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GEORGE W. CHILDS, PUBLISHER, Nos. 628 & 630 CHESTNUT STREET, PHILADELPHIA.

PHILADELPHIA, NOVEMBER 1, 1866.

CONTENTS.
TESTIMONIAL DINNER TO W. HEPWORTH DIXON, Esq.. ............
OUR CONTINENTAL CORRESPONDENCE....
NOTES ON BOOKS AND BOOKSELLERS ............
OBITUARY ........
PERIODICALS .....

...........................
BOOK NOTICES ............
ANNOUNCEMENTS ...
BOOKS WANTED ........

................................. 13
LIST OF BOOKS RECENTLY PUBLISHED IN THE UNITED STATES 19
WORKS RECENTLY PUBLISHED IN GREAT BRITAIN ................ 15

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LIST OF ADVERTISERS. . 28 Gould & Lincoln ......

....... 31 Sampson, Low, Son & Marston ............. Groombridge & Sons......

Scribner, Welford & Co.......
Huntington, F.J. & Co. .....

Sheldon & Co. ..............
Johnston, Robert H. & Co.....

Skelly, J. P. & Co. ....
Judd, Orange & Co....

Steiger, E. ...........
Lee & Shepard ......

29, 36 Stevens Brothers.....
Lippincott, J. B. & Co.... ................ 20, 21 " The Bookseller" ....
Little, Brown & Co........

Tieknor & Fields .......
Moore & Nima...............

Townsend, W. A. ......
Nelson, Thomas & Sons .....

Trubner & Co. ........
New York Bible Society........

Van Eyrie, Horton & Co..
Potter, John E. & Co. ...............

Virtue & Yorston
40 Presbyterian Board of Publication ........... 40 Whitney, H. M........

| Presbyterian Publication Committee....... Wiley, John & Son.........
38 Reinwald, Charles .

Willmer & Rogers .......

....... 27 37 Roberts Brothers....

Woodward, Geo. E. & F. W... 35 Routledge, George & Sons....

Allen, Edy. G...
American Sunday School Union
Appleton, D. & Co.....
Appleton, Wm. H. .....
Bangs, Merwin & Co.....
Barnes, A, S. & Co..
Blelock & Co.........
Broughton, N. Jr. .....
Broughton & Wyman .....
Barke, J. W. & Co........
Carleton .................
Carter, Robert & Brothers ......
Cassell, Petter & Galpin......
Draper & Halliday .......
Datton, E. P. & Co........
Eyre & Spottiswoodle....
Garrigues, J. C. & Co...

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RATES OF ADVERTISING.
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AGENTS IN EUROPE AND ELSEWHERE. TRUBNER & 00., 60 Paternoster Row, London. 1 GUSTAVE BOSSANGE & CO., 25 Quai Voltaire, Paris F. A. BROCKHAUS, Leipsic.

CHARLES MUQUARDT, Brussels.
FREDERIC MÜLLER, Amsterdam.

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GEO. N. DAVIS, 119 Rua Direita, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Agent for South America.
A. ROMAN, San Francisco, California, Agent for the Pacific Coast.

STEPHENS & CO., 10 Calle Mercaderes, Habana, Agents for the West Indies.
Subscriptions or Advertisements for the "American Literary Gazetteroill be received by the above Agents, and they will forward

to the Editor any Books or Publications intended for notice.

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TESTIMONIAL DINNER

great success, and must form a most agreeable point

of remembrance through Mr. Dixon's future life. TO W. HEPWORTH DIXON, ESQ.

