Sidor som bilder
PDF
ePub

Article III.

Boundaries. A jjne shall be drawn, beginning at the mouth of a creek about four

miles east of Niagara, called Oyonwayea, or Johnston's Landing-Place, upon the lake named by the Indians Oswego, and by us Ontario; from thence southerly in a direction always four miles east of the carryingpath, between Lake Erie and Ontario, to the mouth of Tehoseroron or Buffaloe Creek on Lake Erie; thence south to the north boundary of the state of Pennsylvania; thence west to the end of the said north boundary; thence south along the west boundary of the said state, to the river Ohio; the said line from the mouth of the Oyonwayea to the Ohio, shall be the western boundary of the lands of the Six Nations, so that the Six Nations shall and do yield to the United States, all claims to the country west of the said boundary, and then they shall be secured in the peaceful possession of the lands they inhabit east and north of the same, reserving only six miles square round the fort of Oswego, to the United States, for the support of the same.

Article IV.

Indians glven 10 the ^ne Commissioners of the United States, in consideration of the present circumstances of the Six Nations, and in execution of the humane and liberal views of the United States upon the signing of the above articles, will order goods to be delivered to the said Six Nations for their use and comfort.

[merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]

TEEATY WITH THE WYAHDOT, ETC., 1785.

Jan. a. 1786. Articles of a treaty concluded at Fort McIntosh, the twenty-first day 7 Stat., 16. of January, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-five, between the

Commissioners Plenipotentiary of the United States of America, of the one Part, and the Sachems and Warriors of the Wiandot, Delaware, Chippewa and Ottawa Nations of the other.

The Commissioners Plenipotentiary of the United States in Congress assembled, give peace to the Wiandot, Delaware, Chippewa, and Ottawa nations of Indians, on the following conditions:

Article I.

tii?TMrw)1?etmltreTre- Three chief8, one from among the Wiandot, and two from among rtored. the Delaware nations, shall be delivered up to the Commissioners of the United States, to be by them retained till all the prisoners, white and black, taken by the said nations, or any of them, snail be restored.

Article II.

The said Indian nations do acknowledge themselves and all their edgedlprotectionOWof tribes to be under the protection of the United States and of no other united states, sovereign whatsoever.

Article III.

The boundary line between the United States and the Wiandot and Boundaries. Delaware nations, shall begin at the mouth of the river Cayahoga, and run thence up the said river to the portage between that and the Tuscarawas branch of Meskingum; then down the said branch to the forks at the crossing place above Fort Lawrence; then westerly to the portage of the Big Miami, which runs into the Ohio, at the mouth of which branch the fort stood which was taken by the French in one thousand seven hundred and fifty-two; then along the said portage to the Great Miami or Ome river, and down the south-east side of the same to its mouth; thence along the south shore of lake Erie, to the mouth of Cayahoga where it began.

Article IV.

The United States allot all the lands contained within the said lines Reserves, to the Wiandot and Delaware nations, to live and to hunt on, and to such of the Ottawa nation as now live thereon; saving and reserving for the establishment of trading posts, six miles square at the mouth of Miami or Ome river, and the same at the portage on that branch of the Big Miami which runs into the Ohio, and the same on the lake of Sanduske where the fort formerly stood, and also two miles square on each side of the lower rapids of Sanduske river, which posts and the lands annexed to them, shall be to the use and under the government of the United States.

Article V.

If any citizen of the United States, or other person not being an ^^^^l^^. Indian, shall attempt to settle on any of the lands allotted to the dian lands. Wiandot and Delaware nations in this treaty, except on the lands reserved to the United States in the preceding article, such person shall forfeit the protection of the United States, and the Indians may punish him as they please. _

Article VI.

The Indians who sign this treaty, as well in behalf of all their tribes tltI1°d<5fnjnltre^0sf^^ as of themselves, do acknowledge the lands east, south and west of the to certain described lines described in the third article, so far as the said Indians formerly tand*claimed the same, to belong to the United States; and none of their tribes shall presume to settle upon the same, or any part of it.

Article VII.

The post of Detroit, with a district beginning at the mouth of the rojt at Detroit reriver Rosine, on the west end of lake Erie, and running west six miles serT up the southern bank of the said river, thence northerly and always six miles west of the strait, till it strikes the lake St. Clair, shall be also reserved to the sole use of the United States.

Article VIII.

machaoMreTOrvoa11" the same manner the post of Michillimachenac with its dependencies, and twelve miles square about the same, shall be reserved to the use of the United States.

Article IX

ae^ra'torabeade1ivTMK£ It anv Indian or Indians shall commit a robbery or murder on any to united states. citizen of the United States, the tribe to which such offenders may belong, shall be bound to deliver them up at the nearest post, to be punished according to the ordinances of the United States.

Article X

tributed to be di* Commissioners of the United States, in pursuance of the humane

"and liberal views of Congress, upon this treaty's being signed^ will

direct goods to be distributed among the different tribes for their use

and comfort.

Separate Article.

It is agreed that the Delaware chiefs, Kelelamand or lieutenantcolonel Henry, Hengue Pushees or the Big Cat, Wicocalind or Captain White Eyes, who took up the hatchet for the United States, and their families, shall be received into the Delaware nation, in the same situation and rank as before the war, and enjoy their due portions of the lands given to the Wiandot and Delaware nations in this treaty, as fully as if they had not taken part with America, or as any other person or persons in the said nations.

