The Idea of a University Defined and Illustrated: I. In Nine Discourses Delivered to the Catholics of Dublin: II. [sic] In Occasional Lectures and Essays Addressed to the Members of the Catholic University

Framsida
Longmans, Green, and Company, 1905 - 527 sidor
 

Så tycker andra - Skriv en recension

Vi kunde inte hitta några recensioner.

Utvalda sidor

Andra upplagor - Visa alla

Vanliga ord och fraser

Populära avsnitt

Sida 178 - But a university training is the great ordinary means to a great but ordinary end ; it aims at raising the intellectual tone of society, at cultivating the public mind, at purifying the national taste, at supplying true principles to popular enthusiasm and fixed aims to popular aspiration, at giving enlargement and sobriety to the ideas of the age, at facilitating the exercise of political power, and refining the intercourse of private life.
Sida 280 - Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased ; Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow ; Raze out the written troubles of the brain ; And, with some sweet, oblivious antidote, Cleanse the stuffed bosom of that perilous stuff, Which weighs upon the heart ? Doct.
Sida 209 - He has his eyes on all his company ; he is tender towards the bashful, gentle towards the distant, and merciful towards the absurd ; he can recollect to whom he is speaking; he guards against unseasonable allusions or topics which may irritate ; he is seldom prominent in conversation, and never wearisome.
Sida 210 - ... our enemy as if he were one day to be our friend. He has too much good sense to be affronted at insults, he is too well employed to remember injuries, and too indolent to bear malice. He is patient, forbearing, and resigned, on philosophical principles; he submits to pain, because it is inevitable, to bereavement, because it is irreparable, and to death, because it is his destiny.
Sida 138 - Felix qui potuit rerum cognoscere causas, Atque metus omnes, et inexorabile fatum Subjecit pedibus, strepitumque Acherontis avari.
Sida 209 - ... while he does them, and seems to be receiving when he is conferring. He never speaks of himself except when compelled, never defends himself by a mere retort, he has no ears for slander or gossip, is scrupulous in imputing motives to those who interfere with him, and interprets everything for the best. He is never mean or little in his disputes, never takes unfair advantage, never mistakes personalities or sharp sayings for arguments, or insinuates evil which he dare not say out.
Sida 257 - Seven wealthy towns contend for Homer dead, Through which the living Homer begged his bread.
Sida 23 - ... the Bible, the whole Bible, and nothing but the Bible, is the religion of Protestants.
Sida 159 - Can there be any thing more ridiculous, than that a father should waste his own money, and his son's time, in setting him to learn the Roman language, when, at the same time, he designs him for a trade...
Sida 280 - Seems, madam! nay, it is; I know not seems. 'Tis not alone my inky cloak, good mother, Nor customary suits of solemn black, Nor windy suspiration of forc'd breath, No, nor the fruitful river in the eye. Nor the dejected haviour of the visage, Together with all forms...

Bibliografisk information