Correspondence of William Pitt, Volym 2

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Mr Pitt to Lady Hester Pitt July 28 Congratulations on
54
Mr Pitt to the Archbishop of Armagh September States
64
The Marquis of Granby to Mr Pitt October 13 Capture
72
The King of Prussia to Mr Pitt November 7 Regrets the death
78
Mr Pitt to the King of Prussia November Congratulations
84
The Marquis Grimaldi to the Count de Fuentes March 5 Steps
95
De Bougainville to Mr Pitt March 25 Soliciting permission
102
Mr Pitt to the King of Prussia in reply
112
The Marquis irimaldi Spanish ambassador at the court of France
116
Sir James Gray British envoy at the court of Naples to Mr Pitt
119
Hans Stanley Esq to Mr Pitt June 9 Detailing his conversa
124
Mr Pitt to Lady Hester Pitt July 2 State of his health
130
The Earl of Bute to Mr Pitt August 14 Expressing
136
The same to the same February 26 France ready to accept
140
General Count de Lally to Mr Pitt September 29 Soliciting
144
Mr Pitt to the Earl of Bute in reply October 7 Doubts
150
The Bishop of Gloucester Dr William Warburton to Mr Pitt
153
The Bishop of Gloucester to Mr Pitt October 17 Defending
160
John Wilkes Esq to Mr Pitt February 27 Application for
166
Sir Richard Lyttelton to Mr Pitt April li Congratulations
172
Prince Ferdinand of Brunswick to Mr Pitt July 20 Thanks
179
The Bishop of Gloucester to Mr Pitt October 24 Abuses
184
Earl Temple to Lady Chatham October 10 Duel between
192
Mr Pitt to Thomas Hollis Esq in reply December
203
Mr Pitt to Baron de Knyphausen February 8 Regrets on
210
The Earl of Bristol to Mr Pitt March 27 Cider bill
216
The Earl of Bristol to Mr Pitt April 6 Changes in the
217
Mr Pitt to Ralph Allen Esq June 2 Giving reasons for
223
The Earl of Bristol to Mr Pitt June 9 Ministerial move
229
William Beckford Esq to Mr Pitt August 25 Enclosing
235
The Duke of Devonshire to Mr Pitt August 30
241
The Reverend Paul Shenton to Mr Pitt December 4 States
299
Mr Pitt to M de Feronce in reply February
305
The Duke of Cumberland to Mr Pitt June 17 Commanded
311
The Duke of Grafton to Mr Pitt July 21 Desires to retain
317
Mr Pitt to Thomas Nuthall Esq September 15 Count
325
The same to the same November 18
331
John Calcraft Esq to Mr Pitt Nov 30 Rochester election
337
George Cooke Esq to Mr Pitt December 10
344
George Cooke Esq to Mr Pitt December 17 Debate in
350
Lord Rockingham to make a part of the present system State
353
1766
361
Mr Pitt to Thomas Nuthall Esq January 9 Expresses
368
Mr Pitt to Lady Chatham February 11 American Declaratory
375
The same to the same February 15 Proceedings on the Stamp
381
The same to the same February 19
388
George Onslow Esq to Mr Pitt February 25 Debate in
394
Mr Pitt to Thomas Nuthall Esq February 28
400
The same to the same March 28
406
Prince Charles of Brunswick to Mr Pitt April 12
412
Mr Pitt to Thomas Nuthall Esq May 11 Complains of
420
The Earl of Northington to Mr Pitt July 7 Conveying a note
425
Lord Cardross to Mr Pitt June 19 Account of Sir James
429
The King to Mr Pitt July 7 Expressing his desire to have
436
The King to Mr Pitt July 13 Interview with Lord Temple
443
Mr Pitt to Lady Chatham July 19 State of his health
449
The King to Mr Pitt July 22 Desires him to attend at
455
The King to Mr Pitt July 24 Final arrangement of
457
The King to Mr Pitt July 25 Acquaints him with Mr Charles
463
The Right Hon Charles Townshend to Mr Pitt July 22
464
Lord North to Mr Pitt July 29 Accepts the joint paymaster
470

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Sida 373 - At the same time let the sovereign authority of this country over the colonies be asserted in as strong terms as can be devised, and be made to extend to every point of legislation whatsoever. That we may bind their trade, confine their manufactures, and exercise every power whatsoever, except that of taking their money out of their pockets without their consent.
Sida 8 - twas but the wind, Or the car rattling o'er the stony street; On with the dance! let joy be unconfined; No sleep till morn, when Youth and Pleasure meet To chase the glowing Hours with flying feet But hark!
Sida 372 - ... they have been driven to madness, by injustice. Will you punish them for the madness you have occasioned ? Rather let prudence and temper come first from this side. I will undertake for America that she will follow the example. There are two lines in a ballad of...
Sida 81 - ... all this was very solemn. But the charm was the entrance of the abbey, where we were received by the dean and chapter in rich robes, the choir and almsmen bearing torches; the whole abbey so illuminated, that one saw it to greater advantage than by day; the tombs, long aisles, and fretted roof, all appearing distinctly, and with the happiest chiaro scuro.
Sida 247 - Could all our care elude the gloomy grave, Which claims no less the fearful than the brave, For lust of fame I should not vainly dare In fighting fields, nor urge thy soul to war. But since, alas ! ignoble age must come, Disease, and death's inexorable doom, The life, which others pay, let us bestow, And give to fame what we to nature owe ; Brave though we fall, and honour'd if we live, Or let us glory gain, or glory give!
Sida 6 - The discipline and evolutions of a modern battalion gave me a clearer notion of the phalanx and the legion; and the captain of the Hampshire grenadiers (the reader may smile) has not been useless to the historian of the Roman empire.
Sida 391 - Burke's company since he has been engaged in public business, in which he has gained more reputation than perhaps any man at his [first] appearance ever gained before. He made two speeches in the House for repealing the Stamp Act, which were publicly commended by Mr. Pitt, and have filled the town with wonder.
Sida 81 - Seventh, all solemnity and decorum ceased; no order was observed, people sat or stood where they could or would; the yeomen of the guard were crying out for help, oppressed by the immense weight of the coffin; the Bishop read sadly, and blundered in the prayers; the fine chapter, Man that is born of a woman, was chanted, not read; and the anthem, besides being immeasurably tedious, would have served as well for a nuptial.
Sida 82 - Then returned the fear of catching cold ; and the duke of Cumberland, who was sinking with heat, felt himself weighed down, and turning round, found it was the duke of Newcastle standing upon his train, to avoid the chill of the marble. It was very theatric to look down into the vault, where the coffin lay, attended by mourners with lights.
Sida 81 - Man that is born of a woman, •was chaunted, not read; and the anthem, besides being immeasurably tedious, would have served as well for a nuptial. The real serious part was the figure of the duke of Cumberland, heightened by a thousand melancholy circumstances. He had a dark brown adonis, and a cloak of black cloth, with a train of five yards. Attending the funeral of a father could not be pleasant: his leg extremely bad, yet forced to stand upon it near two hours ; his face bloated and distorted...

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