Go. Clark,
Richard Butler,
Arthur Lee,

Daunghquat, his x mark,
Abraham Kuhn, -his x mark,
Ottawerreri, his x mark,
Hobocan, his x mark,
Walendightun, his x mark,

Witness:

Sam'l J. Atlee, I. Bradford,

Fras. Johnston, George Slaughter,

Pennsylvania Commissioners. Van Swearingen,

Alex. Campbell, John Boggs,
Jos. Harmar, lieutenant-colonel commandant. G. Evans,

Alex. Lowrey, D. Luckett,
Joseph Nicholas, interpreter.

[ocr errors]

TREATY WITH THE CHEROKEE, 1785.

Articles concluded at Hopewell, on the Keowee, between Benjamin Hawkins, Andrew Pickens, Joseph Martin, and Lachlan M'lntosh, Commissioners Plenipotentiary of the United States of America, of the one Part, and the Headmen and Warriors of all the Cherokees of the other.

The Commissioners Plenipotentiary of the United States, in Congress assembled, give peace to all the Cherokees, and receive them into the favor and protection of the United States of America, on the following conditions:

Article I.

The Head-Men and Warriors of all the Cherokees shall restore all ftlf p^ne^e^**0TM the prisoners, citizens of the United States, or subjects of their allies, to their entire liberty: They shall also restore all the Negroes, and all other property taken during the late war from the citizens, to such person, and at such time ana place, as the Commissioners shall appoint.

United States to reall i

Article II.

The Commissioners of the United States in Congress assembled, shall restore all the prisoners taken from the Indians, during the late war, to the Head-Men and Warriors of the Cherokees, as early as is practicable.

Article III.

The said Indians for themselves and their respective tribes and towns edgeeroprotection°Woi do acknowledge all the Cherokees to be under the protection of the united states. United States of America, and of no other sovereign whosoever.

Article IV.

The boundary allotted to the Cherokees for their hunting grounds, between the said Indians and the citizens of the United States, within the limits of the United States of America, is, and shall be the following, viz. Beginning at the mouth of Duck river, on the Tennessee; thence running north-east to the ridge dividing the waters running into Cumberland from those running into the Tennessee; thence eastwardly along the said ridge to a north-east line to be run, which shall strike the river Cumberland forty miles above Nashville: thence along the said line to the river; thence up the said river to the ford where the Kentucky road crosses the river; thence to Campbell's line, near Cumberland gap; thence to the mouth of Claud's creek on Holstein; thence to the Chimney-top mountain; thence to Camp-creek, near the mouth of Big Limestone, on Nolichuckey; thence a southerly course six miles to a mountain; thence south to the North-Carolina line; thence to the South-Carolina Indian boundary, and along the same south-west over the top of the Oconee mountain till it shall strike Tugaloo river; thence a direct line to the top of the Currohee mountain; thence to the head of the south fork of Oconee river.

Article V.

If any citizen of the United States, or other person not being an No ciu^of United Indian, shall attempt to settle on any of the lands westward or south- dSniands6"eon n ward of the said boundary which are hereby allotted to the Indians for their hunting grounds, or having already settled and will not remove from the same within six months after the ratification of this treaty, such person shall forfeit the protection of the United States, and the Indians may punish him or not as they please: Provided nevertheless, That this article shall not extend to the people settled between the fork of French Broad and Holstein rivers, whose particular situation shall be transmitted to the United States in Congress assembled for their decision thereon, which the Indians agree to abide by.

Article VI.

If any Indian or Indians, or person residing among them, or who upcrimtaaiS! deUver shall take refuge in their nation? shall commit a robbery, or murder, or other capital crime, on any citizen of the United States, or person

dians to be punished.

under their protection, the nation, or the tribe to which such offender or offenders may belong, shall be bound to deliver him or them up to be punished according to the ordinances of the United States; Provided, that the punishment shall not be greater than if the robbery or murder, or other capital crime had been committed by a citizen on a citizen.

Article VII.

statrare°om°mutlng I* any citizen of the United States, or person under their protection, crimes against in- shall commit a robbery or murder, or other capital crime, on any Indian, ""such offender or offenders shall be punished in the same manner as if the murder or robbery, or other capital crime, had been committed on a citizen of the United States; and the punishment shall be in presence of some of the Cherokees, if any shall attend at the time and place, and that they may have an opportunity so to do, due notice of the time of such intended punishment shall be sent to some one of the tribes.

Article VIII.

^Retaliation prohib- j^. jg understood that the punishment of the innocent under the idea of retaliation, is unjust, and shall not be practiced on either side, except where there is a manifest violation of this treaty; and then it shall be preceded first by a demand of justice, and if refused, then by a declaration of hostilities.

Article IX.

uiTMtradetote8toreg" For the benefit and comfort of the Indians, and for the prevention of injuries or oppressions on the part of the citizens or Indians, the United States in Congress assembled shall have the sole and exclusive right of regulating the trade with the Indians, and managing all their affairs in such manner as they think proper.

Article X.

^special provision for Until the pleasure of Congress be known, respecting the ninth article, all traders, citizens of the United States, shall have liberty to go to any of the tribes or towns of the Cherokees to trade with them, . and they shall be protected in their persons and property, and kindly treated.

Article XI.

Indians to give no , , ,11. . .. r-r * *■<

unit"^dstafesS'lgalnst 8 Indians shall give notice to the citizens of the United States,

i nited states. ol & designs which they may know or suspect to be formed in any

neighboring tribe, or by any person whosoever, against the peace,

trade or interest of the United States.

Article XII.

deIpm1ytocXgre'£nd That the Indians may have full confidence in the justice of the United States, respecting their interests, they shall have the right to send a deputy of their choice, whenever they think fit, to Congress.

Article XIII.

shTp"eerpe?uii.Wend' Tne hatchet shall be forever buried, and the peace given by the United States, and friendship re-established between the said states on the one part, and all the Cherokees on the other, shall be universal;

« FöregåendeFortsätt »