For the information of our readers, we will here On Tuesday, October 23d, a testimonial dinner annex a few personal memoranda relative to Mr. was given, at the Continental Hotel, Philadelphia, to Dixon. This gentleman was born on the last day W. #1. Dixon, Esq., editor of the "Athenæum," the of June, 1821, at Holmferth, Yorkshire, England. leading weekly critical journal of England, by some His first essay in letters was a five-act tragedy. members of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, He became literary editor of a paper in Cheltenham, and other leading citizens. This was a compliment also contributing to the London periodicals. He well merited, for its recipient had “done the State removed to London at the age of 25, and wrote a some service," by vindicating the personal charac- series of papers in the “Daily News" on the Literater of William Penn from the aspersions cast upon ture of the Lower Orders, and another upon London it by Lord Macaulay in his “ History of England" — Prisons. In 1849, he brought out “ John Howard, aspersions repeated, with a show of elaborate argu- a Memoir," written many years before-a work for ment, in an appendix to the second volume of which he could scarcely find a publisher, but which the work, finally revised by the author in 1857, went through three editions in twelve months. In eight years after the attack had first been made. 1850 he was appointed a Commissioner for organIn 1851, which was as early as possible under the izing the World's Fair of 1851; and in the latter circumstance that Mr. Dixon had to obtain much of year appeared his “ William Penn, a Biography." his materials from this city, his “William Penn, a At this time, he was much engaged on the "AtheHistorical Biography'' was published, with a special næum”-its working editor, in fact, Mr. T. K. Herchapter, successfully defending the great founder vey's health having latterly incapacitated him from of Pennsylvania. For this voluntary service, solely sustained labor; and in 1853, on Mr. Hervey's reprompted by his sense of right and justice, Mr. tirement, Mr. Dixon was constituted sole and reDixon was gratefully elected honorary member of sponsible editor-a post which he has continued to the Historical Society, and the Testimonial Banquet occupy to the satisfaction of the public and his might be considered his inauguration festival. Mr. own credit. In 1852, was published his “ Robert Dixon has travelled extensively throughout this Blake ; Admiral and General at Sea." In 1861, he country during the last few months, and is said to published his - Personal History of Lord Bacon ; be again engaged upon a biography of a great man from Unpublished Papers"-a work which has been whose career is connected with its early history, reprinted in America and Germany, and is being the gallant but unfortunate Sir Walter Raleigh. translated by M. Louis Blanc for publication in During the whole period of our late unhappy civil France. In conjunction with Miss Jewsbury, he war, the “ Athenæum,"in his hands, consistently ex- wrote “Memoirs of Lady Morgan,” whose literary pressed its sympathy for the good cause of freedom. executor he was. He has travelled largely through

The banquet, superb in all respects, was partaken out Europe, and his latest work describes the Holy of by Mr. Dixon and some forty-five other gentle- Land as he observed it. Mr. Dixon is a barristermen-representing the commerce, law, and litera- at-law, having been “called" by the benchers of the ture of Philadelphia. Merchants and professional Inner Temple. In all respects he is a gentleman of men, newspaper proprietors and poets, publishers high character, personal and literary. and historians, uovelists and critics, distinguished

R. S. M. soldiers and acute gentlemen of the long robe, bankers and engineers, were here assembled-a body of

OUR CONTINENTAL CORRESPONDENCE. whom any city might well be proud, discharging,

Paris, August SI, 1866. with splendid hospitality, a public debt of gratitude The city of Paris has purchased the Hotel Carto a foreign writer who had vindicated, without fee navalet, giving 950,000 francs for it. We may soon or reward, without prompting or solicitation, the hope to see the Municipal Library established honor of the illustrious dead.

