Humanism in an Age of Science: The Amsterdam Athenaeum in the Golden Age, 1632-1704

Framsida
BRILL, 2009 - 433 sidor
In 1632, the Amsterdam regents founded an Athenaeum or 'Illustrious School'. This kind of institution provided academic teaching, although it could not grant degrees and had no compulsory four-faculty system. Athenaeums proliferated in the first century after the Dutch Revolt, but few of them survived long. They have been interpreted as the manifestation of an evolving vision of the role of a higher education; this book, by contrast, argues that education at the Amsterdam Athenaeum was staunchly traditional both in methods and in substance. While religious, philosophical and scientific disputes rocked contemporary Dutch learned society, this analysis of letters, orations and disputations reveals that a traditional and Aristotelian humanism thrived at the Athenaeum until well into the seventeenth century.
 

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Innehåll

Introduction
3
Chapter One Higher Education in the Low Countries
21
Chapter Two An Amsterdam Cortege
45
The second period
68
The third period
95
Conclusion
110
Chapter Four Public teaching
135
Chapter Five Semipublic teaching
149
the philosophical subjects
221
Chapter Nine The teaching of law
297
Chapter Ten The teaching of medicine
309
Chapter Eleven The teaching of theology
329
Chapter Twelve Conclusion
351
The Athenaeum in the academic landscape
358
Timeline of professors
365
Easter and Pentecost holidays at the Athenaeum
369

The practice oration
160
Chapter Six Holidays timetables and absences
167
the rhetorical subjects
185

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Om författaren (2009)

Dirk van Miert, Ph.D. (2004) in Latin, University of Amsterdam, is a postdoctoral fellow at the Warburg Institute, London. He has published on many aspects of early modern intellectual history and is co-editor of the correspondence of Joseph Scaliger.

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