Conversion, Politics and Religion in England, 1580-1625

Framsida
Cambridge University Press, 13 juli 1996 - 240 sidor
The Reformation was, in many ways, an experiment in conversion. English Protestants urged a change from popery to the Gospel, while Catholics persuaded people from heresy and schism to unity. Michael Questier's meticulous study concentrates on the experience of individual converts, but also investigates the political implications of conversion. By discovering how people were exhorted to change religion, how they experienced conversion, and how they faced demands for Protestant conformity, this book develops a fresh view of the English Reformation.
 

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Innehåll

CONVERSION AND POLEMICAL THEOLOGY
12
THE EXPERIENCE OF CHANGE OF RELIGION
40
CHANGE OF RELIGION AND THE END OF POLEMIC
76
THE REGIME
98
HERESY is DEAD AND POLICY is THE LIFE
126
THE COMMON PEOPLE STILL RETAIN A SCENT
168
CONCLUSION
203
Index
227
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Sidan 224 - News from Spayne and Holland" and Its Bearing on the Genuineness of the Confessions of the Blessed Henry Walpole, SJ, Biographical Studies, 1:220-30.
Sidan 213 - ... Rhemish translation, brought him great renown. Since Fulke died on August 28, 1589, and since Barrow refers to the faction which " giveth him a garland in his grave," it is evident that Barrow is writing not earlier than the autumn of 1589. For the views of Fulke on the Church of Rome, see his books, A Retentive, to Stay Good Christians, in True Faith and Religion, against the Motives of Richard Bristow (1580), pp.

Om författaren (1996)

Born in Australia in 1949, John Guy grew up in England. Early in life Guy developed a love of history. He pursued that interest and read History under the supervision of Professor Sir Geoffrey Elton, the pre-eminent Tudor scholar of the late-twentieth century. John Guy took a First and became a Research Fellow of Selwyn College in 1970. Awarded a Greene Cup by Clare College in 1970, he completed his PhD on Cardinal Wolsey in 1973 and won the Yorke Prize of the University of Cambridge in 1976. John Guy has lectured extensively on Early Modern British History and Renaissance Political Thought in both Britain and the United States. He has published 16 books and numerous academic articles. Guy's book My Heart is My Own: the life of Mary Queen of Scots (Harper Perennial, 2004) won the 2004 Whitbread Biography Award, the Marsh Biography Award, was a finalist in the USA for the 2004 Biography/Autobiography of the Year Award (National Books Critics' Circle), and has been translated into Spanish and Czech. Other books include Thomas More (Hodder Arnold, 2000), and The Tudors: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford University Press, 1990). For over twenty years he was co-editor of the acclaimed academic series Cambridge Studies in Early Modern British History; and co-author of The Reign of Elizabeth I: Court and Culture in the Last Decade (Cambridge University Press, 1995) and contributed to The Oxford History of Britain, The Oxford Illustrated History of Britain, The Oxford Illustrated History of Tudor and Stuart Britain, and The Oxford History of the British Isles: the Sixteenth Century.

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