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II. Time, I dare thee to discover Such a youth, and such a lover; Oh! so true, so kind was he! Damon was the pride of nature, Charming in his every feature; Damon liv'd alone for me;

Melting kisses,

Murmuring blifres :
Who so liv'd and lov'd as we!

III.
Never shall we curse the morning,
Never bless the night returning,
Sweet embraces to restore :
Never shall we both lie dying,
Nature failing, Love fupplying
All the joys he drain'd before :

Death come end me

To befriend me; Love and Damon are no more.

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S O N G.

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I.
YLVIA the fair, in the bloom of fifteen,

Felt an innocent warmth, as she lay on the green:
She had heard of a pleasure, and something the guest
By the towzing, and tumbling, and touching her breaft:
She saw the men eager, but was at a loss,
What they meant by their fighing, and killing so close;

By their praying and whining,
And clasping and twining,

And

And panting and wishing,
And sighing and kisling,
And fighing and kissing so close.

II.
Ah! she cry'd; ah for a languishing maid,
In a country of Christians, to die without aid !
Not a Whig, or a Tory, or Trimmer at least,
Or a Protestant parfon, or Catholic priest,
To instruct a young virgin, that is at a loss,
What they meant by their fighing, and kissing so close !

By their praying and whining,
And clasping and twining,
And panting and wishing,
And fighing and kissing,
And fighing and kissing so close,

III.
Cupid in shape of a swain did appear,
He saw the sad wound, and in pity drew near;
Then show'd her his arrow and bid her not fear;
For the pain was no more than a maiden may bear :
When the balm was infus'd, she was not at a loss,
What they meant hy their fighing, and kissing so close;

By their praying and whining,
And clasping and twining,
And panting and wishing,
And fighing and kissing,
And fighing and kiffing so close.

a

VOL. II.

P

The

The L A D Y's SON G.

I.
A

Choir of bright beauties in spring did appear,
To choose a May-lady to govern

the

year; All the nymphs were in white, and the shepherds in green; The garland was given, and Phyllis was queen: But Phyllis refus’d it, and sighing did say, I'll not wear a garland while Pan is away.

II. While Pan, and fair Syrinx, are fled from our shore, The Graces are banish'd, and Love is no more : The soft God of pleasure, that warm'd our desires, Has broken his bow, and extinguish'd his fires : And vows that himself, and his mother, will mourn, 'Till Pan and fair Syrinx in triumph return.

III. Forbear your addresses, and court us no more ; For we will perform what the Deity swore : But if you dare think of deserving our charms, Away with your sheephooks, and take to your arms : Then laurels and myrtles your brows shall adorn, When Pan, and his son, and fair Syrinx, return,

A

A S

SO

N

G.

F

I.
AIR, sweet and young, receive a prize

Reserv'd for your victorious eyes :
From crouds, whom at your feet

you

fee,
O pity, and diftinguish me!
As I from thousand beauties more
Distinguish you, and only you adore.

II.
Your face for conquest was design'd,
Your
every
motion charms

my
mind

;
Angels, when you your filence break,
Forget their hymns, to hear you speak ;
But when at once they hear and view,
Are loth to mount, and long to stay with you.

III.
No graces can your form improve,
But all are lost, unless you

love ;
While that sweet paflion you disdain,
Your veil and beauty are in vain :
In pity then prevent my fate,
For after dying all reprieve's too late.

A S O N G.

S Ο Ν

H

IGH state and honours to others impart,

But give me your heart:
That treasure, that treasure alone,

I beg for my own.
So gentle a love, so fervent a fire,

My foul does inspire;
That treasure, that treasure alone,

I beg for my own.
Your love let me crave;

Give me in poffeffing
So matchless a bleffing;
That empire is all I would have.

Love's my petition,
All my ambition;
If e'er you discover
So faithful a lover,
So real a flame,
I'll die, I'll die,
So give up my game.

RONDE

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