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FOR THE USE OF THE PUBLIC

AT THE PRESENT IMPORTANT CRISIS.

A NEW EDITION

OF THR

ANALYSIS

OP

THE REVELATION.

BY THOMAS NEWTON, D.D.
LORD BISHOP OF BRISTOL, 1758.

WITHOUT THE NOTES,

AND WITH REFERENCE ONLY TO CHAPTERS AND VERSES.

In Bishop Tomline's Theology, we find Newton on the Prophecies,

2 vol. 8vo., stated to be one of the works, that every respectable, and useful Parish Priest, ought to possess.

BL

LONDON:

T. & W. BOONE, 29, NEW BOND STREET.

APRIL, 1845.

GENTLE READER,

Estimating most highly the piety, learning, and integrity of Bishop Newton-entirely opposed to the miraculous pretensions, including transubstantiation; the various corruptions; the progressive encroachments; the dogmatical exclusiveness; the unholy Inquisition of the Church of Rome- and equally opposed to the modern Romanism, so rife within the pale of the Protestant Established Church and therefore convinced that instead of retrograding one step, we ought to advance many steps, in the Protestant line.Still, the Editor of this re-print, cannot help hoping, be it even against hope, that whilst there continues abundant cause, for using every exertion, to promote the blessed Reformation ; there may be room, on the awful subject of this Analysis, for further investigation, and for deducing a somewhat less appalling interpretation.

Vide-Reprint of Conyers Middleton on the Primitive Fathers, combined with Short Letters on the Church of England, in 12mo. boards.- Published by T. & W. Boone, New Bond Street.

After much consideration, tho' I am not inclined with some (page 200), to question the genuineness of the Book of Revelation; still I cannot think it pru. dent or charitable to trust to, or act upon, the supposition that after the completion of six thousand years from the creation (page 198), a Millennium is to commence, involving the total destruction of the City, and Church of Rome. But there is no occasion for this alternative; as there can be no certainty about any Prophecy, that remains to be fulfilled. I quite agree with the Bishop, that there is no feasible pretence for supposing that any Millennium has already taken place; and that we must leave to time to Eclairise the particulars of this deep mystery. The general tenor of Scripture seems at least to imply, that the Redeemer will not appear again, till be shall come, in full power, to judge the world. “Then cometh the end,” we read," when He shall have delivered up the kingdom to God, even the Father, that God may be all in all.”-Postcript note by the Editor.

Chapter XX. (page 100) contains all the leading arguments on this subject.

ANALYSIS

OF THE REVELATIO N.

IN TWO PARTS.

PART I. It is very useful, as well as very curious and entertaining, to trace the rise and progress of religions and governments; and in taking a survey of all the different religions and governments of the world, there is none perhaps that will strike us more with wonder and astonishment than that of Rome, how such a mystery of iniquity could succeed at first and prosper so long, and under the name of Christ introduce Antichrist. Other heresies and schisms have obtained place and credit among men for a time, and then have been happily exposed and suppressed.

Arianism once succeeded almost universally; for a while it grew

and flourished mightily, but, in process of time, it withered and faded away. But Popery hath now prevailed, I know not how many centuries, and her renowned hierarchs have not, like the fathers of other sects, stole into secret meetings and conventicles, but have infected the very heart of the Christian church, and usurped the chief seat of the western world: have not only engaged in their cause private persons, and led captive silly women, but have trampled on the necks

B

of princes and emperors themselves, and the lords and tyrants of mankind have yet been the blind slaves and vassals of the holy see.

Rome Christian hath carried her conquests even farther than Rome Pagan. 'The Romanists themselves make universality and perpetuity the special marks and characters of their church; and no people more industrious than they in compassing sea and land to make proselytes.

All sincere Protestants cannot but be greatly grieved at the success and prevalence of this religion, and the Papists as much boast and glory in it, and for this reason proudly denominate theirs the catholic religion. But it will abate all confidence on the one hand, and banish all scruples on the other, if we consider that this is nothing more than what was signified before hand by the Spirit of prophecy. It is directly foretold, that there should be such a power as that of the pope of Rome exercised in the Christian church, and that it should prevail for a long season, but at last should have a fall. Several clear and express prophecies to this purpose have been produced out of Daniel and St. Paul in the course of the dissertations: but others clearer still, and more copious and particular, may be found in the Apocalypse or Revelation of St. John, who was the greatest as he was the last prophet of the Christian dispensation, and hath comprehended in this book, and pointed out the most memorable events and revolutions in the church, from the apostle's days to the consummation of the mystery of God.

But to this book of the Apocalypse or Revelation

There are twenty-three preceding Dissertations. This portion is confined to the Apocalypse.

it is usually objected, that it is wrapt and involved in figures and allegories, is so wild and visionary, is so dark and obscure, that any thing or nothing, at least nothing clear and certain, can be proved or collected from it. So learned a man as Scaliger is noted for saying that Calvin was wise, because he wrote no comment upon the Revelation. A celebrated wit and divine of our own church hath not scrupled to assert, that that book either finds a man mad, or makes him so. Whitby, though an useful commentator on the other books of the New Testament, would not yet adventure upon the Revelation.

- I confess I do it not (says he,) for want of wisdom; that is, because I have neither sufficient reading nor judgment to discern the intendment of the prophecies contained in that book.” Voltaire is pleased to say, that Sir Isaac Newton wrote his comment upon the Revelation, to console mankind for the great superiority that he had over them in other respects: but Voltaire, though a very agreeable, is yet a very superficial writer, and often mistaken in his judgment of men and things. He never was more mistaken, than in affirming that Sir Isaac Newton has explained the Revelation in the same manner with all those who went before hin: a most evident proof that he had never read either the one or the other, for, if ever he had read them, he must have perceived the difference. However, it is undeniable, that even the most learned men have miscarried in nothing more than in their comments and explanations of this book. To explain this book perfectly is not the work of one man or of one aged and probably it will never all be clearly understood

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