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office. Since that time he has prosecuted his work with zeal, and has carried the gospel into a large district, situated at the foot of the Ghauts. By his means many families have made a profession of Christianity. He has now charge of the congregation at Etavilly, to which several families have been lately added. The people are scattered over a vast extent of country, and are generally employed in cultivating the surrounding hills, which I regret to add is unfavourable to the communication of instruction, as they are seldom to be found at home.

Dodgson is a young man that was for a short time in the Seminary here, in which he had an opportunity of furnishing his mind with a knowledge of theological subjects, an advantage that many we have been obliged to employ have not enjoyed. He has been principally employed at Autekaudu, and in the contiguous villages. Many have beard the truth, but we have had no evidence that any have been awakened by it. The fruits of his labour may appear at another day. He is now removed to Mateodu, and itinerates in the neighbourhood.

Thomas Pleasants received the first rudiments of his education in the School at Mayilaudy. When the Seminary at Nagercoil was formed, he was one of the first that was entered on the list, and enjoyed for some time the advantages of the institution. In 1823, when 10 additional Readers were added to our number, he was one selected for that purpose. His sphere of labour has not been confined to any particular place, but he has laboured both in Travancore, and in Tinnevelly with great zeal. He is stationed now in the neighbourhood of Agatesurum, near to Cape Comorin, where several families have recently embraced Christianity. He told me a fortnight ago, that he feels great pleasure in his work; and that he is making all the efforts in his power to produce a reformation among his kindred.

George Hamilton was formerly employed as schoolmaster at Kanankollum. As he appeared to be a person of considerable public spirit, he was selected for a READER, and has since been the means of bringing

several families under Christian instruction in that place. From thence he has itinerated to the neighbouring villages, in one of which, (Kudankoolum) where he has raised a large congregation, he now resides.

Edward Parsons is brother to the Reader John Oldfield; he embraced the Christian religion in the year 1820, from which time he regularly attended on the means of grace, and made such attainments in Christian knowledge, as to induce us to select him for a Reader at the time when our number was aug. mented. He was employed for a considerable

time at Mundekadu, and had charge of the congregation there. But as persons possessing some knowledge and experience of the Christian Religion were greatly wanted among the new congregations towards Trevanderam, he has lately been stationed at Coolootoory, about half way between this and Trevanderam, near to the public road.

Peter Roe enjoyed the advantage of our Seminary for nearly two years, and during that period manifested a teachable disposition and some pleasing indications that our labours were not in vain. His parents, who knew of no advantages but those connected with things present, after many efforts succeeded in enticing him away from the school. The young man was not inactive while at home, but exerted himself to induce his parents to attend on the means of grace. They came, and for a time manifested much zeal for the new religion, but in the hour of temptation, fell away to the great grief of the son, who, though alternately allured and threatened to forsake the Christian Re

ligion, remained steadfast. He was appointed to his present situation a few months ago, when the person who formerly bore the name Peter Roe had forfeited his situation by a neglect of duty, after frequent admonitions. The young man, now bearing the name, is stationed at Mathavelly, where he is very active, particularly in catechising the people. Several additions have been made to the congregation during the last month.

Edward Lewis Davies is diligently engaged in the study of the Scriptures, and forms a striking comment on the fulfilment of that promise contained in Prov. ii. 5. He has been for several years in Nagercoil under instruction, which I trust has been blessed to his conversion, which affords a pledge that the Lord is with us, and will not suffer us to labour in vain. This with a few more pleasing instances of the same nature, is a compensation more than sufficient for all the sacrifices that a Missionary is called to make, and gives a pleasure that is indescribable. He has no congregation under his immediate care, but itinerates in the heathen towns the people of various congregations. and villages adjacent, and occasionally visits

George Tweedy. Several have been designated by this name; the first of whom fell a sacrifice to the epidemic; and others, after a short trial, were found to be unsuitable persons. The Reader now called by this name is, I hope, a diligent and conscientious man, growing in Christian knowledge, and aiming to walk worthy of his high vocation. I have often observed him deeply affected under the sound of the gospel. His station, for a considerable time, was Manalekaudu, where he was the means of bringing many to attend on the means

grace. From thence he has been removed to a congregation lately formed at Killy. poor, among a class of interesting people, who obtain a livelihood by the loom. This place is about 20 miles north-west of Nagercoil.

Boothroyd Moorhouse. The first called by this name was a young man of interesting talents, but was habituated to lying, a sin very common in India. The person appointed in his place was, about two years ago, impressed by the preaching of the Word. At that time he could not read, but was encouraged to make an attempt to learn; this he did at intervals, which he redeemed out of that portion of time, in which he had to provide a maintenance, by the labour of his hands, for himself and family. He made rapid progress in reading, and in a knowledge of the gospel; and his conduct was so consistent that I was induced to appoint him as the most suitable person I could obtain, to fill this situation, which became vacant about three months ago. He is under a regular course of instruction with the other Readers, and in addition to this he has the assistance of P. Doddridge, a young man of superior attainments, who is stationed very near him. Etambally is the sphere of his labours.

