The Metaphysics of Sir William Hamilton

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Sever and Francis, 1861 - 563 sidor
 

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Sida 472 - ... neither oblique nor rectangle, neither equilateral, equicrural, nor scalenon ; but all and none of these at once. In effect, it is something imperfect, that cannot exist ; an idea wherein some parts of several different and inconsistent ideas are put together.
Sida 354 - The table which we see, seems to diminish, as we remove farther from it : But the real table, which exists independent of us, suffers no alteration : It was therefore nothing but its image which was present to the mind. These are the obvious dictates of reason...
Sida 13 - ... with their correlatives freedom of choice and responsibility — man being all this, it is at once obvious that the principal part of his being is his mental power. In Nature there is nothing great but Man, In Man there is nothing great but Mind.
Sida 353 - But this universal and primary opinion of all men is soon destroyed by the slightest philosophy, which teaches us that nothing can ever be present to the mind but an image or perception...
Sida 115 - THE Mind, being every day informed, by the Senses, of the alteration of those simple Ideas, it observes in things without; and taking notice how one comes to an end, and ceases to be, and another begins to exist, which was not before; reflecting also on what passes within it self, and observing a constant change of its Ideas, sometimes by the impression of outward Objects on the Senses...
Sida 481 - THE assignation of particular names to denote particular objects, that is, the institution of nouns substantive, would, probably be one of the ' first steps towards the formation of language. Two savages, who had never been taught to speak, but had been bred up remote from the societies of men, would naturally begin to form that language by which they would endeavour to make their mutual wants intelligible to each other, by uttering certain sounds, whenever they meant to denote certain objects.
Sida 240 - ... death, the girl herself refused to stay. Anxious inquiries were then, of course, made concerning the pastor's habits; and the solution of the phenomenon was soon obtained. For it appeared, that it had been the old man's custom, for years, to walk up and down a passage of his house into which the kitchen door opened, and to read to himself with a loud voice, out of his favorite books.
Sida 473 - One universal name is imposed on many things, for their similitude in some quality, or other accident; and whereas a proper name bringeth to mind one thing only, universals recall any one of those many.
Sida 383 - ... from making any judgment about distances, that he thought all objects whatever touched his eyes (as he expressed it), as what he felt did his skin ; and thought no objects so agreeable as those which were smooth and regular, though he could form no judgment of their shape, or gusss what it was in any object that was pleasing to him.
Sida 471 - Whether others have this wonderful faculty of abstracting their ideas, they best can tell : for myself I find indeed I have a faculty of imagining, or representing to myself the ideas of those particular things I have perceived, and of variously compounding and dividing them.

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