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that Mr. Villettes at last gave way to his December, Faron was taken by surprise (but son's inclinations, and obtained for him, in not by the fault of any British oficer); and the year 1775, a cornetry in the 10th regi- Fort Mulgrave, the nearest post to Les ment of dragoons. In this respectable curpa, Sablettes, was carried by storm. These disa Villertes continued till he rose to the rank of asters rendered che evacuation of Toulon unmajor. In this, as in every other part of his avoidable. The Neapolitan troops, andes Jife, a punctual discharge of the duties of his the command of Colonel Villettes, behaved station was constantly observed. By this he very well as long as they were exposed to no obtained the approbation of his superiors, and danger; but when they saw that Fort Mola by his amiable manners he secured the esteem grave was lost, and the French appeared ready and good will of his equals and his inferiors. to attack them, they retired in a body, gol During a great part of this period, Capt. Vil. into their boats, and embarked on board their Jette's attended Sir W. Pitt (then commander ships. Notwithstanding the desertion of so of the forces in Ireland) as his aid de-camp great a part of his force, Colonel Villettes and secretary. The character of that venera- kept up so good an appearance with the me We officer requires no panegyric; and it certain mainder, that Les Sablerces, and, of course, It was an honour to Villettes, that he lived the whole of the peninsula, continued in our several years in his family, not only as his possession till the evening of the 18th; wbca secretary, but as his confidential friend. His the evacuation of Toulon being complete, le attachment to Sir William Pitt was, indeed, received orders to withdraw his troops. This that of a son to a parent; and, like all other service, though rendered very difficult by the attachments that he formed, contigued in- proximity of the enemy, was never heless variable to the end of his life. In the year elected during the night, and the troops 1792, Major Villettes quitted the dragoons, were marched to the other end of the penis. and was appointed lieutenant-colonel of the sula, where they were embarked in boats, 691h regiment of foot; which, in conse. which conveyed them, without loss, on board quence of the breaking out of the war in the flect. The next service in which Colend 1793, was sent to the Mediterranean, serving Villettes was engaged, was ths congues: af as marines on board a division of the fleet Corsica. He acted here in his proper station under the command of Lord Hood. From at the siege of Saint Fiorenzo; and afterwards this service Colonel Villettes was exempt, as in a more distinguished manner, at that all a neid oficer ; but when Toulon was given Bastia. Lord Hood having proposed to the up to the allies, he left England to take the commander of the land forces the attack of command of his regiment, then forming a this latter place, and the measure being dain part of the garrison, His services there were ed inexpedient by that officer, his lordship much distinguished by General O'Hara, and resolved to undertake the siege, without his successor, General Dundas. The heights assistance of any troops but those who wers of Faron were entrusted to him; and during originally given him as marines. After a close the time that he commanded in that impor- blockace of forty daye, Bastia was taken, and tant station, his vigilance was such, that he Lord Hood gratefully acknowledged the es. never retired to rest till day-light appeared. sential assistance which he received on Make All attempts at surprise were accordingly occasion from Colonel Villettes. The maig frustrated, and every thing remained secure; of this service will perhaps be more fully as the strength of the position scarcely exposing preciated, when it is known, that the force it to any other danger. At length, the which Colonel Vallettes commanded French army being increased, after the reduc- composed of no more than 1000 bridisk na tion of Lyons, the danger to which Toulon diers, 50 landed seamen, and 1900 Corsican became exposed was proportionally, greater, which last were fit only to scour the counter and Colonėl Villettes was cailed to a station The gars Ison, on the other hand, consinted of of still more importance, and requiring the 4000 French regulars, and about as may a execution of greater military talents. This the armed inhabitants. Even after the sun was the defence of Les Sablettes,' a narrow render of the place, the didiculties of Coloma isthmus, by which the peninsula that forms Villettes situation did not cesses with hi! the south side of the road of Toulon is con. small force, he was to guatd 8000 prende nected with the main land. As long as this and this arduous task was continued deres post was in our possession, tbe whole penin- days, the stave of the weather sendetin sula was secure, and the ships could remain impossible to send them away in a in safety in the road; but i this had been lost, time." For tins important service Cela the various batteries on the peninsula might Villelces was rewarued, by being on have been turned upon thens, the shipping Governor of Bastia; and a vate u mast have removed into the bay, and the him being propused in the House subsequent embarkation of the troops and the mons, it seemed to be a subject of inhabitants would have been renoered in. with every person, that some and practicable. At this post Colonel Viilettes of parliamentary etiquegle renderet communded ; having under him 700 British, sible to acccde to the mention b y and BOU Nc. pollcas trcops. On the 1ấth of 1796, an intermittent Jordan

