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and judgment, he relates the particulars of an experiment of the vegetable regimen instituted in his own family. He next states the evidence against a meat diet, attempts a reply to several of the objections usually made to Dr. Lambe's principles, and ventures finally to touch upon some consequences connected with the theory of contagion, which he conceives to follow from those principles.

He will now close this first part of the book with a caution to him who may become a convert to this simple method of preventing disease, not to lose bis temper when asgailed in argument by his tenacious opponents with violence almost inexplicable; and to be firm and constant in his own practice, in contempt of all the means which will be resorted to, whether threats or persuasions, to turn him aside from his offensive purpose; remenıbering, if he aspire to the privileges of a freeman, what were the ancient conditions of that claim, and what the oracular language in which they were pronounced

Quisnam igitur liber? sapiens, sibi qui imperiosus.

APPENDIX.

Mr. Locke felt that there was something wrong in the intellectual state of mankind. In bis Essay on Human Understanding, book ii. ch. 33, he says, “ There is scarce any one that does not observe something that seeins odd to him, and is in itself really extravagant in the opinions, reasonings, and actions of other men. The least flaw of this kind, if at all different from his own, every one is quick-sighted enough to espy in another, and will by the authority of reason forwardly condemn, though he be guilty of much greater unreasonableness in his own tenets and conduct, which he never perceives, and will very hardly, if at all, be convinced of.

“This proceeds not wholly from self-love, though that has often a great hand in it. Men of fair minds, and not given up to the overweening of self-flattery, are frequently guilty of it; and in many cases one with amazement hears the arguings, and is astonished at the obstinacy of a worthy man, who yields not to the evidence of season, though laid before him as clear as day-light.

“This sort of unreasonableness is usually imputed to education and prejudice, and for the most part truly enough, though that reaches not the bottom of the disease, nor shows distinctly enough whence it rises, or wherein it lies. Education is often rightly assigned for the cause, and prejudice is a good general name for the thing itself: but yet, I think he ought to look a little farther, who would trace this sort of madness to the root it springs from; and so explain it as to show whence this flaw has its original in very sober and rational minds, and wherein it consists.

“I shall be pardoned for calling it by so harsh a name as madness, when it is considered that opposition to reason deserves that name, and is really madness; and there is scarce a man so free from it, but that if he should always, on all occasions, argue or do as in some cases he constantly does, would not be thought fitter for Bedlam than civil conversation. I do not here mean when he is under the power of an unruly passion, but in the steady calm course of his life.”

Mr. Locke, not having discovered the physical source of this disease, as he calls it, ascribes it to a wrong association of ideas, which is only another effect of the same cause.

A

HISTORY

OF

THE PENAL

PEN AL LA WS

AGAINST THE

IRISH CATHOLICS ;

FROM THE TREATY OF LIMERICK TO THE UNION.

WITH AN INDEX.

BY SIR HENRY PARNELL, BART. M. P.

[Continued from No. XXXIX.]

NEW EDITION, CORRECTED FOR THB PAMPHLETEER

EXCLUSIVELY.

LONDON:

A

HISTORY

OF THE

PENAL LAWS,

&c.

Though the treaty of Limerick was now violated in every point, the spirit of persecution was still restless and unsatisfied. However great was the ingenuity of the legislators who produced that master-piece of oppression, the act to prevent the farther growth of Popery, it was found that another act was still wanting to es. plain and amend it. Such an act passed in the year 1709.'

The 1st clause provides, that no Papists shall be capable of taking any annuity for life.

The following is the 3d clause, every word of which is of value, in order to show the vexations with which the unfortunate Catholics of Ireland have been exposed : “ And, be it further enacted, by the authority

aforesaid, that where and as often as any child or children of any Popish parent or parents hath, or have heretofore professed or conformed him, her, or themselves, to the Protestant religion, as by law established, and enrolled in the High Court of Chancery, a certificate of the Bishop of the diocese in which he, she, or they shall inhabit or reside, testifying his, her, or their being a Protestant, and conforming him, her, or themselves, to the church of Ireland, as by law established, it shall and may be lawful for the High Court of Chancery, upon a bill founded upon this act, to oblige the said Papist parent, or parents, to discover upon oath the full value of all his, her, or their estate, as well personal as real, clear, over and above all real incumbrances and debts con

8th Anne, c. 3.

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