A Mind For Ever Voyaging: Wordsworth at Work Portraying Newton and Science

Framsida
University of Alberta, 1989 - 328 sidor
Wordsworth depicted Newton, as Roubiliac may well have done in his statue of him, as voyaging, in ecstasy, through God's sensorium. In the Prelude passage from which the title A Mind For Ever Voyaging is derived, and in various others portraying Newton and science, Wordsworth seems to have written for two audiences, the general public and a much smaller, private audience, while seeking to elevate the minds of both to God. Like Pope before him, Wordsworth achieved "What oft was wrought, but ne'er so well exprest."
 

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Innehåll

What Oft Was Thought
3
A Prevailing Practice
59
Linking Together
81
Strange Seas
98
A Kindred Spirit
118
But Neer So Well Exprest
145
The Myth of Wordsworths Reading But Little
183
Wordsworths Attitude Towards Cambridge Undergraduates
191
The Availability of Sources for the Hymn to Science
205
Wordsworths Poetic Expectations in Old Age
213
The Availability of Bulwers Poem
221
The Availability of Hunts Review of Haydons Painting
234
Further Changes Due to Young
241
Abbreviations
255
Bibliography
299
Index
315

Wordsworths Attitude Concerning Acknowledgements
199

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