kind, which is common in Corsica; obliged during his command in Malta, in which Colonel Villettes to resign the government these qualities were exerted, and executed of Bastia, and retorn to England; and the with the very best effects. When Tomasi, following vear, Portugal being threatened by the French-elected Grand Master, laid claiza the French, he was sent to that country, and to the island; when a French Agent sought served in the army commanded by his friend an occasion of quarrel, and endeavoured co Sir Charles Stuart, abo'it a year and a lialf; raise a disturbance in the theatre, as had beea, when, the danger being for the present re. done successfuily at Rome, Naples, and else.. moved, the British troops were withdrawn, where ; when a most alarming mu'jay took and Colonel Villettes came back to England, place among the foreign troops in Fort Rica. where he was promoted to the rank of a major soli; on all these, and on many other pocasions. general, on the 18th of June, 1799. About the firm, temperate, and judicious conduct of this time, General Villettes was appointed Gen. Villettes was successfully employed comptroller of the houschold of his Royal In the year 1807, the personal and profesHighness the Duke of Kent; and his royal sional merit of this officer, his perfect knowhighness continued to honour che genc. ledge of most of the European languages, and ral with his confidence as long as he lived. his long acquaintance with the military sys In 1799, General Villeites was sent to Corfu; tems of the continental powers, pointed him it being than in contemplation to raise a corps out to his Majesty's government as a proper of Albaniads for bis Majesty's service. Of person to command the foreign troop, who che inexpediency of this measure the general were to form a part of the army intended to was soon convinced; and however advantage be sent to the Baltic, under Lord Cachcan. aus the adopting it inight have proved to Gen. Villettes was accordingly re-calia himself, he strongly advised the contrary, and from Malta; but, though he obeyed the the plan was accordingly relinquished. The summons with the utmost promptitude, mutiny which some years afterwards took place it was found impossible for him to arrive at Malta among troops of a simi ar descrip- in England in time to take any share in the tion, fully proved the justness of his opinion. northern expedition. That expedition was When his presence was no longer necessary accordingly disp tched under other com. in Corfu, Gen Villetes was sent to Malta; manders, and Gen. Villettes was, soon after where he acted for some time as second in his arrival, appointed to a situation still more command to Gen. Pigot; and, after his de- sonourable, but eventually fatal to him. It parture in 1801, as commander in chief of Was in the month of September, 1807, that this the forces, in which important situation he Officer, now a Lieutenant-general, returned remained till the year 1807. Those persons to England, a country in which he had who recollect the stipulations concerning passed so small a portion of his life, as to be Malta in the treaty of Amiens, the discus. much less known in it than his worth dee sions which arose during the peace in conse served. He was soon after appointed Colognence of those stipulations, and the value pel of the 64th regiment of infantry, and attached to this island by all parties since his talents were not suffered to remain long the renewal of bostilities; and who, at the unemployed. A proper person was wanted same time, consider the situation of Malta, to be commander of the forces, and Lieutes with respect to Naples, Sicily, Egypt, and nant-governor, of Jamaica. Many circum..: indeed the whole of the Mediterranean and the stances in the situation of chat Island roa Levant, will readily conceive that there were dered it necessary to be particularly careful few situations, in which a firm, tensperate, in the appointment of a general officer suited and judicious conduct could be more requisite to that important trust. Gen. Villettes was than in the commander of the forces in that selected for this purposes and it would, picha island. - It may safely be asserted, that few haps, have been difficult to have found a min men were superior to Gen. Villetres in the more capable of fulfilling the duties of the qualities from which cuch'a conduct origi- station to the satisfaction of Government, and Dates. His judgment was 60 good, that, for the benefit of the cology. He was acourtthough he seloom stoud in need of advice, ingly appointed Lieutenant-governor and yec, on every proper occasion, he was ready commander of the forces in Jamaica, with to listen to it; to adopt it with candous, if he the rank of a General in zbat Island, in the judged it to be right; or to adhere to his luiter end of the year 1807. Highly honourown opinion, if he saw no just gronods for able as this appointment was, Gen. Villetras abandoning it. His fumness in pursuiog the would willingly have declined it. His copline of conduer, which he thought it his duty stitution, which was never very strong, hed co adopt, was equally remarkable; and to been much impaired by bilious complaints

chese qualities were united a temper the least and having been absent from England, duriors - irritableand manners the most conciliatory, almost the whole of the last fourteen years, Schat can be well imagined The tavourite he would gladly have remained sorge time in

maxim of a Suaviter in mode, Tortiter in this country. The last day before he es.. re" has perhaps seldom been more per. barked at Spichead, was spent at the bouse of fely exemplified Many ibstances occurred the earliest friend of bis youth, to whom, in

confident 14

confidential conversation, he expressed his be- late friend the Hon. Sir C. Stuart. Mr. lief, that the climate of Jamaica would not Westmacott is employed as the sculptor ; agree with him ; " but," he added, “I and the following inscription is to be engraved would not object to going there on that ac. on the marble: count; for if I were ordered to march up to

