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CONTENTS OF VOL. XIII.

... 294

412

Page
The “ Record” Newspaper

... 159, 406

The Fifth of November Service 163, 270, 271

Edinburgh Review.-Church Rates .. 164

Clerical Attendance at Balls ... 165, 536, 539

John Knox (William Riland Bedford)... 270

Essex Memorials to the Society for Pro.

moting Christian Knowledge 271, 627

“ Geraldine, a Tale of Conscience'

278

Mr. Trollope's Analecta Theologica 279, 418

Pharisaism and Lay Teaching....... 280

The Actual State of the Royal Prerogative

in England in making Ecclesiastical

Canons

283

Mr. Maitland.-Council of Thoulouse

to 301

Questions

301, 542

An Exposition of the Law on Rating

Lands and Tithes under the New Paro-

chial Assessment Act

402

On the Fidelity of Matthias Flacius Illyri-

409

Conduct of Foxe the Martyrologist in the

Frankfort Troubles

Canon of Thoulouse .................

415

Reverence to Churches

416

The Special Services

419

F. W. Newman's Treatise on Logic

422

Diocesan Registers

424

Responses in Church.-Parish Clerks 424

Oxford Deacons—Mr. Coddington.......... 426

Davus—Answer to Questions

426

On Church Rates (Arthur Perceval) 521

On the Rating of Tithe Commutation

Rent Charge.

524

Dr. Pye Smith and the Examination in

the Greek Testament

526

Service in the Irish Language...

528

The Dwelling of Balaam.... 530, 653

Canon of Thoulouse, Letter on the, (John

Evans)

531

Banns of Marriage Forbidden for Scan-

dalous Conduct

533

(William Palin) 648

An Inquiry Respecting the Church of

Rome..

535

“Dominus Deus Noster Papa”.

540, 653

(S. R. Maitland). 652

Answer to a Question of " Davus” (H.

Coddington)

541

Answer to a Question of “ X. Y.". 541

The Registration Bill (William Palin) ... 635

Reply to Mr. Perceval's Letter on Church

Rates (William Goode)

636

Church Fasting and Temperance Society, 642

The Fathers.-Mr. Cunningham's Speech

(John Medley)..

645

SACRED POETRY......... 33, 145, 267, 398

518, 623

CORRESPONDENCE:

Egyptian Magic

37

Altar and Sacrifice

40

Daily Prayer.-Frequent Communion 43

Office of Deacons

45

Administration of the Holy Communion 47
Suffragan Bishops......

48

Observance of the Ember Seasons

49

Sunday Wakes and Feasts

50

On the most Appropriate Appellation of

Members of the Church of Rome 52
See of Sodor and Man (E. C. Harington) 53
Doxology at the Gospel

54
New Form of Wills (G. F. Abraham).. 54
Letters on the Church of the Fathers...... 148
The Meaning of the Benediction...... 154, 416
Officiating Minister's Reception of the
Eucharist

155
Baptism..........

156
Office of Sponsors......

157

Page

Scotch Baptisms

646
Hebrew Typography

651

The Cathedral

654

Appendix to the Paper on Confirmatiou 654

NOTICES AND REVIEWS......55, 166, 302

427, 542, 660

to Pass an Examination in the New

Testament and Scripture History

446

The Home Mission : Ireland.-- Judgment
of Dr. Miller...

558, 680
Tithes in Ireland. --Resolutions intended

to be proposed by Lord J. Russell 565
An Act to Amend the Law for Providing

Fit Houses for the Beneficed Clergy 675
Exeter Petitions

685

MISCELLANEA :-

Extract from the Earl of Ripon's Speech

on the

Bishopric of Sodor and Man 68

On the Church Commission

70

Church Statistics ....

71

Admission to St. Paul's Cathedral... 181
Dr. Hampden

197
The Auchterarder Case

554
The Registration Bill

556
Reasons against the Formation of a Second

General Society for Supplying Christian

Instruction to the British Colonies...... 556
Petition from the Clergy of the Archdea-
conry of Leicester....

672
The Churchwardens of Tiverton............ 674

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THE

BRITISH MAGAZINE.

JANUARY 1, 1838.

ORIGINAL PAPERS.

A BRIEF ACCOUNT OF THE ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORIANS.

NO. VI.

(Continued from vol. xii. p. 611.) The labours of the Magdeburg Centuriators and Baronius had the immediate effect of establishing two separate and hostile schools of church-history. Ecclesiastical antiquity was henceforth the field on which the champions of the Romish and protestant parties fought their fiercest battles; and the history of the church was regarded by too many as little else than a branch of polemical divinity. All things considered, this was perhaps inevitable. The questions in dispute were most of them so purely historical, that the history itself could not but become matter of controversy. It is, however, greatly to be regretted, that the subject should have been first handled on both sides by men holding extreme opinions. This tended to place the parties in more complete repulsion, and to lay down and perpetuate party views of the plainest facts. We still feel the consequences.

