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THE ECCLESIASTICAL YEAR. "Not to save thought, but to prompt and inspire it.”—REV. DR. FERGUSON. In addition to the special purpose which these outlines of Sermons are intended to serve, they may be used by persons who spend the Sunday at home. The texts will always be found in the First or Second Lesson, or Gospel, or Epistle for the day. MAY 1.

MAY 19.
St. Philip and St. James Apostles. Fourth Sunday after Easter.
SUBJECT :- HEAVENLY FAITH A SOLACE

FOR

SUBJECT :-REGENERATION, AS TO ITS SOURCE, EARTHLY TROUBLE.

INSTRUMENTALITY, AND FRUITS Joux xiv. 12.-"Let not your heart be troubled, JAMES i. 18.-" of his own will begat he us with ye believe in God, believe also in me.

the word of truth, that we should be a kind of Father's house are many mansions, if it were firstfruits of his creatures." not so I would have told you: I go to prepare Regeneration is here set before usa place for you."

I. AS TO THE SOURCE FROM WHICH IT COMES. Here we have HEAVEX presented to us as—

His own will." L A HEAVENLY HOME. “My Father's house."

II. AS TO THE MEANS BY WHICU IT IS EFFECTED. II. A XAGNIFICENT POSSESSION. Many man

The word of truth." sions."

III. AS TO THE RESULTS WHICH SHOULD FOLLOW. III. A PREPARED PLACE. "I go to prepare a

That we should be a kind of firstfruits of place for you."

his creatures." Wherefore, my beloved IV. AX ASSURED REALITY. If it were not so, I

brethren, let every man be swift to hear, would have told you."

slow to speak, slow to wrath."

" Where

fore lay aside all filthiness, dc.” If any V. AN EARTHLY SOLACE. Let not your heart be

be a hearer of the word and not a doer, &c." troubled." MAY 5.

MAY 26, Second Sunday after East :t.

Fifth Sunday after Easter. SUBJECT:JESCS THE GOOD SHEPHERD.

SUBJECT :--PRAYER-AS TO ITS OBJECT, MEDIUM, JOHN X. 11.-“ I am the Good Shepherd."

AND SUBJECTS. I THE GOOD SHEPHERD LOVES THE FLOCK. The

Johx xvi. 23. -" Whatsoever ye shall asl the Good Shepherd giveth his life for the sheep."

Father in my name, he will give it you." IL. THE GOOD SHEPHERD KNOWS THE FLOCK. 1

I. PRAYER.--AS TO ITS OBJECT. Prayer geneom the Good Shepherd, and know my sheep.”

rally should be addressed to the Father. III. THE GOOD SHEPHERD GATHERS THE FLOCK.

Ask the Father." "Other sheep I have, which are not of this

II. PRAYER.-AS TO ITS MEDIUM. Prayer should jold; them also must I bring, and they

be through the mediation of Christ.

" In shall hear my voice, and there shall be one

my name." fold under one shepherd.

III. PRATER. — AS TO ITS SUBJECTS. – Prayer MAY 12.

• Whatsoever ye Third Sunday after Easter.

should be for whatever God has promised and our need requires.

shall ask." SUBJECT :-THE SORROW OF CHRIST'S DISCIPLES :

MAY 30.
ITS CAUSE, CONTINUANCE, AND CONSUMMA- Ascension Day.
TION.

SUBJECT:-THE ASCENSION OF CHIRIST.
Johs xvi. 22.—“And ye now, therefore, have
SOTTOW ; but I will see you again, and your

ACTS i. 9-11.-“And when he had spoken these heart shall rejoice, and your joy no man taketh

things, while they beheld, he was taken up ; from you."

and a cloud received him out of their sight.

And while they looked sted fastly toward heaven The sorrow of Christ's disciples is here stated by Christ himself.

as he went up, behold, two men stood by them in

white apparel; which also said, Ye men of 1. ITS CAUSE. It was caused by the absence of

Galilee, why stand ye gaziug up into hearen ? Jesus. “ A little while, and ye shall not this same Jesus, which is taken up from you see me; and ye shall be sorrowful.

into heaven, shall so come ir like manner as ye II. ITS CONTINUANCE. Only temporary in its have seen him go into heaven." duration. " A little while."

The Ascension of Christ may be regarded as III. ITS CONSUMMATION. It was to emerge in the closing scene of His First Coming into the joy. "Your sorrow shall be turned into world-the triumph of a conqueror.

He led joy."

captivity captive and went up to His throne

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COUNTESS OF HUNTINGDON'S MISSIONARY SOCIETY FOR THE SPREAD OF THE

GOSPEL AT HOME AND ABROAD.

