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Senator Edwards of St. Charles submitted the following reports from the Committee on Engrossed Bills, which were read:

MR. PRESIDENT: Your Committee on Engrossed Bills, to whom was referred Senate bill No. 104, entitled "An act to amend section 818 of the Revised Statutes of the State of Missouri,” beg leave to report that they have compared the same, and find it to be truly engrossed, and that the printed copies thereof furnished to the Senators are correct.

MR. PRESIDENT: Your Committee on Engrossed Bills, to whom was referred Senate bill No. 124, entitled "An act to amend section 1666, article 9, chapter 24, Revised Statutes of Missouri, concerning Crimes and criminal procedure,"” beg leave to report that they have compared the same, and find it to be truly engrossed, and that the printed copies thereof furnished to the Senators are correct.

MR. PRESIDENT: Your Committee on Engrossed Bills, to whom was referred Senate bill No.102, entitled "An act in relation to judges of probate courts,” beg leave to report that they have compared the same, and find it to be truly engrossed, and that the printed copies thereof furnished to the Senators are correct.

MR. PRESIDENT: Your Committee on Engrossed Bills, to whom was referred Senate bill No. 114, entitled "An act to amend section 3046, article 9, chapter 44, Revised Statutes of Missouri, entitled 'Of justices courts,'” beg leave to report that they have compared the same, and find it to be truly engrossed, and that the printed copies thereof furnished to the Senators are correct.

Senator Cottey submitted the following report from the Committee on Ways and Means, which was read:

MR. PRESIDENT: Your Committee on Ways and Means, to whom was referred Senate bill No. 50, entitled "An act to appropriate money, and provide for the payment of the claim of the Rolla board of education,” beg leave to report that they have considered the same, and report back said bill to the Senate without recommendation.

Senate bill No. 50 was taken up, and laid over informally.

Senator Bland submitted the following report from the Committee on Lunatic Asylum, which was read:

MR. PRESIDENT: Your Committee upon Lunatic Asylums, respectfully make the following report:

By authority of the Senate, your committee visited Lunatic Asylum No.2, located at St. Joseph, and devoted parts of two days in examination of the condition and necessities of the institution, the buildings and the grounds therewith belonging to the State.

THE BUILDING. The building is located about two miles east of St. Joseph, upon a beautiful tract of land, consisting of one hundred and ten acres (110), about half of which is in cultivation. It will be remembered that the building was accidentally destroyed by fire on the 25th day of Janu

ary, 1879.

A joint committee of the two houses of the 30th General Assembly went to St. Joseph, made a thorough examination in reference to the fire, and the condition of the walls and property of the State. They reported that the foundation and a portion of the walls could be utilized in rebuilding the Asylum, and from examination and estimates made by architects, they reported that it would require eighty-eight thousand seven hundred and twenty-five dollars $88,725.00) to rebuild the Asylum as it was before the fire.

The Legislature appropriated seventy-five thousand dollars ($75,000.00) for the purpose of rebuilding the asylum; with that appropriation the undertaking was commenced, and your committee feel pleased, in being able to state that the edifice has been erected in a more commodious and attractive form than it possessed before the fire.

The reconstructed edifice is 328 feet long, the center building 52 feet long and four stories high above the basement, each wing being 138 feet in length and three stories high. The whole building is covered with slate, said to be the best quality. There are also erected to each wing additions 37x64 feet, in which are iron stairways supported in the brick walls, thus affording safe and convenient access to the building at each extremity at all times, and furnishing ready means for keeping the inmates separate. There are also wide and commodious stairways in the center of the building. There are 155 rooms in the present building, which the superintendent reports as being 39 more than were contained in the former building.

The increased number of corridors, passages, windows and openings add largely to the healthiness of the institution, by the improved ventilation, and the facility of admitting light and air to all parts of the building.

The edifice is well heated by steam. The contracts for reconstructing the building was awarded to, and performed by Geo. Alson & Co. of Chicago, Ill. The contract for steam heating, for boilers and machinery, for plumbing and gas fitting, was awarded to, and performed by Sam. J. Pope & Co. of Chicago, Ill.

So far as your committee could learn and were able to judge, the contractors deserve commendation for the manner in which they completed and complied with their contracts, and the State is to be congratulated upon having an asylum of such commodious and thoroughly practical and useful design, presenting such an attractive appearance, so substantially constructed and at such reasonable cost.

The contracts did not include completion of the fourth story of the center building. If the fourth story was completed, it would add about sixteen good rooms to the building. The basement of the building should be cemented and the basement floors should be paved with brick.

To do this necessary work to complete the building, the building commissioners estimate it would require an additional appropriation of five thousand dollars, the original appropriation having been exhausted, except $51.89.

Your committee recommend that the appropriation of $5,000.00 for completing the building should be made. When the building is completed, it will have the capacity for about three hundred patients.

THE PATIENTS.

