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EACH DAY'S PRICE OF STOCKS

IN APRIL 1802. om Bank 3 peru 3 per Ct. 4 per Cols perCts per Cil Long Short India India Excha. Funda. Souths. O New Om- | Trish | Imp. {Eng. Lott.Englith

Stock, Bk Red. Confois. Consol. Navy. 1797 Ann. Ann. - Stock. I Bonds. Bills. Exlinn. Stock. Ano. ACO. niuri. 5 pcicine Cl. Tickets. Pries. 29 1911

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Meteorolog, Diary for April, 1802, kept at Baldock. Lat. 5.2. 2. Long: S. W. Al-8 A:M:

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W. CARY, Optician, No. 182, near Norfolk - Street, Strand.

si

THE GENTLEMAN'S MAGAZINE,
For
M A Y,

1802.

Mr. URBAN,

North of Ireland, April 14. **HE following Letter and REMARKS have appeared in

the newspapers of Belfast and Dublin, where they have T

excited lo much attention, that you will probably think them not unworthy the notice of your Philosophical Rcaders in Britain, elpecially as the Remarks are given from

a more improved copy, than had there been published. To the Printer of the Belfast News To the following remarks I shall preLetter.

fix extracts from the account or deSir, That the Giants Causeway, situ- fcription given by Dr. Hamilton in his ate near the Northern extremity of the Letters, Part II. p. 26: county of Antrim, is one of the great « The Giants Cauteway is generally est vraiural curiosities, not only in Ire- described as a Mole or Quay, projecting {and, but on the furface of this globe, from the base of a steep promontory has long been acknowledged. It will fome hundred feet into the sea, and is therefore, I doubt not, gratify your rea-' formed of perpendicular pillars of bas ders to communicate to them, Tome cu- faltes, which liand in contact with each rious remarks on the different opinions other, exhibiting a fort of polygon of Naturalists concerning the formation pavement, fomewhat resembling the of the Giants Cawleway; with which appearance of a solid honeycomb. The the writer of this letter has been favour- pillars are irregular pritims, of various ed, by a gentleman of distinguished denominations, froin three to eight learning and abilities, who has long lides t; but the hexagonal columos made this wonderful production of na are as numerous as 'all the others put ture the object of his diligent investim together. xation, and has discovered properties « On a minute inspection, every pilin it which had, escaped former obfer- lar is found to be separable into severa! ness, not excepting the late ingenious joints, whose articulation iş neat and Dr. Williams I'lamilton, whofe Let-compact, beyond expreflion; the conters concerning the Northern Coait of vex teşmination of one joint, always the County of Anirim," 1790), have to meeting a concave focket in the next; 190ch merit, as mul greatly aggravate besides which, the angles of one free our concern for his untimely fate *. quently shoot over those of the other,

It will also, no doubt, afford great so that they are completely locked topleasure, both to Philofophers and Men gether, and can never be reparated with. of Tasie, to learn, that a very exact des out a fracture of these paris. Hineation of this great natural curiolity, "The sides of each column are unpainted in a capital style, has been equal among themselves, but the confinished by Mr. Thomas Robinfou, tiguous sides of adjoining columns are now in Belfast

, whole fine picture of always of equal dimensions, to as to the Battle of Billyoahiuch, at prefent touch in all their parts. in potrettion of the Marquis of Hert But it is not here that our admiraford, was so much admired. In this tion should cease-- Whatever the propieture of the Giants Causeway, Mr. cels was by which Nature produced that Robinfon has not only done juitice to beautiful and curious arrangement of

picturesque and kupendous forms, pillars, to confpicuous about ihe Giants but has paid particular autention to some Cauteway-the cause, far from being ftriking peculiarities in its ftrueture, de- limited to that spot alone, appears to ferving the patice of men of science. have extended itlelf througli a large

* He was nurdered by a mob of affitting in 1797, with circumstances of uncommon cruelty. See'vol. LXVII, p.180, Since Dr. Hamilton wrote, a few columns have been found of even nine fides.

tract

tract of country, in every direction ; extensive precipices disclose to the Naintomuch, that many of the common turalist the materials and arrangement qirarries for several miles around, seemt of the Itrata of which this country is to be only abortive attempus towards coinposed, displaying a variety of the the production of a Giants Causeway *." Balált, of different forms and of a diffe.