BATH (Rev. J. Wills). --Secretary and SWANSEA.- Burrow's Chapel SundayTreasurer, Mrs. J. Wood. Collected by school (Rev. J. Whitby). -- Collected Mrs. Allward, 14s. ; Mrs. Menzies, by Henry Tunbridge, 7s. 9d. ; John 4s. 4d. ; Mrs. Watts, lls. ; the Misses Evans, ls. 4d. ; Thomas Evans, Clement, 16s. ; Miss Goldwin, 1l. ls. ; ls. lld. ; George Jones, 6d. ; Henry Miss Sansom, 11. 38. ; Miss Taylor, 12s.; Hacche, Is. 3d. ; Frank Triniman, Miss Eyres, 75. 7d. ; Mrs. Garlick, Is. 6d. ; Thomas Owen, ls. 9d. ; Grace 6s. 6d. ; Mr. H. Jones, 3s. 3d. Roberts, ls. 7d. ; Sophia Pennell, 51. 188. 10d. The Vineyards Chapel ls. 5d. ; Margaret Burns, ls. ld. ; Miss Sunday - school, by Rev. J. Wills, Whitby's Class, 16s. 6d. ; Mr. J. 0. 41. 10s. 3d. Collected by Mrs. J. Whitby, 3s. 6d. ; E. A. Dyer, 13s. 22. ; Wood : J. Wyatt, Esq., 28. 6d. ; Rev. Mary Prout (Harbingers sold), 6s. 8d. C. Knowles, 3s. ; Mr. Kidner, 28. 22. ; 21. 198. 11d. ; deduct for expences, 6s. ; Mrs. J. Wood, 5s. ; Miss Ford, 28. 3d. ; total, 21. 13s. 11d. Miss E. Crease, 2s. ; Mr. Seymour (for WORCESTER.—(Per Rev. T. Dodd.) Harbingers), 3s. 3d. ; Mr. H. Jones (for Collected by Mrs. Hicks, 2s. 6d.; Mrs. Harbingers), 78. 3d. ; Mrs. Wood (for Richards, 93. 8d. ; Mrs. Thomas, 6s. Sd.; Harbingers), 58.-11. 12s. 5d. Total, Mrs. Bevington, 4s. 3d.; Miss A. Farmer, 121. ls. 6d.

11. 38. 4d.; Miss A. Wilesmith, 4s.; Miss TODMORDEN. Weekly contributions A. Price, 6s. 6d.; Miss A. Clift, 6s. 10d.; (per Mr. T. Barker, Secretary), 17. 16s. Miss S. Smith, 3s. 3d.; Miss E. Jones,

CHELTENHAM. - (Per Rev. W. H. 1l. 6s.; Miss M. A. Price, 6s. 3d. Miss Ramsay.) Treasurer, Mrs. Seabright, E. Bosworth, 2s. 2d.; Miss B. Powell, l, Sherbourne-terrace. Collected by 7s. 4d.; Miss E. Wortington, ls.; Miss Mrs. Seabright, 21. 5s. 7d. ; Miss Potter, A. Ward, ls. 2d.; Miss E. Walters, 11. 16s. 7d. ; Miss (Tinkler, 11. 8. 2d. ; 2s. 8d.; Miss F. Kings, ls.; Miss A. Mr. Young, 11. ls. ld. ; Miss Green, Pattison, 2s. 6d.; Miss M. A. Fletcher, 178. ; Miss Smith, 16s. 4d. ; Miss Is. 6d. ; a Friend, 5s. School : Miss Walters, 4s. 3d. ; Mrs. Lloyd (dona. Edmunds' class, 4s.; Miss L. Edmunds', tion), 12s. ; Mrs. Wake (donation), 10s.; 3s.; Miss Price's Bible-class, 10s. 6d.; Miss Straford (donation), 2s. 6d. ; Sun- Mr. Russ' ditto, 78. 6d.; Mr. Whittal's, day-school children's pence, 15s. 90.- ditto, 8s. 4d.; Boys' School, 6s. 10d.; 101. 9s. 3d. ; less expenses, 128. 5d. ; Girls' ditto, 6s.; annual sermons (per total, 91. 16s. 10d.

Rev. T. Dodd), 151. Total, 231. 9s. 9d. * The list of subscriptions from Basingstoke, amounting to 181. 11s. 6d., and from

Margate, amounting to 81. 10s. 9d. will be published next month. Contributions, dc., to be sent to the Treasurer, Mr. FREDERICK WN. WILL%CKS, 13,

Lloyd-square, London, W.C

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TO BE PLACED IN FRONT OF SPA FIELDS CHAPEL,

OPENED 1779.