For though time and inquiry has produced mutual concessions, and multiplied the points on which all agree, many writers on both sides still obstinately maintain certain favourite positions in a spirit which betrays more of the violence of the controversialist than the calmness of the historian.

The merit of the “Centuries" and the « Annals" as works of learning had likewise the effect of discouraging further investigation into the history of the periods over which they extended. It was felt that both parties had a sort of authorized work on church-history, which it was rather a point of honour to defend than a point of duty to improve. We may generally observe, that a great effort of literature is followed by a state of comparative inactivity, analogous to the exhaustion which succeeds an unusual exertion of the natural body. It was so in the case before us.

Much was done in the former half of the seventeenth century for particular portions and departments of the history and antiquities of the church, but we meet

VOL. XIII.-Jan. 1838.

B

with no complete or original work. The protestants* attacked Baronius; the Romanistst attacked the Centuriators; and posterity has availed itself of the truth which was elicited in the contest. The disputants themselves, however, respectively adhered to their own principles, and scarcely attempted to disengage the truth from the baser materials which had been worked up with it by controversial historians.

By the end of the sixteenth century, the prejudices with which the work of the Centuriators was at first regarded by many of the German protestants appear to have died away, and it was universally received as the church-history of the Lutheran party. But it was a cumbrous and expensive work, which could never be generally used by any but professional students. It was moreover imperfect, inasmuch as it did not extend beyond the thirteenth century. Hence the occasion for abridgments and continuations, which were the only contributions made by the members of the Lutheran community to the knowledge of church-history for upwards of an hundred years. LUCAS OSIANDER was the first of this class of writers, and his labours appear to have enjoyed the greatest popularity. He reduced the “ Centuries” into an Epitome, which, together with a continuation of the history of the church to his own time, was published in separate volumes between 1592 and 1613. This compilations long maintained its ground in Germany. It was translated into German as the volumes appeared; and a Swedish translation was published in 1635. Being itself a work of some extent, it was made the basis of other abridyments; and thus may be regarded as having contributed to extend

• Fabr. Bibl. Græc. xii. 170-175; Walch, Bibl. Theol. iii. 151–159. + Fabr. Bibl. Græc, xii. 163; Walch, Bibl. Theol. iji. 125—127.

I Epitomes Historiæ Ecclesiasticæ Centuria I. II. III. In quibus breviter et perspicue commemoratur, quis fuerit status Ecclesiæ Christi à nativitate Salvatoris, usque ad initium anni Christo ccc. Recitatur autem in specie, quomodo Evangelii doctrina in orbe terrarum sparsa sit : quæ hæreses in Ecclesia exortæ: quæ persecutiones contra Ecclesiam motæ : quibus mediis hæreses oppressæ, et persecutiones sedatæ sint: quos præclaros doctores Ecclesiæ singulis temporibus habuerint : inter quos et Romanorum Episcoporum vitæ recensentur. Sed et Romanorum Imperatorum acta describuntur. Lucas Osiander. D. Tubingæ, 1592.

$ In the epistle dedicatory to the Duke of Wirtemberg, prefixed to the first volume, Osiander thus explains the motives which led him to undertake the work : “ Multa laude digni sunt viri doctissimi, qui infinito propè labore, ex omnibus, quos habere potuerunt, Scriptoribus Ecclesiasticis Historiam congesserunt, (quam Magdeburgi. cam vocamus) eamque in certas Centurias annorum distribuerunt ...... cùm autem utilissimus ille labor multis tomis comprehendatur : et plerunque Theologiæ studiosi magnitudine sumptuum ab emptione deterreantur : Multi verò, et quidem magni viri politici, magnitudine negociorum gravissimorum impediantur, quò minùs tam prolixa scripta evolvere queant; cùm tamen Theologicis lucubrationibus legendis vehementer delectentur; cæpi ego cogitare, an non ea, quæ copiosè in illa Magd. Hist. Eccl. (et plurimis interdum locis) referuntur, possent in Epitomen quandam ita redigi, ut nihil rerum scitu admodum necessarium omitteretur : et simul etiam singulorum annorum series observaretur Plurinùm igitur adjutus Magdeburgicis illis Centuriis (sine quibus laborem hunc nequaquam aggredi ausus fuissem) collegi trium priorum Centuriarum quasi compendium quoddam : quod nuncin lucem dare volui, ne eos, qui dudum editionem à me efflagitârunt, diutius suspensos tencrem."

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