Sidor som bilder
PDF
ePub

PAGB

PAGB The Kansas-Nebraska bill passes the House. Yeas 118, Nays, 10", thereon.

85 TYLER, JOHN, of Virginia, nominated and

86 The clause of said bill repealing the Missouri

defeated for Vice-President, 1885-6.

12 Compromise ; President Pierce on Kansas Ar

Nominated for Vice-President, at Harrisburg, fairs in '55–6; dr. Douglas's Report on do.,

1839, and elected in 1840.

12 March 12, '56

S7 Two-THIRDS Role adopted by first Demo. Minority Report of Mr. Collamer of Vermont... 89

cratic Convention, 1882

10 Vouse orders an investigation of Kansas frauds;

Report of Messrs. Howard and Sherman tiere. Toccer Isaac, of Connecticut, supported on

92

for President by Democratic National Convention. 41 House votes to admit Kansas as a Free State... 107 Mr. Douglas reports a bill to pacify Kansas, 17 Van Buren, Martin, of New York, nomi. Mr. Trunibull's amendments thereto; Do. Messrs.

nated for Vice-President. Foster's, Wilson's and Seward's; Passage of

10 Douglas's bill..

Nominated for President in 1885, and elected in 10S

1886 Mr. Gito. G. Dunn's bill to reorganize Kansas..

12 199 Nominated for reëlection as President, 1840

18 President Pierce's last Message on Kansas.. 110

Defeated for President in 1840.

18 Remarks of Messrs. Hale, Seward, Mason, Wil

Defeated in Democratic National Convention, son and Pugh thereon.

112

1814 President Buchanan on the Lecompton Constitu

18

Nominated for President by Buffalo Convention, tion...

113
1845

17 Mr. Douglas's speech against Lecompton.

114 Action on Lecompton in Kansas.

On Slavery in the Territories, letter to Water

116 Mr. Buchanan's special Lecompton Message..

bury and others....

181 117 Provisions of Lecompton Constitution respecting

Vote IX

WHIG Natinal Convention, Slavery..

120 1852, on Resolve approving Compromise Measures The Lecompton bill; Passed in the Senate, but

of 1850....

19 defeated in the House ; The Crittenden-Montgomery substitute..

121

WARD, John E., of Georgia, President of Yeas and Nays on adopting substituie..

122

the Democratic National Convention, 1856........ 24 Senate refuses to concur; Mr. English moves a Conference Committee ; Carried by the Speak

WEBSTER, DANIEL, of Massachusetts, super's casting vote; The English Compromise

ported by Massachusetts for President, 1836.. 12 bill..

Defeated for President in Whig Convention, 1843 15

123 Carried through both Houses; The Wyandot

Beaten for President in Whig Convention, 1852.. 18 Convention and Constitution.

Memorial to Congress for Slavery Restriction 125

59 Mr. Grow proposes, and the House votes to ad.

His view on the powers of Supreme Court.. 177 mit Kansas under the Wyandot Constitution;

Speech against Slavery Extension.

202 Senate refuses to act on the bill......... 126 WELLER, Col. JOHN B., of California,

beaten for Vice-President in Democratic National SLAVE-TRADE ADVOCATED in Democratic

Convention, 1852.

20 National Convention by Mr. Gaulden, of Georgia. 89 Also by Governor Adams, of S. C., in Message to

Whic NationAL CONVENTIONS, held at Har. Legislature 208 risburg, Penn., 1839

12 Held at Baltimore, Md., 1844

18 SPENCER, AMBROSE, of New-York, Presi.

Held at Philadelphia, Penn., 1848.

15 dent Whig National Convention, 1844 13 Held at Baltimore, Md., 1852

18 Held at Baltimore, Md., 1856

25 SPENCER, JOAN C., of New-York, President Anti-Masonic National Convention

WHITE, Hugh L., of Tennessee, unsuccess. 10 ful candidate for President

12 STEVENSON, ANDREW, of Virginia, Presi. dent Second Democratic National Convention.....

Wilmot, David, of Pennsylvania, defeated

12 Ditto, President National Democratic Conven

for Vice-President in Republican Convention, 1856 22 tion, 1848..

