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CONTENTS.

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MEMOIRS of the life and writings of Dr. Gold The Preface to the Roman History,

230

smith,

7 The Preface to a History of England, .

, 231

The Vicar of Wakefield,

57 The Preface to the History of the Earth, etc. 232

An Inquiry into the Present State of Polite The Preface to the Beauties of English Poetry, 233

Learning,

122 The Preface to a Collection of Poems, etc. 238

MISCELLANEOUS POEMS.

Criticism on Massey's Translation of the
Prologue by Laberius, .

143
Fasti of Ovid,

239

The Double Transformation,

ib. Criticism on Barrett's Translation of Ovid's

New Simile, in the manner of Swift, 144 Epistles,

242

Description of an Author's Bedchamber, 145

LETTERS FROM A CITIZEN OF THE

The Hermit; a Ballad,

ib.
An Elegy on the Death of a Mad Dog,

WORLD TO HIS FRIENDS IN THE

147

EAST.

Stanzas on Woman,

ib.

Letter

The Traveller; or, a Prospect of Society, ib.

The Deserted Village,

I. Introduction. A character of the Chi-

152

The Gift,

. 248

nese Philosopher,

157

II. The arrival of the Chinese in Lon-

· Epitaph on Dr. Parnell,

ib.

don. His motives for the journey.

Epilogue to the Comedy of the Sisters, ib.

Some description of the streets and

Epilogue spoken by Mrs. Bulkley and Miss

houses,

ib.

Catley,

ib.

III. The description of London continu-

Epilogue intended for Mrs. Bulkley, 158

ed. The luxury of the English.

The Haunch of Venison,

159

Its benefits. The fine gentleman.

Song from the Oratorio of the Captivity, 160

The fine lady,

249

Song,

ib.

IV. English pride. Liberty. An instance

The Clown's Reply,

ib.

of both. Newspapers. Politeness, 251

Epitaph on Edward Purdon,

V. English passion for politics. A spe-

An Elegy on Mrs. Mary Blaize,

ib.

cimen of a newspaper. Character-

Retaliation,

ib.

istic of the manners of different

Postscript to ditto,

163

countries,

252

Song,

164

VI. Happiness lost by seeking after re-

Prologue to Zobeide,

ib.

finement. The Chinese philoso-

Epilogue spoken by Mr. Lewes,

ib.
pher's disgraces,

253

The Logicians Refuted,

165

VII. The tie of wisdom only to make us

Stanzas on the Taking of Quebec,

ib.

happy. The benefits of travelling

On a beautiful Youth struck blind by Light-

upon the morals of a philosopher, 254

ning,

ib.

VIII. The Chinese deceived by a prostitute

A Sonnet,

ib.

in the streets of London,

255

DRAMATIC.

IX. The licentiousness of the English

The Good-natured Man. A Comedy,

166

with regard to women. A charac-

ter of a woman's man,

. 256

She Stoops to Conquer, or, the Mistakes of a
Night. A Comedy,

193

X. The journey of the Chinese from Pe-

kin to Moscow. The customs of

An Oratorio; first printed in the Paris edi-

the Daures,

• 257

tion, in 1825, from the original in Dr.
Goldsmith's own handwriting,

XI. The benefits of luxury in making a
221

people more wise and happy,

PREFACES AND CRITICISM.

XII. The funeral solemnities of the En-

The Preface to Dr. Brookes's Natural His-

glish. Their passion for flattering

tory,

226

epitaphs,

259

Introduction to a New History of the World, 228 XIII. An account of Westminster Abbey, 260

43X137

• 258

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Letter

Page 1 Letter

Page

XIV. The reception of the Chinese

dom. An allegory to prove its

from a Lady of distinction, 262

futility,

292

XV. Against cruelty to animals. A XXXVIII. The Chinese philosopher praises
story from the Zendevesta of

the justice of a late sentence,

Zoroastor,

263

and instances the injustice of

XVI. Of falsehood propagated by books

the King of France, in the case

seemingly sincere,

264

of the Prince of Charolais, 293

XVII. Of the war now carried on be XXXIX. The description of true polite-
tween France and England,

ness. Two letters of different

with its frivolous motives, 265

countries, by ladies falsely

XVIII. The story of the Chinese ma-

thought polite at home, 295

tron,

266 XL. The English still have poets,

XIX. The English method of treating

though not versifiers, 296

women caught in adultery.

XLI. The behaviour of the congrega-

The Russian method, 267

tion in St. Paul's church at

XX. Some account of the republic of

prayers,

297

letters in England,

269 XLII. The history of China more re-

XXI. The Chinese goes to see a play, 270

plete with great actions than

XXII. The Chinese philosopher's son

that of Europe,

298
made a slave in Persia, 272 XLIII. An apostrophe on the supposed

XXIII. The English subscription in fa-

death of Voltaire, .

299

vour of the French prisoners

XLIV. Wisdom and precept may lessen
commended, .

273

our miseries, but can never in-

XXIV. The venders of quack medicines

crease our positive satisfactions 301

and nostrums ridiculed, 274 XLV. The ardour of the people of Lon-
XXV. The natural rise and decline of

don in running after sights and

kingdoms, exemplified in the

monsters,

302

history of the kingdom of Lao, 275 XLVI. A dream,

304

XXVI. The character of the man in XLVII. Misery best relieved by dissipa-

black, with some instances of

tion,

305

his inconsistent conduct, 276 XLVIII. The absurdity of persons in high,
XXVII. The history of the man in black, 278

station pursuing employments
XXVIII. On the great numbers of old

beneath them, exemplified in

maids and bachelors in Lon-

a fairy tale,

306

don. Some of the causes,

280 XLIX. The fairy tale continued, 308

XXIX. A description of a club of au-

L. An attempt to define what is

thors,

281

meant by English liberty, . 309

XXX. The proceedings of the club of

LI. A bookseller's visit to the Chi-

authors,

282

310

XXXI. The perfection of the Chinese

LII. The impossibility of distinguish-
in the art of gardening. The

ing men in England by their

description of a Chinese garden 384

dress. Two instances of this, 312

XXXII. Of the degeneracy of some of the

LIII. The absurd taste for obscene and
English nobility. A mush.

pert novels, such as Tristram

room feast among the Tartars, 285

Shandy, ridiculed,

313

XXXIII. The manner of writing among

LIV. The character of an important

the Chinese. The eastern tales

trifler,

314

of magazines, etc. ridiculed, 287 LV. His character continued; with
XXXIV. Of the present ridiculous passion

that of his wife, his house, and

of the nobility for painting, 288

furniture,

315

XXXV. The philosopher's son describes

LVI. Some thoughts on the present
a lady, his fellow-captive, 290

situation of affairs in the differ-
XXXVI. A continuance of his correspond-

ent countries of Europe, .
ence. The beautiful captive

LVII. The difficulty of rising in litera-
consents to marry her lord, . 291

ry reputation without intrigue
XXXVII. The correspondence still con-

or riches,
tinued. He begins to be dis LVIII. A visitation dinner described, 319
gusted in the pursuit of wis

LIX. The Chinese philosopher's son

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