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tion in the original conception of the undertaking beyond that of merely making the greatest possible amount of money beyond that of mere personal glorification; an inspiration looking to an actual elevation of the standard of life among the working people who might be fortunate enough to be indentified with it.

Nothing could be more laudable from our point of view than this, and the Pullman company deserves well of their employes and of all men, not only for what they have accomplished for themselves and their own, but for the conspicuous example they have given the world of the nobler uses of great wealth.

It is our view of the case moreover that even if they had attempted and accomplished much less, or even had made great mistakes, they would still deserve commendation for their manifest disposition to recognize the welfare of their employes as of the first concern to themselves. To the growth of such a sentiment among employers, and the practice of it in whatever degree circumstances may permit in smaller establishments, must we look for the real alleviation of the burdens which labor imposes upon those who live by it.

As to the question of earnings in the various grades of employment, and the cost of living within as compared with that outside the community, we are not, as we have already indicated, disposed to insist that the one be greater, and the other less, than elsewhere in order to demonstrate the advantages of the place. We should rather say that were there to be an actual money balance, or not, at the end of the year in favor of the average workman at Pullman, there must be a balance in his favor in all those things which go to make up comfortable and healthful living, in opportunities for the education of children, and their protection from dangerous influences; in the incentives to self-respect and self-culture, and in all the social, moral and sanitary influences which surround the life of every one at Pullman.

If the workman at Pullman lives in a "gilded cage," we must congratulate him on its being so handsomely gilded; the average work man does not have his cage gilded. That there is any cage or imprisonment about it is not true, save in the sense that all men are oircumscribed by the conditions with which they surround themselves, and imprisoned by the daily duties of life.

It is quite possible that the Pullman community has been organized and developed thus far on a plan as comprehensive as commercial prudence permits, but when the experiment as now outlined shall have become an established success, it would be gratisying to see certain additional features considered, and if feasible introduced for practical test.

To make Pullman the ideal establishment of the theorists, in addition to the option of purchasing homes and the strength which must come from diversified industry, one would naturally expect that when the industry shall have survived adversity as well as prosperity, and the wise and beneficent policy now being tested shall have borne its fruit in a permanent community of intelligent and prosperous workingmen, it may then be found possible to advance them to a share of the profits of the business itself. However this may be, we think we are justified in the belief that, as long as the present management or the spirit of the present management exists, the beneficent features of this most progressive industrial establishment will be extended as rapidly as circumstances may ripen for them.

Let the model manufactory and the industrial community of Pullman city be commended as they deserve for whatever and what they promise to be.

Let them be held up to the manufacturers and employers of men throughout the country as worthy of their emulation.

Let Mr. Pullman and his co-adjutors be assured of the good wishes of all those who seek the advancement of their kind.

CARROLL D. WRIGHT, Chief Massachusetts Bureau of Statistics of Labor.

JOKL B. McCAMANT, Chief Pennsylvania Bureau of Industrial Statistics,

HENRY LUSKEY, Commissioner Ohio Bureau of Labor Statistics.

JAMES BISHOP, Chief New Jersey Bureau of Statistics of Labor and Industries.

H. A. NEWMAN, Commissioner Missouri Bureau of Labor Statistics and Inspection.

John S. LORD, Secretary Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Wm. A. PEELE, JR., Chief Indiana Bureau of Statistics and Geology.

CHAS, F. Peck, Commissioner New York Bureau of Labor Statistics.

JOHN S. Enos, Commissioner California Bureau of Labor Statistics.

John Devlin, Deputy Commissioner Michigan Bureau of Labor and Industrial Statistics.

FRANK A. FLOWER, Commissioner Wisconsin Bureau of Labor Statistics.

E. R. HUTCHINS, Commissioner Iowa Bureau of Labor Statistics. Thos. C. WEEKS, Chief Maryland Bureau of Statistics of Labor.

H. A. NEWMAN,
HENRY LUSKEY,

President.
Secretary.

THE PRINTING INDUSTRY.

NEWSPAPERS.

Tables giving the names of localities from which the returns were received, and the number returned from each, from which the statistics have been compiled.

We publish, by way of comparison, the Ohio report for 1883 on the Newspaper Industry, and it follows our own tabulated statement.

[graphic]

Appleton City
Adrian...........
Albany
Bethany...
Butler......
Brunswick.....
Benton......
Brookfield..........
Boonville.
Buffalo.........
Barnard......
Bolivar......
Bowling Green.....
College Mound...
Columbia.......
Charlesto 2...............
Canton.......
Craig...
Califovia..
Conway...
Carrollton.
Cassville....
Clarence.....
Clayton, St. Louis county.
Clinton.....
Carthage....
Cameron..
Cape Girardeau..

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