there. The city has published the first volume of Hon. Morton McMicbael, Mayor of Philadelphia, its history (an interesting volume it is), and it is occupied the chair, with Mr. John William Wallace, said to be in treaty with Prince Czartoryski for his now reporter of the Supreme Court of the United mansion, Hotel Lambert, where the Municipal HisStates, also a member of the Historical Society, as torical Museum will be placed. Do you know the vice-chairman. Without any preliminary toasts, meaning of hotel? Here, town mansions belonging the health of Mr. Dixon was proposed by the Chair: to one family (a common sight in old times, quite man, soon after the banquet had been done justice rare pow) are called hotels ; the city mansion, or, to. Always eloquent, the Chairman was more than as it is called by a pleonasm in London, the Manusually so on this occasion. His speech, brilliant sion House, is here called the Hotel de Ville. and earnest, kept the attention of its auditors upon Taverns are called Grands Hotels, grand meaning the qui vive from the opening to the closing sen- public. Respectable detached country-houses are tence. The toast was lionored with great cordiality, called chateaux. I make this explanation that yon and suitably acknowledged by Mr. Dixon, who paid may not think Hotel Carnavalet an old tavern. 16 a hearty tribute to the memory of William Penn. is No. 23 Rue Culture Ste. Catherine. It was bnilt At the request of the Chair, Mr. J. W. Wallace read, in 1548 by Pierre Lescot, Abbé de Clagny, and Jean and presented to Mr. Dixon, a series of resolutions Bullant, for the Sire des Ligneris. This family expressive of welcome, regard, and gratitude, which owned it only thirty years. It was bought by the the Historical Society had unanimously voted to de Carnavalet family in 1578. Androuet du Cerhim, and was followed, in an able speech, by Mr. I ceau (the architect of Pont Neuf), Jean Goujon, Horatio Gates Jones, one of the Vice Presidents of François Mansard, and Van Obstal adorned it. It the Society. Other speakers, during the evening, was reckoned the noblest mansion in Paris. Mme. were General Meade, Judge Hare, Messrs. Bayard de Sevigné bought it and inhabited it in October, Taylor, George H. Boker, Gillingham Fell, John Jay 1677, and there this immortal writer died the 14th Smith, Joseph Harrison, Jr., Daniel Dougherty, Dr. January, 1696. At her death it was purchased by S. A. Allibone, and Dr. Shelton Mackenzie. An Paul Estienne Brunet de Rancy, a former general. agreeable interlude was the recitation, by Dr. Ben- After the Revolution, the family de Pommereul jamin Coates, of an excellent Ode to the Defender bought it ; then it became the Government Books' of Penn. In all respects, this entertainment was a Censors' office; next the Government Engineering

NOV. 1, 1866.

School ; and lastly a boarding school. Would it expressed for some phases of his talents allows me not seem, from this enumeration of its tenants, as to express' myself with this liberty. Add to all this if Mme. de Sevigné's ghost attracted books and an attire which was nearly always irreproachable their lovers to the house! Her letters show she (he must have taken at least three hours to dress, spent many happy days here. There are a great or to have himself dressed), a plain, round handmany objects connected with Mme. de Sevigné still writing, rapid and elegant, without any of those in existence. The Chateau des Rochers, near Di- tremulous lines which lead one to suspect fondness nan, from which many of her letters are dated, is for drink, love of chess, and passionate fondness especially wealthy in these souvenirs. It is won- for legerdemain, and you will have before you that derful how little is lost. I saw a few days since on enigmatic, puzzling, inexplicable, coldly odd, rethe walls a placard announcing the sale of 6000 pulsive person who bore the sympathetic and justly addresses of newspapers, the cover bearing the loved name Alfred de Musset. There evidently name of the subscriber, and among them were were two beings in him. The being who held the newspaper addresses of the sixteenth century, and pen was the best, the true, the real man. Let us from this distant period of time to yesterday, forget the other. Let us abandon that passion Nothing seems lost in this world but inan's life. which makes us ask from artists a certain cordial'Tis the only brittle thing on earth.