16

Temporary Chairman of Republican National
Convention, 1860.....

26 STRANGE, ROBERT, of North Carolina, beaten for Vice-President in Democratic Convention,

Wilson, Gen. HENRY, of Massachusetts, 1852

President of Free Democratic National Conyen20 tion, 1852

21 SUMNER, CHARLES, of Massachusetts, de. feated for Vice-President in Republican National

WIRT, WILLIAM, of Maryland, Anti-MaConvention, 1856.......

sonic candidate for President, 1832 22

10 SUPREME COURT, POWER AND DUTIES OF

Wilkins, WILLIAM, of Pennsylvania, supOpinions of Thomas Jefferson..

174

ported by Pennsylvania for Vice-President, 1882.. 11 Opinions of John Taylor of Caroline, Va., John Wisconsin declares for Free Territory, Randolph of Roanoke, Nathaniel Macon of

through Legislative Resolves......

203 N. C., and John Bacon, of Massachusetts 175 Opinions of John J. Crittenden, Nathaniel Macon,

WOODBURY, LEVI, of New-Harapshire, beaten James Barbour, Supreme Court of Georgia,

for President in Democratic Convention, 1843 .... 16 Legislature of Georgia, Supreme Court of Pennsylvania, and Court of Appeals of Virginia.... 176

WRIGHT, Silas, of New York, nominated Opinions of Mahlon Dickerson, Richard M. John

for Vice-President by Democratic National ConBOA, Gen. Andrew Jackson, and Daniel Web

vention of 1844, but declined... ster...

177 YANCEY, William L., of Alabama, offers TAYLOR RATIFICATION MEETING at Phila

a "non-interference" resolve in Democratic Con. delphia, 1848, and Resolves 15

17 vention, 1848. He advocates Revolution in the South.

178 TAYLOR, ZACHARY, of Louisiana, Whig nominee for President, 1848

15

Young, Col. Samuel, of New-York, Presi. Elected President in 1848.

16

dent of the Barnburners' Convention at Utica in 1848.

17 TILDEN, DANIEL R., of Obio,

proposes

Offers Anti-Slavery Resolves in Senate of New. Slavery Restriction in Whig Convention, 1843 15 York

206

13

APPENDIX.

283

RESOLUTIONS of '98 and '99, (Va. & Ky.) 249 | The DRED Scott DECISION....
DOUGLAS' OPINIONS ON SLAVERY in the SLAVERY IN NEW MEXICO, with the action
Territories, Wilmot Proviso, &c,........

251 of Congress thereon...........

83

A POLITICAL TEXT-BOOK FOR 1860.

NATIONAL CAUCUSES, CONVENTIONS, AND

PLATFORMS.

caucuses.

National Conventions for the nomination of a potent influence over such questions, being, candidates are of comparatively recent origin. on this occasion, unable to agree as to which of in the earlier political history of the United her favored sons should have the preference. States, under the Federal Constitution, candi. Ninety-four of the 136 Republican members of dates for President and Vice-President were Congress attended this caucus, and declared nominated by congressional and legislative their preference of Mr. Madison, who received

Washington was elected as first 83 votes, the remaining 11 being divided bePresident under the Constitution, and reëlected tween Mr. Monroe and George Clinton. The for a second term by a unanimous, or nearly Opposition supported Mr. Pinckney; but Mr. unanimous, concurrence of the American people; Madison was elected by a large majority. but an opposition party gradually grew up in Toward the close of Mr. Madison's earlier Congress, which became formidable during his term, he was nominated for reëlection by a second term, and which ultimately crystalized Congressional Caucus held at Washington, in into what was then called the Republican May, 1812. In September of the same year, a party. John Adams, of Massachusetts, was convention of the Opposition, representing prominent among the leading Federalists, while eleven States, was held in the city of New. Thomas Jefferson, of Virginia, was preëmi- York, which nominated De Witt Clinton, of gently the author and oracle of the Republican New-York, for President. He was also put in party, and, by common consent, they were the nomination by the Republican Legislature of opposing candidates for the Presidency, on New-York. The ensuing canvass resulted in Washington's retirement in 1796-7.