John Meybohm Venning, a very promising young man, to our regret, was obliged to relinquish his office in consequence of a disease which greatly affected his speech. He is now employed in the printing-office. In this situation he conducts himself with the greatest propriety, which, in connection with other pleasing traits in his character, leads me to hope that he is an Israelite indeed. The young man who fills his place was one of the first who entered the Seminary; he has made considerable progress in the English language; and I hope, from the superior ad- ' vantages he has enjoyed under a religious education, he will not disappoint our expectations, but prove himself worthy of the name he bears. He is stationed at Manalekaudu.

Peter J. Hosch, is a very amiable young man, and has a desire to increase in knowledge, but his station is at such a distance from Nagercoil, that he is unable to gratify that desire to the extent of his wishes. I hope to be able shortly to make such an arrangement as will bring him nearer to us. Naiyattangary a populous town, 25 miles from Nagercoil, on the public road to Trevandrum, is the centre of his labours.

Philip Doddridge is a youth who bore the name Thomas Morell while in the Seminary at Nagercoil. Some account of his amiable disposition, and early indications of sincere devotedness to the Saviour, I have already communicated. To bear the name of the

pious and amiable Doddridge, it was thought a more suitable person could not be selected. Since he has been employed, his conduct has been so exemplary, that we indulge the hope of his becoming extensively useful in the mission. He is very attentive to the study of the Scriptures, in the knowledge of which his progress is very evident. He is stationed at his native village, Viragoodyerapu, whence he itinerates to the surrounding neighbourhood, from which a number of heathen families have been induced to join with those who assemble on the Sabbath, and other occasions, to worship the true God.

Of the remaining nine READERS, who are but just entering upon their work, much cannot at present be said.

John Foxell has long made a profession of Christianity, and has made some considerable attainments in divine knowledge. He is placed over the new congregation at Palliaudee, where many families have lately forsaken heathenism, demolished their idol's temple, and are erecting in its place a small house for the worship of the only living and true God. Palliaudee is situated about 20 miles to the north-west of Nagercoil.

John Edwards was among the first that entered the Seminary here; he is a promising youth, and has hitherto given much satisfaction. He is stationed at present at Anandanadenkudy-irapu.

James Rathbone occupies a new station at Resta, in Tinnevelly, a district of some considerable extent, situated on the other side of the Ghauts; rented of the Company by (Mr. Hughes, who is called by Dr. Buchanan, in his Christian Researches, the Philosopher of the Mountains. A few families have recently met together here for Christian instruction. Their teacher, who has been brought up from his infancy under the sound of the Gospel, is zealous and devoted to his work.

John Angear is nephew to the Reader William H. Couper. At Putallam he has discharged the duties of a Schoolmaster with much credit to himself for a considerable time. I hope he will be as diligent in his new sphere. He is stationed at Kanankollum in Tinnevelly.

William Bromley Cadogan was for merly employed as a Schoolmaster at Taveyodu. His conduct has been such as to encourage the hope that he will become an useful auxiliary in extending the light of the Gospel in that dark village, and in its neighbourhood.

Edward Balm is the youngest son of the Reader, S. S. Greatheed. He was educated in our Seminary, and has made the most proficiency of any in the Tamil and English languages. He is a modest

and promising youth, who I trust will be a burning and shining light in this dark corner of the earth. He is stationed at present at Nagercoil.

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William Cooper, is a descendant of one of the first families that made a profession, and has from his youth been brought up in the Christian religion. He was received into the Seminary at Nagercoil soon after its establishment. Since he has left, he has been a schoolmaster in his native village, and in Paenguddy. He is now in a more enlarged sphere of action in Mandekadu; a place notorious for its idolatry, where, I trust, he will be made a great blessing.

John Lochyer is a very interesting person, who has for a considerable time studied our books with attention, and has been induced lately to make a decided profession of Christianity. As I am anxious to give him further instruction in the Christian religion, he is appointed to a village near to Nagercoil, where he will have privileges that those cannot enjoy who are stationed at a distance, and more especially as he will have an opportunity of attending our evening services, at which portions of Scripture are expounded.

Robert Graham is a youth of promising talents, upon whose mind the word of God, I trust, has frequently made a deep impression. He is just sent forth from the Seminary to his labours in the dark villages contiguous; and I am sure that the Directors and the friends of the Society will pray that the blessing of God may go with him.