" Sacred to the memory of a battery, I should do it, though I might be Lieut.-Gen. WILLIAM ANNE VILLETTES, of opinion that I should be killed before my (second son of Arthur Villettes, Esq. his troops could carry it; and, in like manner, Majesty's Minister Plenipotenciary at the I think I ought not to hesitate as to going to Court of Turin, and to the Helvetic Cantons,) Jamaica, if his Majesty's service requires it, who, during a period of thirty three years, though I may be of opinion that I shall fall rendered essential service to his country, as a victim to the climate.” But little is known Toulon, in Corsica, at Malta, and in many in England of what happened in Jamaica du- other places. In consideration of these resa ring che short period that General Villettes vices, he was appointed Colonel of the 6ith lived after his arrival in that island. It is, regiment of Infantry, and Lieutenant Gover. however, well known, that his amiable dis. nor and Commander of the Forces in Jamaica; position, and hat firm, but conciliatory con- but, while engaged in a tour of military induct, which always formed so remarkable a spection in that island, he was seized with a part of his character, soon engaged the confi- fever, and died near Port Antonio, on the dence and esteem of the whole community. 13th of July, 1808, aged 54 years, I worthy In the month of July, 1308, he undertook a member of society was thus taken frons the military tour of inspection through clic island. public; a valuable officer was lost to the Neither the bad state of his health, nor the King's service; and the Island of Jamaica unfavourable weather, could induce him to was deprived of a man well calculated to pro. postpone doing what he considered to be his mote its happiness and prosperity. His resia duty. General Villettes left Kingston on the dence there was indeed short; yet his many 3d of July, and proceeded as far Port Antonio, but mild virtues, his dignified but affable de. where he inspected some of the troops. He portment, and his firm but conciliatiog conset out from thence on the 11th, to go to duct, had secured him the confidence and Buff Bay, in the parish of St. George, to in- esteem of the whole community spect a battalion of the 60chi, which was “The sculptur'd marble shall dissolve indust, stationed there; but in this journey he was And fame, and wealth, and honours, page seized with a fever, which, on the third day,

away : put a period to his life. He died on the 13th Not such the triumphs of the good and just. July, at Mrs. Brown's estate, named Union; Not such the glories of eternal day." retaining in his last momen's the same sere- At Cronroe, 1. Ambrose Eccles, eso. a chanity of mind for which his whole life had racter of ihe highest respectability. A profound been so rentorkably discioguished. The re- scholar, a perfect gentleman, he was an orliagret expressed on this occasion by all descrip- ment ro society. Asa critic, he was distinguish. tions of persons in Jamaica, far exceeded what ed amongst the commentators on Shakespeare. conld have been supposed possible, when the On the qualities of his heart, it is not, at short period that General Villettes had resided present, intended to expatiate. We shall among them is taken into consideration. His only observe, that, perhaps a purer spirit body was interred near Kingston, in the pa. never stood before the throne of the Almighty Tish of Half. Way-Tree, in which he resided. than that of the subject of this article. Pero The funeral was a:tended by the Duke of Man baps a better husband, a better father, and, chester (che Governor of the island), as chief in every respect, a belter man never existed. mourner, and was conducted with all the mic But full justice will, we trust, yet be done to litary bunours so justly due to the rank and his memory. Nothing more is now intended merit of the deceased. Few men bave pose than an hasty sketch of his life and character. Sessed, in a degree superior to General Vil. After a regular course of education, in the lettes, the talent of a quiring the good will coilege of Dublin, he went to the Continent. of almost all, the ill will of scarcely any, who Here his stay was not long. From Frana knew him. The chief reason w2s, that he he proceeded to Italy, but ill health limited feit good will towards all, and his conduct his tour in that interesting country From was suitable to his feelings. His friendship, Rome he returned to Florence, where he though by no means restricted to a lew, was studied the Italian language, with great 3:51 far from being indiscriminate; but any person duity and success, under a celebratca prue who once reaily enjoyed it, was sure that it fessor. But he was soon compelles te be would never be withdrawn On the applica- state of his health, to return homs. On bin tion of three friends of the lare Liculenant- way, he paused in London, where he creGeneral Villaires, the Dean and Chapter of erived to reside sometime, axsociariag wie Westminster have consent that a monument some of the remarkable literary char2017 should be placed to the memory of that much the day. With the late Dr. Johnson, the lanienced vitcer, ued the monument of his lousted no intimacy, but he had moet lan ut Tom Davies's, and paid the most respectful The praise bostowed on them, by the author attention to his conversation. Some of his of an Essay on the revival of the drama in opinions and remarks, which had impressed Italy, note 8, p. 270; is only justice to their themselves deeply upon his memory, be used merit. - As you like it," was prepared for the to take pleasure in repeating. Revering press upon the same plan, but it sleeps with Tillotson, he was surprised to hear the doctor the editor, có whoni we shall now return. cali him “a pitiful fellow." But he was His person was tall, well proportioned, and still more astonished to hear him acknow- majestic. His countenance beamed benevoledge, “long aiter be had been employed lence. His manners were soft, easy, and in preparing his Shakespeare for the public polite. His mind was richly stored with eve, indeed a very short time before it issued classic lore, and every moral virtue. His from the prese, that he had never yet read conversation was a stream of elegant intorthe plays of Beaumont and Fletcher," Pre- macion, uccasionally enriched with just critte tace to the plays, Lear and Cymbeline, Dub. cism and solid argument. Graced with every 1793. During his residence in London, the accomplishment himself, his family becanic theatre engaged much of his attention, and highly accomplished under his direction. Of his passion for that elegant amusement grew the fine arts, music, (which he has so ably dewith his years." He followed the best per findet in a note on the Merchant of Venice, formers from theatre to the stre, and studied p. 236-239, was his favourite. Accordingly the best dramatic writers. From an admirer it was particularly cultivated in his family, he became a cricic. ldolisiog Shakespeare, who seems to inherit not only his accomhe olten lamented 'hat his dra nas had sus plishments, but his virtues. To this slight fered in their structure, from the ignorance sketch of his character, we shall only add, or careiesness of the first eritors. This de- that he closed an useful life at an advanced tertind hoi to at:empt a transposition of age, at his beautiful seat of Cronroe, where the scenes, io a few places, from the order he had long resided in elegant hospitality, in which they have been handed down by ministering to the comforts of his surrounding successive edicions. “This," he con inues tenantry, ad exhibi'ing in his public and in the modest preface to bis edirion of Lear, private conduct, in his studies and in his “ wil doubtless be thought by many a harcy amusements, a model wortby the imitation innovation, but it it be considered in what a of every country gentleman. cisorderly and neglected state this author's At Philadelphia, on the 9th of February pieces are reported to have been left by him, last, and about 86 years, James Pemberton, and how litile certainty there is that the