| ity. Let us take them, not for what they are, but I regret to record the death of Judge Warn Koe- for what they are so good as to give us. Their esnig, one of the most eminent judicial writers of sences are mysterious. And, to sum up my thought Germany. He died at Stuttgardt in the 720 year in ove sentence, it is always prudent to distrust of his age. . . We have lost, too, M. Roger de Beau-them." Foir, who was for a great many years the “fast M. de la Pilorgerie has discovered in the Library man" of Paris, and whose various adventures filled of Nantes the first French newspapers printed, and the public ear for many years. His early and pro- he has republished them. During the expedition longed dissipations gave him gout, rheumatism, and of Charles VIII, to the kingdom of Naples (1494), softening of the spinal marrow. These diseases hawkers cried in the streets of Paris, the “Bulletin have for years made him bedridden, or, even worse, of the Grand Army of Italy." While this word chair-ridden. It has been five years since he quit-“grand” is under my pen, let me regret translators ted his chair; whenever he attempted to lie on his do not render it by the proper English word, main bed, he would suffocate. His name was Roger de army, instead of giving it grand army. ... It is Bully. When it was evident he was about to be- stated the French Emperor will turn his attention to, come notorious as the wildest fellow in Paris, one indeed has already begun to collect materials for, of his uncles made him change his name. Wild a life of Charlemagne. He will probably do Phias was the life led by M. Roger de Beauvoir, he lippe Augustus, Louis XI., and Louis XIV.'s life, found time to write forty works-novels, plays, and each after the other. ... It is said M. Louis Paris poems. His best work was his first novel, “ L'Ecolier is about publishing a work on French antiquities in de Cluny," which was published in 1832; the next 10 vols. 8vo. . . . M. Guérin and other lovers of in value were “Histoires Cavalières," Le “Caba- the fine arts are about to publish engravings of all ret des Morts," "Le Chevalier de St. Georges," and the valuable objects in the Napoleon III. Museum “L'Hotel Fimodan.” Messrs. Michel Levy still have (ex-Campana Collection). . . . M. Lafferrière, the them on their catalogue. He dramatized with actor, apnonnces that bis memoirs will positively be M. Melesville “Le Chevalier de St. Georges," and published this winter. . . . It is said the French the play had an extraordinary run, M. Melesville government has requested Dr. Veron to disconwas once asked what was M. Roger de Beauvoir's tinue publishing his memoirs. . . . M. Champfleury share in this play. He replied: “ He lent me a has begun to publish extracts from his memoirs. hunting-knife for one of the characters.” M. Meles-... An article by M. Rénan on St. Francis of Assaz, ville was unjust, for his color-bearer did unques-published in the 'Journal des Débats," has attracted tionably furnish the idea and the plot of the play. a great deal of attention. It reveals his antipathy M. Roger de Beauvoir wrote with M. Lambert Thi-to material progress and to freedom. It shows he boust another very successful play, “ Les Enfers de regards convents as favorable to great works (a faParis.” He was happy at impromptu poetry. He vorite thesis with him), and raises our smiles to see married Mlle. Doze, the favorite pupil of Mlle. Mars, his unequal standards of measuring truth. He after living irregularly with her. The marriage alleges the stigmata on the saint's body to have was singularly unfortunate, and the quarrels of been frauds, and in the same breath admits the husband and wife filled our public prints and courts saint's song as unquestionably authentic, although of justice with their scandals. He was extremely the Italian original has been lost. The article is very popular, and his funeral was attended by the ma- curious. ... The Minister of Public Instruction jority of second-rate literary men in Paris. His has offered prizes for the best papers on archæwife died some years since in extreme poverty, and ology published in the memoirs of provincial was buried at the expense of Prince Napoleon. learned societies ; for the best glossary of the dia.

Since I am with the dead, let me translate a pen- lect of any given district of France; and for the and-ink portrait of Alfred de Musset by M. Charles best memoir on the commerce and industry of any Monselet: “I was able to approach Alfred de Mus- province or town during the Middle Ages. set frequently, to be introduced to him, and to talk M. l'révost-Paradol's forthcoming book will be with him. His appearance was icy, rather indiffe- entitled “Democracy and Liberty." . . . MM. Lurent than haughty; his movements were slow as cien Biart and Ernest Daudet are writing, under the those of an automaton ; his eye was without pro- patronage of the French government, a diplomatic jection ; his articulation was difficult; and his con- and military history of the French expedition to versation was empty, terribly empty! It seemed as if Mexico. ... M. Dentu, the well-known pamphlet he was fulfilling the conditions of a wager, as if he publisher of the Palais Royal, has taken the conwas trying to play a joke upon his company. Never-tract of the publication of the catalogue of the theless, I saw him with his best friends, witli Arsène Universal Exhibition; he gives $100,000 for the Houssaye, Capt. d'Arpentigny, and with other per- monopoly. He reckons upon making at least sons whom he could not possibly consider Philistines $40,000 by it. He reckons upon a sale of 1,000,000 or indiscreet visitors. Alfred de Musset was the most copies at 20 cents (at the least); the cost of uninteresting of men. The admiration I have always printing, paper, etc. will be $60,000; add $100,000. NOV. 1, 1866. He sells $200,000 worth, and pockets $40,000. ... logues is full of interest and importance. More It is said the French Comedy is about to play attention should be paid to it, and the publisher an unpublished piece by Beaumarchais. This ru- who makes his catalogue bibliographic, artistic, and mor has been repeatedly current the last few years. easy of reference will find it a practical benefit. . . . Alfred de Musset confessed, some years ago, to ed de Musset contessed, some years ago O

