Once a Week

Framsida
Eneas Sweetland Dallas
Bradbury and Evans, 1864
 

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Sida 55 - Little remains: but every hour is saved From that eternal silence, something more, A bringer of new things; and vile it were For some three suns to store and hoard myself, And this...
Sida 77 - The general end therefore of all the book is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in virtuous and gentle discipline...
Sida 344 - Heat not a furnace for your foe so hot That it do singe yourself: We may outrun, By violent swiftness, that which we run at, And lose by over-running.
Sida 21 - Wenceslaus, their king, one winter night, going to his devotions in a remote church, barefooted, in the snow and sharpness of unequal and pointed ice, his servant, Eedevivus, who waited upon his master's piety, and endeavoured to imitate his affections, began to faint through the violence of the snow and cold, till the king commanded him to follow him and set his feet in the same footsteps which his feet should mark for him. The servant did so, and either fancied a cure or found one, for he followed...
Sida 79 - ... ere one year and a half they were brought to such wretchedness, as that any stony heart would have rued the same. Out of every corner of the woods and glens they came creeping forth upon their hands, for their legs could not bear them ; they looked like anatomies of death, they spake like ghosts crying out of their graves...
Sida 78 - At a fair vestal throned by the west, And loosed his love-shaft smartly from his bow, As it should pierce a hundred thousand hearts : But I might see young Cupid's fiery shaft Quench'd in the chaste beams of the watery moon, And the imperial votaress passed on, In maiden meditation, fancy-free.
Sida 78 - ... not tried, What hell it is in suing long to bide: To lose good days, that might be better spent; To waste long nights in pensive discontent; To speed to-day, to be put back to-morrow; To feed on hope, to pine with fear and sorrow; To have thy prince's grace, yet want her peers...
Sida 355 - Friday, that even the noble crowd in the drawing-room clambered on chairs and tables to look at her. There are mobs at their doors to see them get into their chairs, and people go early to get places at the theatres, when it is known they will be there.
Sida 78 - Since once I sat upon a promontory, And heard a mermaid on a dolphin's back Uttering such dulcet and harmonious breath, That the rude sea grew civil at her song, And certain stars shot madly from their spheres, To hear the sea-maid's music.
Sida 17 - This night shall be born Our heavenly king. ' He neither shall be born In housen nor in hall, Nor in the place of Paradise, But in an ox's stall. ' He neither shall be clothed In purple nor in pall, But all in fair linen, As were babies all. ' He neither shall be rocked In silver nor in gold, But in a wooden cradle That rocks on the mould. ' He neither shall be christened In white wine nor red, But with fair spring water, With which we were christened.

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