I'fhall now subjoin the proniifed re rent principle of consiruction, internal marks, which are to original and fatif. and external ; fuch as is not met with factory, that every judicious reader will or not noticed in any other part of the join with the writer of this letter, in world. hoping that they will be resumed and As we row along the base of these given to the publick in a mole extended ftupendons Façades, weenjoy a scenery form; and, let me add, that the testi- inagnificent beyond description, and mony of to accurate a judge, of the discover many curious circumstances, correctness of Mr. Robinton's delinea- which have hitherto escaped the notice tion, will raise it high in the opinion of Naturalists: I will mention one. of persons of science t. A. B. The Giants Causeway, compared by Remarks on the Accounts given by Na- Dr. Hamilton to a moleor quay, and fup. turalists of the GIANTS Causeway. pored by Mesirs. Desmareit and Rafpe

THE Basaltic Pillars, which in the to be a jet or current of lava running last thirty years have been discovered in into the sea from the base of a volcayarious parts of France and Germany, nic hill, now appears to be a part of and the Hebrides, have excited much one of the original ftrata of our globe, attention, and occafioned many con- placed at its intersection with the plane troverlies among modern Naturalisis. of the sea. This stratum is forty-four

The Giants Causeway was the first feet thick, and entirely composed of assemblage of such pillars i hat attracted Batalt Pillars of that length: it is in notice, and is still admitted by all to be clined to the horizon in a finall angle, the neatett and most perfect group hi- and, when traced from the Causeway therto discovered; but in point of inag, Eastward, ascends obliquely along the Dificence, the particular ipot called 'face of the precipiece. It' culmiuates the Giants Causeway is inferior to at the distance of about a mile from the many others on the fame coast. Mr. Causeway: its upper furface is now Pennant probably knew of no other elevated near 230 feet above the surface coluinns in the North of Ireland when of the sea : proceeding Eaftward it dips he pronounced, that “ Basalt Pillars and finally immerges at Portmoon, twa in Staffa far exceed the Irish in gran- miles Eati froni the Cauleway, forming deur." He was little aware that our at its immersion the vases of two Bafaleic country, and especially our beautiful conical illands. coas, exhibits many miles of vali per Magnificent as the colonades may pendicular precipices, lined with Bafalt be fuppofed, which this ftratum dif columns, in parallel ranges, with a plays in to extentive a course across the magnificence unrivalled in any other face of thele mighty precipices, they part of the world.

are by no means our finelt; the fira. The colonade at Fairhead, in the tum next but one above this is eleven coast of Antrim, is proved, in Nichol- feet thicker, and of course the pillars, fon's Philofophical' Journal for De, of which it also is entirely compoted, cember, 1801, far to exceed Suffa in are fifty-five feet each, and its extent is grandeur ; its olumns being each 250 somewhat greater than the former. The fece long; that is, near five times as intermediate stratum is composed ofanoJong as the tallest pillars at Graffa. ther varietyof Basalt, prismatic, but not

Nor is our fuperioritg confined to columnar: this is fifty-four feet thick. the grandeur alone; pur lowering and The Giants Causeway stratum where

* Appearances of the same kind have occurred 40 miles distanı, near Dromore, in a quarry in the Diman's demesne land, which is beyond the limits marked in Dr. Hamilia ton's map of the Basalt Country annexed to his letters. The country people here and in the North of England, and even naturalists in Scotland, use the iern Whin-Stone as fynonymous to Balalt. Porphyry, I presume, is only another name for it.

This picture is to be dispuled of by rafile to one hundred subscribers at one guinca each, of which near ninety have given their names. Mr. Robinson is a native of windero ere, in Westmoreland, and was a pupil of Roniney's. Of the poetical calents of pim apu his infaat 100, leç our Magazine for February last, p. 156,

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