Human Ecology, Human Economy: Ideas for an Ecologically Sustainable Future

Framsida
Mark Diesendorf, Clive Hamilton
Allen & Unwin, 1997 - 378 sidor
Designed as an undergraduate textbook, this work investigates our dependence on the integrity of the Earth's ecosystems. It presents an introduction to human ecology, discusses the principles of ecologically sustainable development, and investigates the foundations of ecological economics. It also evaluates biodiversity, assesses the effects of trade on the environment, and analyzes the ethical considerations of ecological economics. Using case studies, the authors investigate the greenhouse effect, soil erosion and the environmental and ecological impact of current economic analysis.
 

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Figures
5
Figures
27
Foundations of ecological economics
35
continued
50
Tables
57
Principles of ecological sustainability
64
Values and ethics
125
Trade and the environment
148
Tables
221
Impacts of energy use
243
Urban transport and urban form
267
The ecologically sustainable development process
285
Some pathways to ecological sustainability
302
Introduction to energy and power
327
Typical rates of energy use for adult humans engaged
329
Glossary of acronyms
344

Soils and agriculture
171
Greenhouse response in the energy sector
197
compared with the bill from an energy service company
206
Index
369
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Populära avsnitt

Sidan 70 - food production is not threatened, and to enable economic development to proceed in a sustainable manner. the conservation of biological diversity, the sustainable use of its components and the fair and equitable sharing of the benefits arising out of the utilisation of genetic resources, including by appropriate access to genetic resources and by appropriate transfer of relevant technologies.
Sidan 77 - damage, lack of full scientific certainty should not be used as a reason for postponing measures to prevent environmental degradation. In the application of the precautionary principle, public and private decisions should be guided by: • careful evaluation to avoid, wherever practicable, serious or irreversible damage to the environment; and • an assessment of the risk-weighted consequences.
Sidan 130 - A thing is right when it tends to preserve the integrity, stability and beauty of the biotic community. It is wrong when it tends otherwise
Sidan 70 - conservation of biological diversity, the sustainable use of its components and the fair and equitable sharing of the benefits arising out of the utilisation of genetic resources, including by appropriate access to genetic resources and by appropriate transfer of relevant technologies.
Sidan 70 - system . within a time frame sufficient to allow ecosystems to adapt naturally to climate change, to ensure food production is not threatened, and to enable economic development to proceed in a sustainable manner.
Sidan 77 - defines the precautionary principle as: Where there are threats of serious or irreversible environmental damage, lack of full scientific certainty should not be used as a reason for postponing measures to prevent environmental degradation. In the application of the precautionary principle, public and private decisions should be guided by:
Sidan 70 - Objective stabilisation of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climatic system
Sidan 24 - The city was desolate. . . It lay before us like a shattered bark in the midst of the ocean, her masts gone, her name effaced, her crew perished, and none to tell whence she came, to whom she belonged, how long on her voyage, or what caused her destruction
Sidan 131 - flourishing of human life and cultures is compatible with a substantial decrease of the human population [and that the] flourishing of non-human life requires such a decrease'.
Sidan 84 - the maximum amount that a person or a nation could consume over some time period and still be as well off at the end of the period as at the beginning. That is,

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Om författaren (1997)

Mark Diesendorf is senior lecturer in the Human Ecology program at the Australian National University. Clive Hamilton is the Executive Director of the Australia Institute.

Bibliografisk information