the reëlection of Mr. Madison, who received Mr. Adams was then chosen President, while 128 electoral votes to 89 for De Witt Clinton. Mr. Jefferson, having the largest electoral vote In 1816, the Republican Congressional Caucus next to Mr. A., became Vice-President. nominated James Monroe, who received, in the

The first Congressional Caucus to nominate caucus, 65 votes to 54 for Wm. H. Crawford, candidates for President and Vice-President, is of Georgia. The Opposition, or Federalists, said to have been held in Philadelphia in the named Rufus King, of New-York, who receivea year 1800, and to have nominated Mr. Jeffer- only 34 electoral votes out of 217. There was son for the first office, and Aaron Burr for the no opposition to the reëlection of Mr. Monroe second. These candidates were elected after a in 1820, a single (Republican) vote being cast desperate struggle, beating John Adams and against him, and for John Quincy Adams. Charles C. Pinckney, of South Carolina. In In 1824, the Republican party could not be 1804, Mr. Jefferson was reëlected President, i induced to abide by the decision of a Congres with George Clinton, of New-York, for Vice, sional Caucus. A large majority of the Repub. encountering but slight opposition: Messrs. lican members formally refused to participate Charles C. Pinckney and Rufus King, the op- in such a gathering, or be governed by its deciposing candidates, receiving only 14 out of 176 sion; still, a Caucus was called and attended by Electoral Votes. We have been unable to find the friends of Mr. Crawford alone. Of the 261 any record as to the manner of their nomina. members of Congress at this time, 216 were tion. In January, 1808, when Mr. Jefferson's Democrats or Republicans, yet only 66 res. becond term was about to close, a Republican ponded to their names at roll-call, 64 of whom Congressional Caucus was held at Washington, voted for Mr. Crawford as the Republican nomito decide as to the relative claims of Madison nee for President. This nomination was very and Monroe for the succession, the Legisla extensively repudiated throughout the country, lure of Virginia, wbich had been said to exert I and three competing Republican candidates

A

POLITICAL TEXT-BOOK

FOR 1860:

COMPRISING A BRIEF VIEW OF

PRESIDENTIAL NOMINATIONS AND ELECTIONS:

INCLUDING

ALL THE NATIONAL PLATFORMS EVER YET ADOPTED:

ALSO,

A HISTORY OF THE STRUGGLE

RESPECTING

SLAVERY IN THE TERRITORIES,

AND OF THE

ACTION OF CONGRESS AS TO THE

FREEDOM OF THE PUBLIC LANDS,

WITH

THE MOST NOTABLE SPEECHES AND LETTERS

OF

MESSRS. LINCOLN, DOUGLAS, BELL, CASS, SEWARD, EVERETT, BRECKINRIDGE,

H. V. JOHNSON, ETC., ETC., TOUCHING THE QUESTIONS OF THE DAY;

AND

RETURNS OF ALL PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS SINCE 1836.

COMPILED BY HORACE GREELEY AND JOHN F. CLEVELAND.

NEW-YORK:

PUBLISHED BY THE TRIBUNE ASSOCIATION.

154 NASSAU-STREET.

US 5368.20.3

HARVARD
UNIVERSITY

LIBRARY
APR 28 1.54

ENTERED according to Act of Congress, lo the year 1860, by

TIE TRIBUNI ASSOCIATION,

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the Calted States for the Southern District of New York.

W. L. Tixson, Stereotyper.

« FöregåendeFortsätt »