Mr. Editor, I had hoped to have been prepared with an engraving of the above for the forthcoming number, but the favour with which the matter has been received by so many friends, has necessitated a somewhat enlarged purpose ; and, as it cannot be completed so early as intended, I shall be glad to take advantage of the delay by deferring the engraving and the list of contributions till the next number, when I hope the plan will be definitely settled, and in course of completion. You will be pleased to know I have succeeded far beyond my original expectation; but I shall be especially glad of help from the former students, and the congregations immediately associated with the Countess of Huntingdon and the Free Churches of England, and I again suggest that much interest might be created and valuable help rendered by our young friends, and have pleasure in quoting as an example

Spa Fields Sunday-school. “On the afternoon of Sunday, May 5, the whole of the classes were assembled, with a few of the younger members of the congregation who had been invited to attend. An interesting address was given by Rev.

M

T. E. Thoresby as to the character and work of the Countess, with some incidents in her life ; after which, a collection was made-51. 5s."

Perhaps others of our schools would have pleasure in following the example. The Rev. Thos. Dodd and friends at Worcester have already intimated their intention of doing so.

I continue to receive such expressions of approval as the following (some of the writers I have never seen) :

Western District Meeting. This meeting hears with pleasure of an intended memorial to the Countess of 'Huntingdon in front of Spa Fields Chapel, London, and expresses its cordial sympathy and approval of the same.

W. H. RAMSAY,

Secretary

Better late than never.

Everything connected with the great Countess has a very peculiar interest for me. I first heard the glad tidings of salvation in a Chapel which had belonged to her Ladyship, and I was very early in life noticed in an especial manner by her only surviving daughter, the Countess of Moira, ancestress of the present youthful Marquis of Hastings. I trust you will not be disappointed in your laudable endeavours to perpetuate the evangelistic and missionary spirit of the noble Countess of Huntingdon.

Sincerely do I hope you will accomplish the object on which your heart is set. For us to erect a memorial to one of the greatest benefactresses of our country, whom the grace of God distinguished above many, will be doing that which the generation that has passed away ought to have done. I feel thankful that God has put it into your heart, and that you are determined upon its accomplishment.

I can safely say that I never read of her works without receiving a stimulus to follow her good example.

Mr. Editor, yours faithfully,

F. W. WILLCOCKS.

LETTERS TO THE COUNTESS OF HUNTINGDON FROM

THE REV. JOHN FLETCHER.

(FIRST PRESIDENT OF OUR COLLEGE, AND VICAR OF MADELEY, SHROPSHIRE.)

(Continued from Page 140.)

Madeley, 9th May, 1763. Madam,—I beg leave to trouble your Ladyship with a few lines, to testify my joy that as your day and trials are, so is also your strength, and my stedfast hope that you will find it so unto the end. Thanks be to our glorious Redeemer, I am enabled (in some measure) to follow your Ladyship's example, and to set to my seal (whether it be in the light or in the dark) that all things must and will work together for our good, and the glory of our Lord.

Besides private troubles, by which our Heavenly Father sets new seals to your adoption, I think you feel much on account of the enthusiasm and offence that runs among the professors in London as fire among the stubble. Oh, stand in the gap, Madam-prevent (if possible) its raging further. Use all your interest with Jesus in prayer, and with His servants in conversation or by letter, to stop the plague, and may success answer your wishes and mine. What a comfort it is, in the meantime, to be persuaded that which way soever things turn out, all will be agreeable to our last wish-Thy righteous will be done !"

I have waded through deep rivers of trouble since I wrote last to your Ladyship, but have been enabled to rejoice afterwards, and sing one of the Lord's songs on the bank of deliverance.

The work of grace going on in my parish is chiefly among young people; nevertheless, I buried a month ago a woman fifty years old, the oldest in our society but one, and the first that our Saviour hath called into eternity from the time we joined hand in hand to go to the kingdom of God.

She was all her life what the world called a mighty good Churchwoman -that is to say, a thoughtless, self-conceited Pharisee. When she heard

• The above alludes to the enthusiasm of George Bell, one of Mr. Wesley's preachers, whose language became fanatical in public meetings. He asserted that his "perfection " rendered him infallible, above temptation, and superior to the instructions of all persons who were not perfect. Fanaticism is always infectious. It spread rapidly, and Thomas Maxfield allied himself with the enthusiasts. He was the earliest lay preacher, and received Episcopal orders from the Bishop of Derry. Having alienated several hundreds of the members of the London Society, he opened a chapel near Moorfields, where he continued to labour for about twenty years. Mr. Wesley afterwards proached for him in his chapel. Maxfield's delusion was of short duration..

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