In concluding this account, it may be proper to remark, that the business of the native teachers is to read the Scriptures, and to teach the catechisms to those people who have made a profession of Christianity in the villages where they respectively reside, and to travel to the towns and villages around, to invite the heathen to forsake their idolatry and sins, and to believe in the Lord Jesus Christ, that they may be saved: to distribute tracts among the heathen and others who are able to read them, and willing to receive them. That this plan, wherever suitable instruments can be obtained, is admirably adapted to propagate the gospel, will appear to every person acquainted with the state of society in India. Indeed, some of the simple facts stated in the preceding pages are sufficient to recommend it to general notice. I wish particularly to hear of its being in universal practice in India.

To render the READERS more efficient for their work, I esteem it an imperious duty to use every means in my power to impress upon their minds the necessity of personal religion, and the importance of studying the Scrip tures. To make the path as plain as I can, besides assembling them every week to hear their reports, and to lecture them on the

most important subjects of theology, as much time is redeemed as my other duties will allow to prepare useful treatises in the language. These, in connection with similar works published by the brethren in the peninsula, furnish a continual variety of subjects for their perusal and meditation. By these means many of them are making rapid improvements, the benefit of which is not confined to themselves, but diffused throughout most of the towns and villages in the south of Travancore, in some of which, through the tender mercy of our God, the day-spring from on high is enlightening the abodes of former darkness, and pointing the weary traveller to the rest that remains for the people of God.

It appears from Mr. Mault's letter, that in 1822 the following Readers wero transferred to Quilon, in connection with the mission at which place they have since laboured. Of six native Readers undesignated, to be engaged in any part of the East Indies where most wanted; two have been engaged at Madras, two at Bangalore, one at Bellary, and one is employed at Combakonum, under Mr. Mead, who removed thither from Nagercoil some time since, on account of the state of his health. The following Readers from Nagercoil have also removed to Combakonum : Glass Kaye, George Clarke, William Urwick, and B, W. Matthias, and are under the superinten. dence of Mr. Mead.

DOMESTIC MISS. INTELLIGENCE.

BAPTISM OF ANOTHER OF THE MADAGASCAR

YOUTHS.

On Feb. 8, one of the Madagascar youths, Rolan Balam, who is about to return to his native country, was, at his own request, publicly admitted to the rite of Christian baptism, in the presence of a large congregation assembled in Grosvenor-street chapel, Manchester. Mr. Bradley commenced the service with prayer; after which, Mr. Roby delivered an impressive address on the occasion, and proposed a number of questions to the candidate, which were answered in such a manner as to afford the highest gratification to all present. Mr. Roby then baptized him by the name of John, and Dr. Clunie concluded this most interesting service with prayer. We understand that the dear youth has since been unanimously admitted a member of the church at New Windsor, under the pastoral care of the Rev. James Priddie, and that pe, culiar interest was felt, both at the churchmeeting and at the administration of the Lord's supper. May this prove one of the first fruitä" of a glorious harvest in Madagascar, for which we earnestly entreat the prayers of all the friends of missions,

In the course of this month it is expected that this interesting youth, accompanied by a missionary and several artisans and their wives, amounting in all to ten persons, will -embark for Madagascar.

NOTICES.

On Sunday morning, the 5th Instant, & Sermon will be preached at Holland Chapel, Brixton, (Rev. Dr. Styles') by the Rev. Henry Townley, preparatory to a General Meeting, to be held in the same place of worship, on Tuesday evening the 7th instant, for the formation of an Auxiliary Missionary Society. William Alers Hankey, Esq. Treasurer of the Parent Society, has engaged to take the Chair, (at Six o'clock). Also one of the Secretaries, and several Missionaries and Ministers, are expected to attend on the

occasion.

On Sunday, the 19th instant, the Rev. William Ellis is engaged to preach on behalf of the Missionary Society, at (Rev. J. Fox's chapel,) Bolton, Lancashire, in the morning, and at Darwen in the evening. On the

following day, Mr. Ellis is engaged to attend the Anniversary of the Branch Missionary Society, at Rev. Mr. Slate's, Stand, near Manchester.

On Wednesday, the 22d instant, the.Anniversary of the Bedfordshire Association, in aid of Missions, will be held at Bedford, when the Rev. Henry Townley is engaged to preach in the morning, and some minister (not yet appointed) of the Baptist denomination in the evening.

On Sunday, the 26th, Sermons will be preached in Sheffield, on behalf of the Society, when Rev. William Ellis, from the Sandwich Islands, is expected, who will also attend a public Missionary Meeting, proposed to be held the following day in that town.

On Tuesday and Wednesday, the 27th and 28th instant, the Anniversary of the Auxiliary Missionary Society, for Leicester, Notts, and Derby, will be held at Derby, when the Rev. George Clayton, of London, and the Rev. William Ellis are engaged to attend.

MISSIONARY CONTRIBUTIONS.

The Officers of Auxiliary Societies are respectfully and earnestly requested to accompany their Remittances with correct Lists, having the Names of Places and Persons alphabetically arranged, as they appear in the Society's Annual Report.

[Collections, Anonymous Donations, and all other Donations of 51. or upwards, received from 18 January, to 16 February, 1826.]

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