I

In the "London Athenæum” of October 6 is a a friend, he took the idea of his exquisite play "Le

communication in four columns, from Mr. Heury Caprice from Crebillon the younger's “Les Hasards du Coin du Feu.” ... The Perpetual Secretary of

Stevens, criticizing most fiercely the “ Bibliotheca

Americana Vetustissima,” recently published in the Academy of Inscriptions and Belles Lettres has

New York. It is admitted in general terms that made his annual report on that learned society's publications. He says the third volume of the col

| “ the book at bottom is not a bad one;" yet parts lection of the “ Western Historians of the Crusades"

of it are vehemently attacked, and various alleged will soon be published; the first volume of the Ori

blunders pointed out. ental historians (Arabians) will be published before GERMAN PerioDICALS.-Mr. Steiger, of New York, the end of the year. The introduction will be ex- has issued a copious catalogue, pot paged, of the tremely valuable. He hopes the first volume of the periodical literature of Germany, in all its departArmenian historians will also appear before the ments. The contents are classified under twentyyear's end. The volume containing the Greek seven heads, embracing theology, philosophy, medihistorians is in press. The 23d vol. of the “Histo- cine, fine arts, technology, physics, gympastics, rians of France" will be sent to press towards the politics, free-masonry, and we believe everything close of the year. The Collection of MSS. Charters else. It is a priced list, and Mr. Steiger is ready and Diplomas relating to French history is still in to supply the works to subscribers. preparation; no date is mentioned for its publica- ! TAR AMERICAN LAW REVIEW.-An examination of tion. The eighth and last volume of the “Chronological Table of Printed Diplomas and Acts” ad.

the first number of this new quarterly induces us vances slowly. The 16th vol. of “Gallia Christiana”

; to believe that it will be a valuable addition to our will be published before October. The 25th vol. of

legal literature. Such a publication has long been the “Literary History of France” will soon be pub

needed. The legal profession--large, important, and lished. The 21st vol. of “Notices and Extracts from

influential as it is in the country-has no periodical MSS.” will ere long appear, with the “Greek Papy-|

which represents its literature. We have had rus of Egypt,” and a translation of Ibn Khaldoun's

monthly law magazines, but they mainly consisted “Introduction”; while the 22d vol. of the same col

of judicial opinions and scissors-work. We need lection, containing extracts and notices of French

something of an original character. The new Regrammarians of the Middle Ages, is in press. The

view is carefully made up, and will be acceptable to 26th vol. of the " Memoirs of the Academy is in the legal scholar and valuable to the mere practipress; and two vols. of “Memoirs of Learned Men,

tioner. There are, however, three errors to be not Members of the Academy,” are likewise in

avoided : Politics must be carefully eschewed; it press.

G.S.

must not be local; and it must not appear to be

simply an instrument to further the law-book NOTES ON BOOKS AND BOOKSELLERS.

business of the publishers. We have looked A TASTEFUL CATALOGUE.—The time will soon come

through the first number with reference to each of when the trade will pay much more attention to the

these three particulars, and are pleased to see that preparation and printing of catalogues than is now