esç. of the society called Quakers; by which,

e slenes have hitherto preserved their originalno

no less than by the community at large, he arrangement; the presumption with which

was eminently distinguished for the upright this attempt is chargeable, will admit of discharic of his rcligious and civil duties. much extenuation, and it were, at least, 10 He was long the colleague of Dr. Benjamin be wisted that no privilege of alteration Franklin, in representing that (his native) inore injurious to Shakespeare, had ever been city, in the general legislature or Penosylassumed by any of his cditors." What be

vania, pievious to the revolution; and after attempted, he has accomplished with great

it, he succeeded the philosopher as president ingenuity and much taste in his editions of

of the socicty, instituted for promoting the the hollowing plays :--Lear and Cymbeline,

so 'interests of the enslaved Africans; which, Dub. 1793, and the Merchant of Venice,

with various other benevolent objecte, enDub. 1805. To each play he has assigned

gayed a large propos tion of his time more a separate volume, containing, not only notes Thin lait

than half a century. On the 13th, at the and illustraticns of various commentators, interment of his remains, the respect felt for with remarks by the coitor, but the several

his memory was manifested by a very numecr tical and historical essays that have sp.

rous attendance of his fellow.citizens, of all peared at ditierent times, respecting each

ranks and denominations. His temperature, piece. lo Cymueline he ha, added a new

and regular habits, contributed to preserve, traslacion of like ninch story of Second Day

almost to the last, the unimpaired enjoyment of the Decemerone, and an original air, which

of his intellectual faculties, with a capacity accompanies the words ut the elegy on Fiu

for exerting them; and Iris closing moments dele's ueath, compcsed on purpose for his

evinced the peaceful retrospect of a well. pu lication, ay Sig. Giordani. These editions

spent life. Mark the perfect man, and will yet be considered as a valuable accession

behold the upright; for the end of that man to the critical labours of the commentators of

is peace." our immurtal bard. According as they are

On board his Majesty's Ship Wanderer, in better known, they will rise in estination the West Indies, in the 1st year of his

agr, Lieutenant William White, of the an inic w D1C.1.0118 ppeartu liituny.

royal navy, cldest son of A. W. White, csq. mously. They were published in London by Lackiogion and Alles, and Longman and

of Surinam,

of Rees. MONTHLY MAG. No. 186.

4 P . PRICES PRICES OF STOCKS, from the 26th of MAY, to the 21th of Juxs, both inclusive.

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