Revolutionary Writers: Literature and Authority in the New Republic, 1725-1810

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Oxford University Press, 27 feb. 1986 - 337 sidor
Elliott demonstrates how America's first men of letters--Timothy Dwight, Joel Barlow, Philip Freneau, Hugh Henry Brackenridge, and Charles Brockden Brown--sought to make individual genius in literature express the collective genius of the American people. Without literary precedent to aid them, Elliott argues, these writers attempted to convey a vision of what America ought to be; and when the moral imperatives implicit in their writings were rejected by the vast number of their countrymen they became pioneers of another sort--the first to experience the alienation from mainstream American culture that would become the fate of nearly all serious writers who would follow.
 

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Innehåll

Introduction
3
The Crisis of Authority in the Revolutionary Age
19
Timothy Dwight Pastor Poet and Politics
55
Joel Barlow Innocence and Experience Abroad
92
Philip Freneau Poetry of Social Commitment
128
Hugh Henry Brackenridge The Regenerative Power of American Humor
171
Charles Brockden Brown The Burden of the Past
218
Conclusion
271
Notes
277
Bibliography
303
Index
317
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Sidan 3 - For in this world of lies, Truth is forced to fly like a scared white doe in the woodlands; and only by cunning glimpses will she reveal herself, as in Shakspeare and other masters of the great Art of Telling the Truth, — even though it be covertly and by snatches.

Om författaren (1986)

Emory Elliott is University Professor at the University of California, Riverside. Louis Freitas Caton is Professor of English at Auburn University. Jeffrey Rhyne is a graduate fellow in English at the University of California, Riverside.

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