there is little or no ground for criticism on that score. done. One can almost always judge of the taste or COPYRIGHT AND CHEAPNESS.-Mr. Anthony Trolknowledge of a publisher by the general style of lope has read a paper in England, before the Social his catalogue. If it be slovenly, or marred by ty- Science Association, on the subject of International pographical errors, we may fear that his other pub- Copyright. It contains nothing very new, and the lications will be equally objectionable. If, on the old ideas are not expressed in a very striking manother hand, it be neat and tasteful, we have some ner. He says that he has found the publishers of assurance that the work on his general issues will this country favorable to an international system of be marked by the same excellent qualities. This copyright, but that the difficulty is with Congressis corroborated by a catalogue, recently received, of a body which is not disposed just now to favor Engthe publications of De Vries, Ibarra & Co., of Bos- lish interests. At the same time we see that some ton. In arrangement, display, and choice of type, of our newspapers are asserting that English it is excellent. Specimen cuts are furnished from books are put into the market here at prices the illustrated works, and head-pieces and tail- which compete with the American reprints. If pieces are thrown in to give effect to the page. In present high prices are not reduced, and the burdens some instances the covers of the books in paper are upon the publishing interest removed, this will soon reproduced, and if to this a specimen of the printed be, if it is not now. the case, and an international page were added, the catalogue could be made to copyright may thus become practically of greatly exhibit the appearance of the work. We are also diminished importance to English authors. As furnished with an alphabetical index of authors, illustrations of the low rate at which books are now referring to the pages of the catalogue. Another very manufactured in England, we may mention that great merit by which it is characterized is the size, Mr. Tegg has issued an abridgment “ Walker and in which respect it has been made to conform to Webster combined in a Dictionary of the English the “ AMERICAN LITERARY GAZETTE AND PUBLISHERS' Language," for one shilling. It contains 428 pages, CIRCULAR.” While we have strenuously urged the and is quite legibly printed. Messrs. Black, of Ed. adoption of a uniform size, we have not sought to inburgh, and Mr. Hotten, of London, each announce recommend that of our own periodical. Still it is the Waverley novels at sixpence a copy ; and the a size which possesses advantages, for it admits of latter gentleman has completed arrangements for the employment of cuts and blocks of large size, issuing, at an early date, the complete works of and of ample typographical display, with quite as Shakspeare for one shilling. It is to be edited by much effect as a full quarto page, while it is much Mr. Halliwell, and will contain the more important more conveniently bandled and bound. We trust emendations of Dyce, Collier, and Staunton. To the good example of De Vries, Ibarra & Co. will insure typographical accuracy, each word is to be not be lost on others. In fact the subject of Cata- checked off by five different readers.

NOV. 1, 1866.

The forthcoming “Variorum Leonora" of our friend sire to expatriate himself permanently from “dear Mr. Lukens is well characterized by the following old England," but it seems to us he would not be letter:

altogether unwilling to spend a year or two amongst

“Phils., Oct. 27, 1866. us, should business considerations make it advisa“MY DEAR SIR: It is good news that you are about ble for him to do so. We can promise him that we publishing that monograph, so to say, of Bürger's would not deteriorate upon a closer acquaintance. Lenore, with variorum translations, on which you Among other literary enterprises, James Hogg & have been so long engaged ; and so successfully, that Sons will be known in this country as having one knows not which to admire most, your perse- carried successfully through the press the collected vering industry, or your literary taste. On no ac- edition of Thomas de Quincey's Writings, under the count omit to publish both of your own translations; careful revision of the English opium-eater himfirst, because you profess to give all that you have self. The “old man eloquent" had just about collected ; and, next, because for accuracy and spirit completed his task of revising for the press the fourthey will bear comparison with any that exist. teenth volume of his Works, when he died, a few

"Yours truly, R. SHELTON MACKENZIE. years ago, and Messrs. Hogg have since sold the "C. J. LUKENS, Esq."

copyrights, &c. to Messrs. A. & C. Black, of EdinBangs, MERWIN & Co., New York, offer for sale on burgh. Messrs. James Hogg & Sons are the publishthe 13th inst. a large collection of popular and stand- ers of that deservedly popular magazine “ London ard books, appropriate to the fall and holiday season. Society," which, next to the “Cornhill,” is said to They will also sell, at the same time, valuable stereo- have the largest circulation of any shilling illustype plates formerly published by Carey & Hart, of trated magazine published in the Old Country. We this city, including Lord Bacon's Works; Prose Wri-predict a good sale for “ London Society" in this ters of America, by Griswold ; Butler's Sermons ; country as the work becomes better known, as it is, Butler's Philosophy; Reed's English History; Reed's par excellence, a magazine well suited to the tastes British Poets ; Mrs. Sigourney's Poems, &c. of the majority of the American reading public.

