if ever you borrowed and paid not again, to the utmost of your ability, or if ever you lent upon usury, or if ever you did cruelly require any debt above the ability of your debtor, or if ever you praised any thing you had to sell above the known worth of it, or if ever you did undervalue any thing you were to buy contrary to your own thoughts of it, or if ever you hoarded up corn in the time of dearth, or if ever you retained the bireling's wages in your bands, to his loss or hinderance, or if ever you did conceal any thing found from the right owner, when you knew him; then have you been guilty of theft, and so have been a transgressor of this commandment.

And though you never have done any of these things, (and it is strange if you have not), yet if ever you were guilty of idleness, sloth, or any way unwarrantably neglected your calling, or if ever you did unthriftily misspend any of your own goods, or ever were negligent and careless in ordering your own affairs and business, or if ever you sustained any loss by your unadvised suretyship, or if ever you borrowed upon usury, except in case of extreme necessity, then have you been guilty of robbing yourself, and so have been a transgressor of this commandment.

Neo. Now, I pray you, sir, proceed to speak of the ninth commandment, as you have done of the rest.

COMMANDJENT IX.

Evan. Well then, I pray you consider, that in the ninth commandment there is a negative part expressed in these words; “ Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbour;" that is, thou shalt not think or speak any thing contrary to truth, or that may tend to the hurt or hinderance either of thine own or thy neigbour's good name. And an affirmative part included in these words, “ But thou shalt by all good means seek to maintain them both, according to truth and a good conscience.”

Neo. Well, sir, I pray you begin with the negative part; and first tell us what is forbidden in this commandment, in respect of our own good name.

Evan. That we may not be guilty of bearing false witness against ourselves, either by overvaluing or undervaluing ourselves, in this commandment is forbidden too high a conceit or esteem of ourselves, Luke xviii. 9—11; and so also is too mean a conceit, in underweening the good things that be in ourselves, Exod. iv. 10, 13; and so also is the procuring of ourselves, an evil name, by walking indiscreetly and offensively, Com. ii. 24; and so also is the unjust accusing of ourselves, when we, in a way of proud humility, say, “ We have no grace, no wit, no wealth,” &c. Prov. xiii. 7; and so also is the excusing of our faults, by way of lying, Lev. xix. 11.

Neo. And what is forbidden in this commandment, in respect of our neighbour's good naine?

Evan. That we may not be guilty of not bearing false witness against any other man, in this commandment is forbidden contemning or thinking basely of others, 2 Sam. vi. 16; and so also is wrongful suspicion, or evil surmisings, 2 Sam. x. 3 ; and so also is rash, uncharitable, unjust judging and condemning of others, Matt. vii. 1; and so also is foolish admiring of others, Acts vii. 22; and so also is the unjust reviving the memory of our neighbour's crimes, which were in tract of time forgotten, Prov. xvii. 9; and so also is the forbearing to speak in the cause and for the credit of our neighbours, Prov. viii. 9; and also is all flattering speeches, Job xxxii. 21, 22; and so also is tale-bearing, backbiting, and slanderous speeches, Lev. xix. 16; Prov. xx. 19; and so also is listening to tale-bearers, Prov. xxvi. 20, and xxv. 23; and so also is falsely charging some ill upon another before some magistrate, or in some open court, Amos vii. 10; Acts xxv. 2.

Neo. I pray you, sir, proceed to the affirmative part of this commandment, and first tell us what the Lord requires of us for the maintenance of our own good name.

Evan. For the maintenance of our own good name, the Lord in this commandment requires a right judgment of ourselves, 2 Cor. xiii. 5; with a love to, and a care of our own good name, Prov. xxii. 1.

Neo. And what does the Lord in this commandment require of us for the maintenance of our neighbour's good name?

Evan. For the maintenance of our neighbour's good name, in this commandment is required a charitable opinion and estimation of others, 1 Cor. xiii. 7; and so also is a desire of, and rejoicing in the good name of others, Rom. i. 8; Gal. i. 24; and so also is sorrowing and grieving for their infirmities, Psalm cxix. 136; and so also is the covering of others' infirmities in love, Prov. xvii. 9; 1 Pet. iv. 8; and so also is the hoping and judging the best of others, 1 Cor. xiii. 5—7; and so is the admonishing of others before we bewray their faults, Prov. xxv. 9; and so also is speaking of the truth from our heart simply and plainly, upon any just occasion, Psalm xv. 2; Zech. viii. 16; and so also is the giving of sound and seasonable reproofs for known faults, in love and with wisdom, Lev. xix. 17; and so also is the praising and commending of those that do well, Rev. ii. 23; and so also is the defending of the good name of others, if need so require. And thus have I also endeavoured to satisfy your desires concerning the ninth commandment: and now, neighbour Nomologista, I pray you, tell me whether you think you keep it perfectly or not?

Nom. The truth is, sir, I did conceive that there was nothing tending to the breaking of this commandment, but falsely charging

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some ill upon another before some magistrate, or in some open court of justice; and that, thank God, I am not guilty of.

Evan. Though you have not been guilty of that, yet, if you have contemned or thought too basely of any person, or have had wrongful suspicions, or evil surmisings concerning them, or have rashly and unjustly judged and condemned them, or if you have foolishly admired them, or unjustly revived the memory of any forgotten crime, or have given them any flattering speeches, or have been a tale-bearer, or a backbiter, or a slanderer, or a listener to talebearers, you, have borne false witness against your neighbour, and so have been guilty of the breach of this commandment.

Or if you have not had a charitable opinion of others, or have not desired and rejoiced in the good name of others, or have not sorrowed and grieved for their sinful infirmities, or have not covered them in love, or have not hoped and judged the best of them, or have not admonished them before you have discovered their faults to others, or have not given to others sound and seasonable reproof, or have not praised them that do well, then have you also been guilty of false witness-bearing against your neighbour, and so have transgressed this commandment. And though you never have done any of these things (and it is strange if you have not) yet if you have had too high a conceit of yourself, or have after a proud humble manner, unjustly accused yourself, or have procured yourself an evil name, by walking indiscreetly and offensively, or have excused any fault by way of lying, then have you borne false witness against yourself, and thereby have transgressed this commandment.

Neo. I beseech you, sir, proceed to speak of the last commandment as you have done of the rest.

COMMANDMENT X.

Evan. Well then, I pray you consider, that in the tenth commandment there is a negative part expressed in these words, " Thou shalt not covet,” &c.; that is, thou shalt not inwardly think on, nor long after, that which belongs to another, though it be without consent of will, or purpose of heart to seek after it. And an affirmative part included in these words, “But thou shalt be well contented with thine own outward condition, and heartily desire the good of thy neighbours."

Neo. Well, sir, I pray you begin with the negative part; and first tell us what the Lord forbids in this commandment ?

Evan. I pray you take notice, and consider, that this tenth commandment was given to be a rule and level, according to which

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