The Gentlemen's Book of Etiquette and Manual of Politeness: Being a Complete Guide for a Gentleman's Conduct in All His Relations Towards Society : Containing Rules for the Etiquette to be Observed in the Street, at Table, in the Ball Room, Evening Party, and Morning Call : with Full Directions for Polite Correspndence, Dress, Conversation, Manly Exercises, and Accomplishments : from the Best French, English, and American Authorities

Framsida
Locke, 1873 - 332 sidor
 

Så tycker andra - Skriv en recension

Vi kunde inte hitta några recensioner.

Utvalda sidor

Innehåll

I
11
II
31
IV
50
V
66
VI
75
VII
91
VIII
116
IX
154
XI
183
XII
186
XIII
222
XIV
228
XV
244
XVI
252
XVII
280
XVIII
294

X
176
XIX
298

Andra upplagor - Visa alla

Vanliga ord och fraser

Populära avsnitt

Sida 45 - Is not the whole land before thee? separate thyself, I pray thee, from me : if thou wilt take the left hand, then I will go to the right ; or if thou depart to the right hand, then I will go to the left.
Sida 187 - Talent is something, but tact is everything. Talent is serious, sober, grave, and respectable ; tact is all that and more too. It is not a sixth sense, but it is the life of all the five. It is the open eye, the quick ear, the judging taste, the keen smell, and the lively touch ; it is the interpreter of all riddles — the surmounter of all difficulties — the remover of all obstacles.
Sida 305 - When an awkward fellow first comes into a room, it is highly probable that his sword gets between his legs and throws him down, or makes him stumble, at least.
Sida 48 - And Paul said, I would to God, that not only thou, but also all that hear me this day, were both almost, and altogether such as I am, except these bonds.
Sida 48 - But he said, I am not mad, most noble Festus, but speak forth the words of truth and soberness.
Sida 91 - Dancing is in itself a very trifling, silly thing ; but it is one of those established follies to which people of sense are sometimes obliged to conform, and then they should be able to do it well. And though I would not have you a dancer, yet when you do dance I would have you dance well, as I would have you do everything you do well.
Sida 308 - To begin a story or narration, when you are not perfect in it, and cannot go through with it, but are forced, possibly, to say in the middle of it, " I have forgot the rest," is very unpleasant and bungling.
Sida 307 - ... looks, and their words; and yet without staring at them, and seeming to be an observer. This quick and unobserved observation is of infinite advantage in life, and is to be acquired with care ; and, on the contrary, what is called absence, which is a thoughtlessness, and want of attention about what is doing, makes a man so like either a fool or a madman, that, for my part, I see no real difference. A fool never has thought ; a madman has lost it; and an absent man is, for the time, without it.
Sida 323 - What is commonly called an absent man, is commonly either a very weak, or a very affected man ; but be he which he will, he is, I am sure, a very disagreeable man in company. He fails in all the common offices of civility; he seems not to know those people to-day, with whom yesterday he appeared to live in intimacy. He takes no part in the general conversation; but, on the contrary, breaks into it from time to time with some start of his own, as if he waked from a dream.
Sida 91 - Remember, that the graceful motion of the arms, the giving your hand, and the putting on and pulling off your hat genteelly, are the material parts of a gentleman's dancing. But the greatest advantage of dancing well is, that it necessarily teaches you to present yourself, to sit, stand, and walk, genteelly ; all of which are of real importance to a man of fashion.

Bibliografisk information