W. HEPWORTH Dixon, Esq., has been spending Its attractive, highly-finished wood engravings, from some days in Philadelphia as the guest of his friend designs by the leading English artists, and piquant J. B. Lippincott, Esq., the well-known publisher tales and sketches, cannot fail to make its gaily

colored wrappers a welcome visitor alongside of “ CHRISTIAN SOCIETY."—We called attention, in “Harper" or "Godey." We have seen the design our issue of September 15, to this new English

for the next Christmas No. (extra), which is as monthly magazine of Religious Literature, Informa- bright and seasonable as ever. When we mention tion, and Biography, and are now able to place be- among the authors and artists such names as Mark fore our readers the contents of the first No., which Lemon. George Thomas. Mary Howitt. Tom Hood. seem indicative of popularity for this new venture : Charles Keene, J. D. Watson, McConnell, “LamFirst Words; The Religious Use of Travel; In the beth Casual,” the bill of fare will be seen to be an Country on an Autumn Sunday; Evenings with

attractive one. Those of the trade who are not at Friends and Books, a Discussion on the Religious

present familiar with this magazine will do well to Literature of the Month; Christian Hospitality ; l order a specimen copy from their New York agents. Salome's Prayer; Curiosities of lymnology ; Chris- James Hogg & Sons also publish an extensive Catatian Society of Old England; True Site of the Holy | logue of Popular Illustrated Juvenile Books, which Sepulchre ; People called Christians ; The Pagan Messrs. J. B. Lippincott & Co., of this city, can supChrist; Phenomena of Modern Religious Life. As ply, and for a list of which we refer our readers to to the aim of this new magazine, we cannot do better our advertising columns. We are glad we have than refer our readers to the written prospectus met Mr. John Hogg, that his visit to this country which appears elsewhere in our present issue, and has been so agreeable, and hope that we may soon where the scope is very clearly defined. Many of see him again the best English writers who can give cheerful Religious Literature, and who are known by their

A New Novel BY MARION HARLAND.—The pume

rous readers and admirers of Marion Harland's books and by their contributions in such serials as “Good Words," &c., are associated with “Christian

Works will be gratified to receive a new work from

her pen. It is entitled “Sunnybank," and is her Society.'

first continuous story since “Miriam,” which was We have had the pleasure of making the acquaint

published in the fall of 1862. Her later volumes ance of another of our publishing friends from across

s have been composed of briefer tales and sketches. the Atlantic, Mr. John Hogg (of the firm of James The

ntic, Mr. John Hogg (of the firm. of James The first book published by Marion Harland, and Hogg & Sons, London), who has been in this country which at once admitted her to a place among the for a month or two, combining business with plea- most able and successful novelists of our country. sure. He has not been satished with spending his was " Alone." Within a few months of its publicatime in the large eastern cities, but has made a tour tion it reached a sale almost unprecedented by west and south to some of our young but active and

e and any American book. “Sunny bank” will be pubrapidly increasing business resorts. When a man lished by Sheldon & Co., New York, who have now has visited, as we understand Mr. Hogg has, twelve read

ready new editions of her other works. of our principal States in the Union, he carries home with him a better idea of the wealth and resources

COLONEL Badeau has in preparation for the press of this country than years of reading would afford. I a “ History of General Ulysses S. Grant, and His and the more of such visits we have from our in- Relations to the War of the Union.” This will untelligent friends across the Atlantic, the better for doubtedly be a correct and authentic history of our the peace and harmony of both countries. Mr. Hogg “greatest general." The author, being aide-despeaks highly of most that he has seen, and is camp to General Grant, will have unusual facilities especially gratified with the uniform courtesy and for obtaining reliable information of the movements kindness which he has met with here among all of our armies, and the final overthrow of the Rebelclasses of society-whether in the drawing-rooi of lion. It will be published by D. Appleton & Co. the “upper ten," or on board a Mississippi steamer;! McPherson's POLITICAL MANUAL for 1866 has sold and says he will always retain a kind and pleasant to the extent of 20,000 copies since the middle of recollection of his pleasant intercourse with his July. This is about the heaviest single book sale " American Cousin." It is not likely he would de- in that time which has recently occurred.

TUT

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