There are now in the asylum about two hundred inmates, all of whom seemed to be well provided for and attended to; the halls and building in every part were neat and clean. The furniture is plain and substantial, and at the same time sufficient and just such as prudence and a view to fitness would seem to require. The water supply is not as great as the present necessities of the institution demand, and in case of fire would be likely to prove entirely insufficient. We were assured by the superintendent and the president of the board that an inexhaustible supply of water is reached at the distance of a little over two hundred and ten feet, a pipe one and a half inch in diameter having been sunk to that depth, which supplies nearly all of the water now used in the asylum. A very large supply of water is an absolute necessity for an institution of this kind. The superintendent thinks that a pipe of at least four inches in diameter should be sunk for water supply. It could be placed within a few feet of the present pipe and when prepared could be operated with the engine and machinery now used, so that the cost of securing this inexhaustible supply of water could be obtained at an additional cost of about fifteen hundred dollars. A pond that would afford an abundant supply of water for the stock upon the farm, a good reservoir for fish and a supply of ice for the institution could be secured upon the farm and near the asylum at the cost of about $1,000.00.

After having viewed the premises and considered the necessities of the institution, we recommend that $2,500.00 be appropriated for water supplies as above indicated.

Your committee were agreeably impressed with the belief that it is, and has been the constant aim of the superintendent and managers of “Lunatic Asylum No. 2,” to make it accomplish all the good possible under its surroundings, and at the same time to conduct it upon as economical a basis as consistent with proper usefulness. This was eminently demonstrated in the erection of the new building. In consequence of the destruction of the building by fire, and its reconstruction, the institution has labored under many difficulties and disadvantages during the past two years. After the fire many of the inmates were taken home by their friends, yet many remained a charge upon the hands of the managers without proper supply of clothing, and almost without shelter, in the dead of winter.

With commendable promptness the authorities of Buchanan county gave the use of their commodious court house to the use of the patients remaining, and the kind hearted people of the city of St. Joseph furnished clothing and food for their necessities, and the city advanced the money to meet the pressing expenses until the legislature could pass the proper appropriation bill.

The reconstructed building was not completed until early in the year 1880, thus leaving the inmates about a year without suitable buildings and means of care and attention. Since the occupancy of the reconstructed building the number of patients at the institution has gradually increased, and the asylum is now nearly filled with inmates, and is advancing towards its proper sphere of usefulness.

Read and referred to the Committee on Ways and Means.

Senator Bradley submitted the following report from the Committee on Enrolled Bills, which was read :

MR. PRESIDENT: Your Committee on Enrolled Bills have carefully examined and find truly enrolled Senate joint and concurrent resolution No. 6, authorizing and instructing the committee appointed by the Governor to settle with the Auditor and Treasurer, to cancel vouchers, destroy warrants, etc.

The president announced that all other business would be sus pended and directed the secretary to read at length Senate joint and concurrent resolution No. 6, authorizing and instructing the committee appointed by the Governor to settle with the Auditor and Treasurer, to cancel vouchers, destroy warrants, etc., and that unless objections be made he would sign the same to the end that it may become a law. No objections being made, said bill was read at length by the secretary; and the presiding officer, in the presence of the Senate, in open session, no other business intervening, affixed his signature thereto. Said joint and concurrent resolution No. 6, having been signed by the

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President of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives, Chief Clerk of the House of Representatives, and attested by the Secretary of the Senate, was this day presented to the Governor by the Secretary.

Senator Bradley submitted the following report from the Committee on Enrolled Bills, which was read:

MR. PRESIDENT: Your Committee on Enrolled Bills have carefully examined and find truly enrolled Senate joint and concurrent resolution No. 7, instructing our Senators and requesting our Representatives in Congress to procure all necessary legislation to grant to the St. Louis and San Francisco railway company the right of way for its railroad through the Choctaw Nation in the Indian Territory.

Senate joint and concurrent resolution No. 7 was taken up, and the President announced that all other business would be suspended, and directed the Secretary to read at length Senate joint and concurrent resolution No. 7, instructing our Senators and requesting our Representatives in Congress to procure all necessary legislation to grant to the St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad Company the right of way for its railroad through the Choctaw Nation in the Indian Territory, and that unless objections be made he would sign the same to the end that it may become a law.

No objections being made, said bill was read at length by the Sectary, and the presiding officer, in the presence of the Senate, in open session, no other business intervening, affixed his signature thereto. Said Senate joint and concurrent resolution was immediately sent to the House of Representatives for the signature of the Speaker. Senate joint and concurrent resolution No. 7 having been signed by the President of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives, was this day presented to the Governor by the Secretary.

Senate bill No. 51, being special order for this hour (11 A. M.) was taken up, and, on motion of Senator Walker, was made the special order for next Thursday at 11 A. M.

Senator Rogers submitted the following report from the Committee on State Lands:

MR. PRESIDENT: Your Committee on State Lands, to whom was referred the accompanying communication from the State Auditor, with reference to certain erroneous sales of State lands therein described, beg leave to report that they have carefully examined the records in the office of the Register of Lands, and find the facts set forth in the letter of the Auditor to be true, and that the parties to

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